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Faculty Profile

Jean-Pierre Karegeye

Visiting International Scholar in Philosophy (2017)

Contact Information

karegeyj@dickinson.edu

Bio

Dr. Karegeye is currently visiting scholar in Philosophy at Dickinson College. The primary focus of his teaching and research is Francophone literature, African Philosophy and Theology in dialogue with other disciplines and multiple fields of Study, including in-depth analysis of genocide, Testimonial narratives, Religious extremism, gender, and diaspora. Solid experience in teaching at multiple levels with particular expertise in constructing courses, tracing common elements across disciplines including Literature, Philosophy, Social Ethics, Critical Theory, Religion, Sociology, History, and Communications. Some of his current projects explore how genocide and religious radicalization in Africa imply a reconstruction and a relocation of social sciences and humanities. He has (co-) authored six books and journals and more than 50 articles including Children in Armed Conflicts (2012), “Ruanda : de la literatura post-genocidio o el dialogo entre testimonio y compromiso” (2012) , “Génocide au Rwanda et la critique africaine contemporaine” (2016), (With Margee Ensign), Religion in War and Peace in Africa ( Routledge, 2020) He is a regular commentator on Voice of America in various programs including “Dialogue des religions”, “L’Amérique et nous”, and “Washington Forum”

Education

  • M.A., University of California at Berkeley, 2004
  • Ph.D., 2009

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

RELG 210 Religions of Africa
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06 and SOCI 230-05.

AFST 220 Religions of Africa
Cross-listed with RELG 210-01 and SOCI 230-05.The course examines the variety of religious experiences, traditions, and representations of religion in African cultures. These include indigenous religions, Islam, Christianity and syncretistic traditions. We will examine the various roles that religion plays in responding to current crises facing African cultures, including HIV/AIDS pandemic, political conflicts, and issues related to gender (e.g., girls' education, shifting perspectives on masculinity and femininity) that have been shaped by religious attitudes. Students will use novels, memoir and film to supplement scholarly readings.

ENGL 222 Of A Beautiful Mind
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-04 and FREN 362-01. A 2012 New York Times article entitled “Is Philosophy Literature?” raised the following question: “Do people read philosophy for pleasure?” The question clearly suggests that the article’s author links “pleasure” to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature refers to the “beauty” and philosophy suggest “reason”; however, these distinctions about pleasure and knowledge/rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature makes you think and how philosophy delves into interpretation of Literature. While distinct, the two disciplines have always been in dialogue. This course will scrutinize the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choices, human freedom, existence, commitment). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Simone de Beauvoir, Aimé Césaire, Mudimbe. We will follow three axes: - The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas - A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view - A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, (Post-)Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction, Post colonial and Feminist studies. This course is taught in English. Students from the French department are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks, for an hour, for a ‘Café philo-littéraire’ that will consist of discussing in French student’s papers written in French and of revisiting “French Theory”.

SOCI 230 Religions of Africa
Cross-listed with RELG 210-01 and AFST 220-06.The course examines the variety of religious experiences, traditions, and representations of religion in African cultures. These include indigenous religions, Islam, Christianity and syncretistic traditions. We will examine the various roles that religion plays in responding to current crises facing African cultures, including HIV/AIDS pandemic, political conflicts, and issues related to gender (e.g., girls' education, shifting perspectives on masculinity and femininity) that have been shaped by religious attitudes. Students will use novels, memoir and film to supplement scholarly readings.

PHIL 261 Of a Beautiful Mind
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-03 and FREN 362-01. A 2012 New York Times article entitled “Is Philosophy Literature?” raised the following question: “Do people read philosophy for pleasure?” The question clearly suggests that the article’s author links “pleasure” to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature refers to the “beauty” and philosophy suggest “reason”; however, these distinctions about pleasure and knowledge/rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature makes you think and how philosophy delves into interpretation of Literature. While distinct, the two disciplines have always been in dialogue. This course will scrutinize the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choices, human freedom, existence, commitment). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Simone de Beauvoir, Aimé Césaire, Mudimbe. We will follow three axes: - The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas - A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view - A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, (Post-)Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction, Post colonial and Feminist studies. This course is taught in English. Students from the French department are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks, for an hour, for a ‘Café philo-littéraire’ that will consist of discussing in French student’s papers written in French and of revisiting “French Theory”.

FREN 362 Of A Beautiful Mind
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-04 and ENGL 222-03. A 2012 New York Times article entitled “Is Philosophy Literature?” raised the following question: “Do people read philosophy for pleasure?” The question clearly suggests that the article’s author links “pleasure” to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature refers to the “beauty” and philosophy suggest “reason”; however, these distinctions about pleasure and knowledge/rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature makes you think and how philosophy delves into interpretation of Literature. While distinct, the two disciplines have always been in dialogue. This course will scrutinize the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choices, human freedom, existence, commitment). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Simone de Beauvoir, Aimé Césaire, Mudimbe. We will follow three axes: - The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas - A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view - A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, (Post-)Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction, Post colonial and Feminist studies. This course is taught in English. Students from the French department are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks, for an hour, for a ‘Café philo-littéraire’ that will consist of discussing in French student’s papers written in French and of revisiting “French Theory”.

FREN 364 Of A Beautiful Mind
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-04, FREN 362-01 and ENGL 222-03. A 2012 New York Times article entitled “Is Philosophy Literature?” raised the following question: “Do people read philosophy for pleasure?” The question clearly suggests that the article’s author links “pleasure” to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature refers to the “beauty” and philosophy suggest “reason”; however, these distinctions about pleasure and knowledge/rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature makes you think and how philosophy delves into interpretation of Literature. While distinct, the two disciplines have always been in dialogue. This course will scrutinize the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choices, human freedom, existence, commitment). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Simone de Beauvoir, Aimé Césaire, Mudimbe. We will follow three axes: - The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas - A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view - A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, (Post-)Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction, Post colonial and Feminist studies. This course is taught in English. Students from the French department are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks, for an hour, for a ‘Café philo-littéraire’ that will consist of discussing in French student’s papers written in French and of revisiting “French Theory”.