Fall 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 100-01 Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Jessica Vooris
Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability. This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
0930:MWF   DENNY 304
WGSS 101-01 Southern Women Writers
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-03. A course in prose written by women of the American South. We will begin with the diary of Mary Chesnut written during the Civil War and continue with notable writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, which may include Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Zora Neale Hurston, Ellen Gilchrist, Ellen Douglas, Kaye Gibbons. Some critical and theoretical texts will also be required. Writing assignments will include short explications,longer essays, and an exam. Attendance and participation in class discussion are required.
1330:TF   EASTC 411
WGSS 200-01 Feminist Practices, Writing and Research
Instructor: Jessica Vooris
Course Description:
Building upon the key concepts and modes of inquire introduced in the WGSS Introductory course, WGSS 200 deepens students understanding of how feminist perspectives on power, experience, and inequality uniquely shape how scholars approach research questions, writing practices, methods and knowledge production. Approaches may include feminist approaches to memoir, oral histories, grassroots and online activism, blogging, visual culture, ethnography, archival research, space, art, literary analysis, and policy studies.Prerequisite: 100, which can be taken concurrently. Building upon the key concepts and modes of inquire introduced in the WGSS Introductory course, WGSS 200 deepens students understanding of how feminist perspectives on power, experience, and inequality uniquely shape how scholars approach research questions, writing practices, methods and knowledge production. Approaches may include feminist approaches to memoir, oral histories, grassroots and online activism, blogging, visual culture, ethnography, archival research, space, art, literary analysis, and policy studies.Prerequisite: 100, which can be taken concurrently.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
WGSS 201-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 219-01. Gender roles and sexual identity are central to the transformations that define what it means to be modern in America between the late nineteenth- and mid-twentieth centuries. Artists across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, have engaged the ever-changing boundaries of male and female, straight and gay. They have taken up these boundaries in profound and ordinary ways, both in conscious and unintentional ways. Drawing upon recent scholarship in American art, this course analyzes the shifts in the work of artists from the lesser-known nineteenth-century gender-bending printmaker Ellen Day Hale to the visual culture surrounding the notorious Oscar Wilde and, in the twentieth century, the sexual politics of such famous artist couples as Georgia OKeeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg.
1500:TF   WEISS 221
WGSS 201-02 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-04 and LALC 200-06.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality, with special emphasis on those created by women artists and on their challenge of the stereotyping of female characters and roles. During the semester, we will analyze works by Silvina Ocampo, Cristina Fernndez Cubas, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Guillermo del Toro (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Traditionally overlooked, women writers, painters, and directors have contributed significantly to the development of the fantastic genre; one of the goals of this class, therefore, will be to explore and study these contributions. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1330:MR   BOSLER 214
WGSS 300-01 Feminist Perspectives and Theories
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
This course deepens students understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform womens, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100 and 200, or co-requisite with permission of instructor. This course deepens students understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform womens, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100 and 200, or co-requisite with permission of instructor.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
WGSS 301-01 African American Women Writers
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and ENGL 321-02. This course examines a range of the literary productions written by African American women. Specifically, we will span the African-American literary tradition in order to discover the historical, political, and social forces that facilitated the evolution of Black women's voices as well as their roles inside and outside the Black community. Additionally, we will discuss such issues as self-definition, womanhood, sexuality, activism, race, class, and community.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
WGSS 301-03 Jane Austen in Her Time
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-02.This course may count as either a pre-1800 or post-1800 300-level literature class, depending on the student's research. Those students who wish to earn pre-1800 credit must inform me before add/drop is over, and I will inform the registrar and supplement and guide research accordingly. Students must satisfactorily complete the final research paper as a pre-1800 course to receive pre-1800 credit. Here is a rare opportunity to study the whole of a great writer's oeuvre in a single term. We will read all six of Austen's major novels, biographical material, and selected social history with the aim of understanding the cultural conditions described by the novels, and the novels in their cultural context. Students will lead one class discussion, write one research paper, and present an "accomplishment" befitting Austen's milieu: e. g. performing a musical composition, completing a piece of needlework, learning a card game and teaching it to the class, composing a verbal "charade," and the like. In addition, each week, each student will be expected to write and mail one letter (not e mail) to a correspondent of his/her choosing. (The letters may remain private.)
1500:MR   EASTC 314
WGSS 302-01 Research Methods in Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 335-01. This course addresses the methodological principles underlying empirical psychological research on gender and sexuality. We will specifically consider qualitative methods as they are used within psychology. Because the study of gender in particular has been strongly guided by feminist theory, this course will focus on feminist epistemologies as related to social psychological research. Class and lab time will be spent developing the following skills: critical reading and analysis of published research, design of empirical research, data collection, and qualitative data analysis. This course will culminate in the design and implementation of an original research project in the area of psychology of gender or human sexuality.
1030:TR   BOSLER 313
1330:W   DENNY 112
WGSS 302-02 Consumerism, Nationalism and Gender
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 377-01. This reading seminar examines the development of consumerism and nationalism in Europe and America beginning in the late 18th century and continuing on into the post-WWII era - from American Revolutionary boycotts to French fast food establishments. We will look for overlaps or polarities between the movements and the way gender interacted with both of them. Students may be surprised at the gendered aspects of both movements. We will consider, for example, the historical development of the image of women loving to shop, and we will study propaganda from the two world wars with men in uniform and women on the "home front." Our readings will include both promoters and critics of each movement.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
WGSS 302-03 Gender and Black Power In the US
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-04 and HIST 311-01. Gender and Black Power in the United States examines the USs Black Power movement through the prism of gender. Black Powers key principles Black self-determination, pride and consciousness have a long history in the US, and this class will focus on its history from the 1960s to the 1970s. We will consider Black Powers expressions in groups as diverse as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the US Organization, the Republic of New Afrika, the Revolutionary Action Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the Third World Womens Alliance, the Committee for a Unified NewARK, and the Combahee River Collective. Well consider how these groups shaped and were shaped by shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, and well explore the spaces that women created both within and apart from these groups as they mounted feminist critiques of the movement. Older understandings of the Black Power movement held that it was anti-feminist and characterized by male leadership and suffocating sexism. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this view by exploring how women in Black Power groups negotiated and challenged ideas about proper gender roles, how they theorized the intersections of nationalism and gender, and how they spearheaded feminist projects. This class will pay close attention to how scholars have crafted and re-crafted the history Black Powers relationship to gender ideas and ideals.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
WGSS 302-04 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-02 and POSC 290-02. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 320-01 African American Women Writers
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 321-02 and WGSS 301-01. This course examines a range of the literary productions written by African American women. Specifically, we will span the African-American literary tradition in order to discover the historical, political, and social forces that facilitated the evolution of Black women's voices as well as their roles inside and outside the Black community. Additionally, we will discuss such issues as self-definition, womanhood, sexuality, activism, race, class, and community.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
AFST 320-04 Gender and Black Power in the US
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 311-01 and WGSS 302-03. Gender and Black Power in the United States examines the USs Black Power movement through the prism of gender. Black Powers key principles Black self-determination, pride and consciousness have a long history in the US, and this class will focus on its history from the 1960s to the 1970s. We will consider Black Powers expressions in groups as diverse as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the US Organization, the Republic of New Afrika, the Revolutionary Action Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the Third World Womens Alliance, the Committee for a Unified NewARK, and the Combahee River Collective. Well consider how these groups shaped and were shaped by shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, and well explore the spaces that women created both within and apart from these groups as they mounted feminist critiques of the movement. Older understandings of the Black Power movement held that it was anti-feminist and characterized by male leadership and suffocating sexism. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this view by exploring how women in Black Power groups negotiated and challenged ideas about proper gender roles, how they theorized the intersections of nationalism and gender, and how they spearheaded feminist projects. This class will pay close attention to how scholars have crafted and re-crafted the history Black Powers relationship to gender ideas and ideals.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 219-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed WGSS 201-01. Gender roles and sexual identity are central to the transformations that define what it means to be modern in America between the late nineteenth- and mid-twentieth centuries. Artists across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, have engaged the ever-changing boundaries of male and female, straight and gay. They have taken up these boundaries in profound and ordinary ways, both in conscious and unintentional ways. Drawing upon recent scholarship in American art, this course analyzes the shifts in the work of artists from the lesser-known nineteenth-century gender-bending printmaker Ellen Day Hale to the visual culture surrounding the notorious Oscar Wilde and, in the twentieth century, the sexual politics of such famous artist couples as Georgia OKeeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. Prerequisites: 102 or WGSS 100 or AMST 201 or permission of instructor.
1500:TF   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-03 Southern Women Writers
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01. A course in prose written by women of the American South. We will begin with the diary of Mary Chesnut written during the Civil War and continue with notable writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, which may include Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Zora Neale Hurston, Ellen Gilchrist, Ellen Douglas, Kaye Gibbons. Some critical and theoretical texts will also be required. Writing assignments will include short explications,longer essays, and an exam. Attendance and participation in class discussion are required.
1330:TF   EASTC 411
ENGL 321-02 African American Women Writers
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and WGSS 301-01. This course examines a range of the literary productions written by African American women. Specifically, we will span the African-American literary tradition in order to discover the historical, political, and social forces that facilitated the evolution of Black women's voices as well as their roles inside and outside the Black community. Additionally, we will discuss such issues as self-definition, womanhood, sexuality, activism, race, class, and community.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
ENGL 341-02 Jane Austen in Her Time
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-03.This course may count as either a pre-1800 or post-1800 300-level literature class, depending on the student's research. Those students who wish to earn pre-1800 credit must inform me before add/drop is over, and I will inform the registrar and supplement and guide research accordingly. Students must satisfactorily complete the final research paper as a pre-1800 course to receive pre-1800 credit. Here is a rare opportunity to study the whole of a great writer's oeuvre in a single term. We will read all six of Austen's major novels, biographical material, and selected social history with the aim of understanding the cultural conditions described by the novels, and the novels in their cultural context. Students will lead one class discussion, write one research paper, and present an "accomplishment" befitting Austen's milieu: e. g. performing a musical composition, completing a piece of needlework, learning a card game and teaching it to the class, composing a verbal "charade," and the like. In addition, each week, each student will be expected to write and mail one letter (not e mail) to a correspondent of his/her choosing. (The letters may remain private.)
1500:MR   EASTC 314
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 311-01 Gender and Black Power in the US
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-03 and AFST 320-04. Gender and Black Power in the United States examines the USs Black Power movement through the prism of gender. Black Powers key principles Black self-determination, pride and consciousness have a long history in the US, and this class will focus on its history from the 1960s to the 1970s. We will consider Black Powers expressions in groups as diverse as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the US Organization, the Republic of New Afrika, the Revolutionary Action Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the Third World Womens Alliance, the Committee for a Unified NewARK, and the Combahee River Collective. Well consider how these groups shaped and were shaped by shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, and well explore the spaces that women created both within and apart from these groups as they mounted feminist critiques of the movement. Older understandings of the Black Power movement held that it was anti-feminist and characterized by male leadership and suffocating sexism. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this view by exploring how women in Black Power groups negotiated and challenged ideas about proper gender roles, how they theorized the intersections of nationalism and gender, and how they spearheaded feminist projects. This class will pay close attention to how scholars have crafted and re-crafted the history Black Powers relationship to gender ideas and ideals.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
HIST 377-01 Consumerism, Nationalism and Gender
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02. This reading seminar examines the development of consumerism and nationalism in Europe and America beginning in the late 18th century and continuing on into the post-WWII era - from American Revolutionary boycotts to French fast food establishments. We will look for overlaps or polarities between the movements and the way gender interacted with both of them. Students may be surprised at the gendered aspects of both movements. We will consider, for example, the historical development of the image of women loving to shop, and we will study propaganda from the two world wars with men in uniform and women on the "home front." Our readings will include both promoters and critics of each movement. Offered every two or three years.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 200-06 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-04 and WGSS 201-02.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality, with special emphasis on those created by women artists and on their challenge of the stereotyping of female characters and roles. During the semester, we will analyze works by Silvina Ocampo, Cristina Fernndez Cubas, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Guillermo del Toro (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Traditionally overlooked, women writers, painters, and directors have contributed significantly to the development of the fantastic genre; one of the goals of this class, therefore, will be to explore and study these contributions. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1330:MR   BOSLER 214
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 290-02 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-02 and WGSS 302-04. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 290-02 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-02 and WGSS 302-04. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-04 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Antonio Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-06 and WGSS 201-02.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality. During the semester, we will analyze works by Silvina Ocampo, Cristina Fernndez Cubas, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Guillermo del Toro (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Traditionally overlooked, women writers, painters, and directors have contributed significantly to the development of the fantastic genre; one of the goals of this class, therefore, will be to explore and study these contributions. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1330:MR   BOSLER 214