Faculty Profile

Jina Kim

Visiting Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies (2015)

Contact Information

kimji@dickinson.edu

Stern Center for Global Educ Room 001

Bio

Jina Kim's research and teaching interests focus on the cultural history and literary history of Korea from the late nineteenth century to the present with a particular emphasis on global and Korean modernisms, urban studies, comparative colonialism, and intermediality. Her first book, Urban Modernity in Colonial Korea and Taiwan, a comparative study of Korean and Taiwanese modernist literature and culture from the early twentieth century, is forthcoming. In addition to having published on Korean and East Asian film, literature, and culture, she is a co-editor of a special issue of the Journal of Korean Studies on Korean Culture, New Media, and Digital Humanities. Her other research and teaching interests include the history of Korean diaspora, transnational literature, and post-national literature and media. Professor Kim is currently at work on a book project on Intermedial Aesthetics and recently began a comparative study of Taihoku Imperial University and Keijo Imperial University. At Dickinson College, she will be teaching various courses on Korean literature, culture, history, and media including "Soap, Sparkle, and Pop: Contemporary Korea and Soft Power" and "Modern Girls and Marxist Boys: Gender and Modernity in Early 20th Century East Asia" among others.

Education

  • B.A., University of Chicago, 1993
  • M.A., University of Washington, 2002
  • Ph.D., 2006

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

EASN 204 Sex/Screen/Sports: Korean Film
Cross-listed with FLST 210-02. Taking the "Three S" cultural policy of 1980s South Korea as a springboard, this course surveys important contemporary social developments of South Korea through its film and literature. We will focus on films from the 1980s to the present.

EASN 205 War and Peace
The importance of the Korean War continues in shaping both East Asia and American foreign policy and culture today in the 21st century. Yet, the Korean War continues to be referred to as “the forgotten war.” This course will attempt to move beyond nationalist historiography and international relations paradigms that have dominated existing studies and turn to representations of the war in transnational texts and contexts. We will examine fiction, poetry, memoirs, photographs, art, and films produced by Koreans (North and South), Japanese, resident Koreans in Japan, African and Asian Americans, as well as veterans of the war in China and the U.S. Through these diverse texts, the course will explore the complex and far-reaching impact of the war not only on the two Koreas, but around the globe from China to Turkey. In addition to the literary texts, readings will include archival materials such as government documents, secondary articles on the history of the war, and analyses of cultural artifacts produced by the Cold War. The aim of the course is to trace historical and aesthetic connections that situate the Korean War that extend far beyond the boundaries of the nation and the immediate war years.

EASN 205 North Korea: Beyond/Visible
Images of North Korea as a poverty stricken, highly regimented, hermit kingdom led by the Kim dictatorial dynasty abound on one hand, while on the other hand, images of technologically advanced, egalitarian society filled with satiated citizens also abound. How are we to understand these conflicting images? In this course, we will study the ways in which literature, film, and media produced within and about North Korea (the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) construct “North Korea” in various ways. Through our study of North Korea’s history, literature, and visual culture, since its establishment in 1948, this course will attempt to understand North Korea beyond the immediately visible. The course will also include, in particular, South Korean and U.S. depictions of North Korea.

FLST 210 Sex/Screen/Sports: Korean Film
Cross-listed with EASN 204-01. Taking the "Three S" cultural policy of 1980s South Korea as a springboard, this course surveys important contemporary social developments of South Korea through its film and literature. We will focus on films from the 1980s to the present.

Spring 2018

EASN 204 Screening Korea
Cross-listed with FLST 210-03 and HIST 215-02. Do national cinemas evolve with a country’s major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations’ past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.

EASN 205 Soap, Sparkle, and Pop
Cross-listed with FLST 210-06. This course investigates and evaluates contemporary Korean popular culture, and more specifically the 21st century South Korean cultural phenomenon called hallyu (Korean Wave)—its promises and limitations as well as its popularity and backlash against it. We will study television, manhwa (comic books), and music and ask how they participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, identity, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics both regionally and globally. The course also aims to equip students with analytical tools to critically think about and understand popular culture.

FLST 210 Soap, Sparkle, and Pop
Cross-listed with EASN 205-02. This course investigates and evaluates contemporary Korean popular culture, and more specifically the 21st century South Korean cultural phenomenon called hallyu (Korean Wave)—its promises and limitations as well as its popularity and backlash against it. We will study television, manhwa (comic books), and music and ask how they participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, identity, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics both regionally and globally. The course also aims to equip students with analytical tools to critically think about and understand popular culture.

FLST 210 Screening Korea
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and EASN 204-01. Do national cinemas evolve with a country’s major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations’ past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.

HIST 215 Screening Korea
Cross-listed with EASN 204-01 and FLST 210-03. Do national cinemas evolve with a country’s major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations’ past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.