Faculty Profile

Jacob Jacob

Visiting International Scholar in International Studies (2017)

Contact Information

jacobj@dickinson.edu

239 W Louther St Room 203
717.254.8066

Education

  • B.A., University of Uyo, Nigeria, 1997
  • M.A., Lancaster University, U.K., 2005
  • Ph.D., University of Leeds, U.K., 2010

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

INST 290 Social Mvmt/Media & Global Chg
Cross-listed with AFST 320-03.Just as the printing press and the early public spheres created the tools and the space for the rise of nationalist and religious movements in 16th century Europe, new communication technologies and social media have created both the space and the tools for the rise of social movements in contemporary society. Movements ranging from the Arab Spring to #BlackLivesMatter and #BringBackOurGirls have drawn on social media to mobilize and organize popular interventions in the public sphere. This course is a conceptual and case study exploration of the nteractions between the ecologies of social media, social movements and social change within the context of an increasingly globalised public sphere. The course explores different approaches to studying social media, social movements and social change, drawing on relevant case studies. It also explores the increasing arsenal of instruments of control, both technical and (il)legal, used by governments and institutions to ‘capture’ social media and disrupt social movements.

AFST 320 Social Mvmt/Media & Global Chg
Cross-listed with INST 290-04.Just as the printing press and the early public spheres created the tools and the space for the rise of nationalist and religious movements in 16th century Europe, new communication technologies and social media have created both the space and the tools for the rise of social movements in contemporary society. Movements ranging from the Arab Spring to #BlackLivesMatter and #BringBackOurGirls have drawn on social media to mobilize and organize popular interventions in the public sphere. This course is a conceptual and case study exploration of the interactions between the ecologies of social media, social movements and social change within the context of an increasingly globalised public sphere. The course explores different approaches to studying social media, social movements and social change, drawing on relevant case studies. It also explores the increasing arsenal of instruments of control, both technical and (il)legal, used by governments and institutions to ‘capture’ social media and disrupt social movements.

Spring 2018

INST 290 The Media in War and Peace
Cross-listed with POSC 290-06. This course examines the role of the media in international crises and in peace-building and the techniques adopted by state and non-state actors as well as international organizations to influence media performance before, during and after violent conflicts. It begins by examining the theoretical role of the media in peace-building and in international crises and then, through a case study approach, measures media performance in practice in the major conflicts of the cold war and in the post 9/11 era. The course also explores the role of the media in international peace support operations ranging from the military humanitarian interventions in the Balkans in the 1990s to recent UN Peacekeeping Operations in the DRC, Somalia and Sudan. By the end of the course, students will be able to evaluate the role of the media as an observer, participant or catalyst in war and peace. They will be equipped to reflect more deeply on the nature of the media’s role in either pushing governments into military, peacekeeping or humanitarian involvement in foreign crises or pulling them out of them. They will also be able to evaluate the role of the media as agents of terrorist propaganda and/or agents for countering violent extremism.

POSC 290 The Media in War and Peace
Cross-listed with INST 290-01. This course examines the role of the media in international crises and in peace-building and the techniques adopted by state and non-state actors as well as international organizations to influence media performance before, during and after violent conflicts. It begins by examining the theoretical role of the media in peace-building and in international crises and then, through a case study approach, measures media performance in practice in the major conflicts of the cold war and in the post 9/11 era. The course also explores the role of the media in international peace support operations ranging from the military humanitarian interventions in the Balkans in the 1990s to recent UN Peacekeeping Operations in the DRC, Somalia and Sudan. By the end of the course, students will be able to evaluate the role of the media as an observer, participant or catalyst in war and peace. They will be equipped to reflect more deeply on the nature of the media’s role in either pushing governments into military, peacekeeping or humanitarian involvement in foreign crises or pulling them out of them. They will also be able to evaluate the role of the media as agents of terrorist propaganda and/or agents for countering violent extremism.