Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 100-01 Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Kathryn Oliviero
Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability. This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
1330:TF   DENNY 311
WGSS 102-01 Psychology of Human Sexuality
Instructor: Peter Leavitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 145-01. This course is a study of human sexuality emphasizing psychological aspects. We will cover sexual development from childhood to adulthood, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual health, and the development of sexual relationships. The study of human sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary in nature (drawing from such varied disciplines as sociology, women's studies, biology, anthropology, history, and others). Although we will cover some material from these disciplines, we will take an explicitly social psychological perspective, focusing on individual, personal, and social aspects of sexual behaviors, attitudes and beliefs.
1330:MR   KAUF 179
WGSS 102-02 Psychology of Human Sexuality
Instructor: Peter Leavitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 145-02. This course is a study of human sexuality emphasizing psychological aspects. We will cover sexual development from childhood to adulthood, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual health, and the development of sexual relationships. The study of human sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary in nature (drawing from such varied disciplines as sociology, women's studies, biology, anthropology, history, and others). Although we will cover some material from these disciplines, we will take an explicitly social psychological perspective, focusing on individual, personal, and social aspects of sexual behaviors, attitudes and beliefs.
1500:MR   KAUF 179
WGSS 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 135-01. See course description with PSYC 135 listing.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
WGSS 201-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 219-01. Gender roles and sexual identity are central to the transformations that define what it means to be modern in America between the late nineteenth- and mid-twentieth centuries. Artists across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, have engaged the ever-changing boundaries of male and female, straight and gay. They have taken up these boundaries in profound and ordinary ways, both in conscious and unintentional ways. Drawing upon recent scholarship in American art, this course analyzes the shifts in the work of artists from the lesser-known nineteenth-century gender-bending printmaker Ellen Day Hale to the visual culture surrounding the notorious Oscar Wilde and, in the twentieth century, the sexual politics of such famous artist couples as Georgia OKeeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg.
1330:MR   WEISS 219
WGSS 201-02 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 240-01 and RELG 250-02. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion and culture. Starting with the representation of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, we study the highly differentiated gender roles maintained by traditional Jewish culture, and examine the role American feminism has played in challenging those traditional roles. We will also study gender issues in contemporary Israeli society, such as the politics of marriage and divorce, public prayer and gender in the military. Some knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history is helpful, but not required as a prerequisite for this course.
1030:MWF   DENNY 104
WGSS 201-03 Police Violence and Mass Incarceration
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04. In recent years, the Black Lives Matter movement has drawn global attention to police violence and mass incarceration in the United States, all the while highlighting intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality. This course examines the social, historical, economic and political contexts for mass incarceration and police violence. Assigned readings tackle historical and theoretical bases for understanding the criminal justice system in the US. Drawing from black feminist, queer, transnational and Indigenous studies frameworks, we will question the foundations of the criminal justice system and its constructions of crime, justice and safety. Towards the end of the course, we will examine the alternative constructions of justice articulated by movements for prison abolition, transformative justice and community accountability.
1230:MWF   DENNY 304
WGSS 202-01 Race and Second Wave Feminism in the U.S.
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04 and HIST 211-02. Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US examines the US's Second Wave feminist movement through the prism of multiracial and anti-racist feminist activism. Often, the Second Wave is thought of in terms of white-dominated groups, and many believe that key feminist organizations like the National Organization for Women (NOW) were founded by and served only white women. In fact, African American feminist powerhouses like Shirley Chisholm and Pauli Murray helped to found NOW, and women of color organized some of the earliest Second Wave groups. This class will focus on Chicana, American Indian, African American and multiracial feminist thinking and activism. Topics covered will include national organizations, such as the National Black Feminist Organization and Women of All Red Nations; grassroots groups, such as the Combahee River Collective; significant figures, such as Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzalda, and Barbara Smith; key campaigns like that against sterilization abuse; and the significant debates that defined the movement, such as the question of reform versus revolution. This course will also consider the centrality of oral history to the history of women.
1330:W   DENNY 112
WGSS 202-03 Queerness in Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-02 and AFST 220-06. This course is an interdisciplinary survey of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ), and same gender loving (SGL) culture and politics. We will first review some key concepts in Black feminism since these theorists and activists have made uninvited interventions in Black (cultural) politics, which paved the way for Black critical cultural theory and methodology. We will then survey key texts and concepts of major nodes of Black LGBTQ social formation and intellectual production, exploring concepts such as intersectionality, normativity, respectability, and articulation, to name a few. Lastly, the course will facilitate the critical, close readings of various scholarly and popular texts, including writings, films, and visual art.
1030:MWF   DENNY 103
WGSS 208-01 Introduction to Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
This course explores how practices, identities, behaviors, and representations of sexualities shape and are shaped by political, cultural, social, religious, medical and economic practices of societies across time and space. It will put sexuality at the center of analysis, but will develop understandings of sexuality as they are related to sex, gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, nationality and geographical location. Students will explore the historical and social processes through which diverse behaviors are and are not designated as sexual. They will then analyze how these designations influence a range of institutional forces and social phenomena. Possible topics include: medicine, environmentalism, colonialism and nation-building, STI and HIV transmission, public health campaigns, art and literary production, visual and popular culture, community development, family structure, human rights frameworks, and law or policy. This course explores how practices, identities, behaviors, and representations of sexualities shape and are shaped by political, cultural, social, religious, medical and economic practices of societies across time and space. It will put sexuality at the center of analysis, but will develop understandings of sexuality as they are related to sex, gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, nationality and geographical location. Students will explore the historical and social processes through which diverse behaviors are and are not designated as sexual. They will then analyze how these designations influence a range of institutional forces and social phenomena. Possible topics include: medicine, environmentalism, colonialism and nation-building, STI and HIV transmission, public health campaigns, art and literary production, visual and popular culture, community development, family structure, human rights frameworks, and law or policy.
0930:MWF   DENNY 303
WGSS 301-01 Contemporary Human Trafficking
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 313-01. This class will introduce students to contemporary issues of human trafficking in the United States and globally. Human trafficking, including both commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor, is an extremely complex crime and human rights violation that demands multi-faceted, interdisciplinary responses. After we develop an understanding of the definition and various manifestations of human trafficking, we will build on the US Governments 4Ps framework--prosecution, protection, prevention and partnership-- as a way to shape our investigation and inquiry. Topics for discussion will include demand, vulnerability factors, economic networks, governmental and non-governmental organization responses, criminal justice systems, support and services for survivors, prevention efforts, corporate social responsibility, and literary and cultural representations of human trafficking. Readings will include international, federal and state legislation, survivor narratives, research reports, white papers, news coverage, films, and novels.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
WGSS 301-02 I Am Yours: Feminine Identity, Sexuality, and Power in Italian Cinema and Media
Instructor: Nicoletta Marini Maio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 310-01 and ITAL 323-01.Discussion Session for Italian and INBM students at a time TBD. In this course, we will analyze a number of movies, television programs, and commercials, from the 1950s to the present, that have concurred to the representation of the female body and sexuality as a strategic response to societal changes, including women's sexual liberation and economic advancement. By constructing a hyper-sexualized narrative of the feminine, this representation neutralized the threats posed by women's emancipation and redefined gender power relationships in the post-1968 socio-cultural context. Grounded in the intersections between feminist, post-feminist, film, and media studies perspectives, our analysis will focus on the notions of power and control.
1900:W   ALTHSE 106
1330:M   STUART 1104
WGSS 301-03 Chaucer's Women
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 311-01. Patient Griselda, sensual Alisoun, long-suffering Constance, the irrepressible Wife of Bath - in The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer provides a wide range of women who alternately uphold and challenge the medieval boundaries of femininity. In this class we will explore medieval conceptions of gender, sexuality, and authority by way of Chaucer's most memorable women, read alongside confessional manuals, scientific treatises, and religious tracts that provide insight into how medieval scholars conceptualized the differences between men and women.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
WGSS 301-04 Suicide and Transnational Violence
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 320-03. Popular representations of suicide often fixate on the question of why individuals commit suicide, reflecting narrow and pathologizing approaches. By contrast, through lectures, readings, discussions and film screenings, this course situates suicide in the context of transnational violence. This means that we will consider suicide as an effect of processes of colonization, slavery, nationalism, and capitalist globalization. Centering issues of gender and sexuality, the course will explore critical perspectives on suicide emerging from transnational, Indigenous, and postcolonial studies. Topics for discussion include Black/Indigenous suicide/murder in custody, South Asian women's suicides during the 1947 Partition of India, mass suicides and transatlantic slavery, and decolonial healing.
1030:MWF   DENNY 303
WGSS 301-05 Dance History Seminar: Modernism and the Body
Instructor: Sarah Skaggs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with THDA 316-01.
1330:MR   2527WH DANCE STU
WGSS 302-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern Japanese History
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and HIST 315-01. This course is an exploration of how sexuality and gender have been continually redefined and experienced throughout modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in eroticism, same-sex love, family structure, and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and how women and men frequently transgressed feminine and masculine ideals, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce a paper that analyzes the development of this new and exciting field of history.
1330:W   DENNY 303
WGSS 302-02 Society and the Sexes
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 378-01. This is a reading seminar that investigates three separate but interrelated threads - the history of sexuality, the history of the body and the construction of gender - in both pre-industrial and modern Europe. The course explores how definitions of male/female and feminine/masculine have changed over time and how they shaped the life experiences of men and women. Readings will include medical opinions, legal texts, diaries, novels, and political debates.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
WGSS 305-01 Gender and Sexual Identities
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 435-01.In this seminar, we will discuss current psychological theory and research relating to gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual practices. The course is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in this field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed to evaluate research findings. We will discuss such topics as traditional and alternative gender identities; gender conformity and socialization in childhood; transgender and transsexual identities; the development of heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and queer identities; the coming out process; the relationship between gender and sexual orientation; social pressures and compulsory heterosexuality; heterosexism, homophobia, and the stigma and prejudice surrounding sexual minority identities and practices. This discussion-based course is designed to encourage deep, thoughtful analysis of issues surrounding gender and sexuality. See course description with Psychology 435 listing. Prerequisites or co-requisite: 200 or PSYC 202 or 211, or permission of the instructor.
1130:WF   ALTHSE 201
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar
Instructor: Kathryn Oliviero
Course Description:
All topics will draw upon the knowledge of the history and theories of feminism and will be interdisciplinary in nature. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 100, 200 and 300 or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DENNY 315
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 220-04 Race and Second Wave Feminism in the U.S.
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-02 and WGSS 202-01. Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US examines the US's Second Wave feminist movement through the prism of multiracial and anti-racist feminist activism. Often, the Second Wave is thought of in terms of white-dominated groups, and many believe that key feminist organizations like the National Organization for Women (NOW) were founded by and served only white women. In fact, African American feminist powerhouses like Shirley Chisholm and Pauli Murray helped to found NOW, and women of color organized some of the earliest Second Wave groups. This class will focus on Chicana, American Indian, African American and multiracial feminist thinking and activism. Topics covered will include national organizations, such as the National Black Feminist Organization and Women of All Red Nations; grassroots groups, such as the Combahee River Collective; significant figures, such as Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzalda, and Barbara Smith; key campaigns like that against sterilization abuse; and the significant debates that defined the movement, such as the question of reform versus revolution. This course will also consider the centrality of oral history to the history of women
1330:W   DENNY 112
AFST 220-06 Queerness in Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-02 and WGSS 202-03. This course is an interdisciplinary survey of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ), and same gender loving (SGL) culture and politics. We will first review some key concepts in Black feminism since these theorists and activists have made uninvited interventions in Black (cultural) politics, which paved the way for Black critical cultural theory and methodology. We will then survey key texts and concepts of major nodes of Black LGBTQ social formation and intellectual production, exploring concepts such as intersectionality, normativity, respectability, and articulation, to name a few. Lastly, the course will facilitate the critical, close readings of various scholarly and popular texts, including writings, films, and visual art.
1030:MWF   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-02 Queerness in Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06 and WGSS 202-03. This course is an interdisciplinary survey of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ), and same gender loving (SGL) culture and politics. We will first review some key concepts in Black feminism since these theorists and activists have made uninvited interventions in Black (cultural) politics, which paved the way for Black critical cultural theory and methodology. We will then survey key texts and concepts of major nodes of Black LGBTQ social formation and intellectual production, exploring concepts such as intersectionality, normativity, respectability, and articulation, to name a few. Lastly, the course will facilitate the critical, close readings of various scholarly and popular texts, including writings, films, and visual art.
1030:MWF   DENNY 103
AMST 200-04 Police Violence and Mass Incarceration
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-03. In recent years, the Black Lives Matter movement has drawn global attention to police violence and mass incarceration in the United States, all the while highlighting intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality. This course examines the social, historical, economic and political contexts for mass incarceration and police violence. Assigned readings tackle historical and theoretical bases for understanding the criminal justice system in the US. Drawing from black feminist, queer, transnational and Indigenous studies frameworks, we will question the foundations of the criminal justice system and its constructions of crime, justice and safety. Towards the end of the course, we will examine the alternative constructions of justice articulated by movements for prison abolition, transformative justice and community accountability.
1230:MWF   DENNY 304
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 219-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01. Gender roles and sexual identity are central to the transformations that define what it means to be modern in America between the late nineteenth- and mid-twentieth centuries. Artists across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, have engaged the ever-changing boundaries of male and female, straight and gay. They have taken up these boundaries in profound and ordinary ways, both in conscious and unintentional ways. Drawing upon recent scholarship in American art, this course analyzes the shifts in the work of artists from the lesser-known nineteenth-century gender-bending printmaker Ellen Day Hale to the visual culture surrounding the notorious Oscar Wilde and, in the twentieth century, the sexual politics of such famous artist couples as Georgia OKeeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. Prerequisites: 102 or WGST 100 or AMST 201 or permission of instructor.
1330:MR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 306-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern Japanese History
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 315-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course is an exploration of how sexuality and gender have been continually redefined and experienced throughout modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in eroticism, same-sex love, family structure, and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and how women and men frequently transgressed feminine and masculine ideals, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce a paper that analyzes the development of this new and exciting field of history.
1330:W   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 311-01 Chaucer's Women
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-03. Patient Griselda, sensual Alisoun, long-suffering Constance, the irrepressible Wife of Bath - in The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer provides a wide range of women who alternately uphold and challenge the medieval boundaries of femininity. In this class we will explore medieval conceptions of gender, sexuality, and authority by way of Chaucer's most memorable women, read alongside confessional manuals, scientific treatises, and religious tracts that provide insight into how medieval scholars conceptualized the differences between men and women.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 310-01 I Am Yours: Feminine Identity, Sexuality, and Power in Italian Cinema and Media
Instructor: Nicoletta Marini Maio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 323-01 and WGSS 301-02.Discussion Session for Italian and INBM students at a time TBD. In this course, we will analyze a number of movies, television programs, and commercials, from the 1950s to the present, that have concurred to the representation of the female body and sexuality as a strategic response to societal changes, including women's sexual liberation and economic advancement. By constructing a hyper-sexualized narrative of the feminine, this representation neutralized the threats posed by women's emancipation and redefined gender power relationships in the post-1968 socio-cultural context. Grounded in the intersections between feminist, post-feminist, film, and media studies perspectives, our analysis will focus on the notions of power and control.
1900:W   ALTHSE 106
1330:M   STUART 1104
FMST 320-03 Suicide and Transnational Violence
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-04. Popular representations of suicide often fixate on the question of why individuals commit suicide, reflecting narrow and pathologizing approaches. By contrast, through lectures, readings, discussions and film screenings, this course situates suicide in the context of transnational violence. This means that we will consider suicide as an effect of processes of colonization, slavery, nationalism, and capitalist globalization. Centering issues of gender and sexuality, the course will explore critical perspectives on suicide emerging from transnational, Indigenous, and postcolonial studies. Topics for discussion include Black/Indigenous suicide/murder in custody, South Asian women's suicides during the 1947 Partition of India, mass suicides and transatlantic slavery, and decolonial healing.
1030:MWF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-02 Race and Second Wave Feminism in the U.S.
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04 and WGSS 202-01. Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US examines the US's Second Wave feminist movement through the prism of multiracial and anti-racist feminist activism. Often, the Second Wave is thought of in terms of white-dominated groups, and many believe that key feminist organizations like the National Organization for Women (NOW) were founded by and served only white women. In fact, African American feminist powerhouses like Shirley Chisholm and Pauli Murray helped to found NOW, and women of color organized some of the earliest Second Wave groups. This class will focus on Chicana, American Indian, African American and multiracial feminist thinking and activism. Topics covered will include national organizations, such as the National Black Feminist Organization and Women of All Red Nations; grassroots groups, such as the Combahee River Collective; significant figures, such as Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzalda, and Barbara Smith; key campaigns like that against sterilization abuse; and the significant debates that defined the movement, such as the question of reform versus revolution. This course will also consider the centrality of oral history to the history of women.
1330:W   DENNY 112
HIST 315-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern Japanese History
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course is an exploration of how sexuality and gender have been continually redefined and experienced throughout modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in eroticism, same-sex love, family structure, and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and how women and men frequently transgressed feminine and masculine ideals, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce a paper that analyzes the development of this new and exciting field of history.
1330:W   DENNY 303
HIST 378-01 Society and the Sexes
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02. This is a reading seminar that investigates three separate but interrelated threads - the history of sexuality, the history of the body and the construction of gender - in both pre-industrial and modern Europe. The course explores how definitions of male/female and feminine/masculine have changed over time and how they shaped the life experiences of men and women. Readings will include medical opinions, legal texts, diaries, novels, and political debates. Offered every two or three years.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ITAL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ITAL 323-01 I Am Yours: Feminine Identity, Sexuality, and Power in Italian Cinema and Media
Instructor: Nicoletta Marini Maio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 310-01 and WGSS 301-02.Discussion Session for Italian and INBM students at a time TBD. In this course, we will analyze a number of movies, television programs, and commercials, from the 1950s to the present, that have concurred to the representation of the female body and sexuality as a strategic response to societal changes, including women's sexual liberation and economic advancement. By constructing a hyper-sexualized narrative of the feminine, this representation neutralized the threats posed by women's emancipation and redefined gender power relationships in the post-1968 socio-cultural context. Grounded in the intersections between feminist, post-feminist, film, and media studies perspectives, our analysis will focus on the notions of power and control.
1900:W   ALTHSE 106
1330:M   STUART 1104
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 240-01 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 250-02 and WGSS 201-02. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion and culture. Starting with the representation of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, we study the highly differentiated gender roles maintained by traditional Jewish culture, and examine the role American feminism has played in challenging those traditional roles. We will also study gender issues in contemporary Israeli society, such as the politics of marriage and divorce, public prayer and gender in the military. Some knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history is helpful, but not required as a prerequisite for this course.
1030:MWF   DENNY 104
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 135-01. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 135.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
PSYC 145-01 Psychology of Human Sexuality
Instructor: Peter Leavitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 102-01. This course is a study of human sexuality emphasizing psychological aspects. We will cover sexual development from childhood to adulthood, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual health, and the development of sexual relationships. The study of human sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary in nature (drawing from such varied disciplines as sociology, women's studies, biology, anthropology, history, and others). Although we will cover some material from these disciplines, we will take an explicitly social psychological perspective, focusing on individual, personal, and social aspects of sexual behaviors, attitudes and beliefs.
1330:MR   KAUF 179
PSYC 145-02 Psychology of Human Sexuality
Instructor: Peter Leavitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 102-02. This course is a study of human sexuality emphasizing psychological aspects. We will cover sexual development from childhood to adulthood, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual health, and the development of sexual relationships. The study of human sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary in nature (drawing from such varied disciplines as sociology, women's studies, biology, anthropology, history, and others). Although we will cover some material from these disciplines, we will take an explicitly social psychological perspective, focusing on individual, personal, and social aspects of sexual behaviors, attitudes and beliefs.
1500:MR   KAUF 179
PSYC 435-01 Gender and Sexual Identities
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01.In this seminar, we will discuss current psychological theory and research relating to gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual practices. The course is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in this field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed to evaluate research findings. We will discuss such topics as traditional and alternative gender identities; gender conformity and socialization in childhood; transgender and transsexual identities; the development of heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and queer identities; the coming out process; the relationship between gender and sexual orientation; social pressures and compulsory heterosexuality; heterosexism, homophobia, and the stigma and prejudice surrounding sexual minority identities and practices. This discussion-based course is designed to encourage deep, thoughtful analysis of issues surrounding gender and sexuality. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender and sexuality, focusing largely on social psychological and feminist research and theory. This is an advanced seminar that focuses in depth on special topics within these fields. Topics may include sexual identities, gender identities, romantic and sexual relationships, gender and violence, among others. Students will develop their understanding of these topical issues by reading and writing about primary sources and by participating in and leading class discussions. Cross-listed with WGSS 305. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 202 or 211 or WGSS 200.
1130:WF   ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 250-02 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 240-01 and WGSS 201-02. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion and culture. Starting with the representation of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, we study the highly differentiated gender roles maintained by traditional Jewish culture, and examine the role American feminism has played in challenging those traditional roles. We will also study gender issues in contemporary Israeli society, such as the politics of marriage and divorce, public prayer and gender in the military. Some knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history is helpful, but not required as a prerequisite for this course.
1030:MWF   DENNY 104
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 313-01 Contemporary Human Trafficking
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-01. This class will introduce students to contemporary issues of human trafficking in the United States and globally. Human trafficking, including both commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor, is an extremely complex crime and human rights violation that demands multi-faceted, interdisciplinary responses. After we develop an understanding of the definition and various manifestations of human trafficking, we will build on the US Governments 4Ps framework--prosecution, protection, prevention and partnership-- as a way to shape our investigation and inquiry. Topics for discussion will include demand, vulnerability factors, economic networks, governmental and non-governmental organization responses, criminal justice systems, support and services for survivors, prevention efforts, corporate social responsibility, and literary and cultural representations of human trafficking. Readings will include international, federal and state legislation, survivor narratives, research reports, white papers, news coverage, films, and novels.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
Courses Offered in THDA
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
THDA 316-01 Dance History Seminar: Modernism and the Body
Instructor: Sarah Skaggs
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-05. This course will focus on contemporary dance history using theoretical frameworks that interrogate how race, class and gender resist, assimilate, and converge to create the construction of American modern concert dance. We will explore how the politics of the dancing female body on the concert stage produced a radicalized agenda for contemporary dance. We will address key themes and questions throughout the semester, questions such as: What makes a body "modern?" How does the feminist agenda on the concert stage aid in the construction of a "modern" body? What was the role of appropriating from exotic cultures in the making of contemporary concert dance? What is the role of technology in the creation of modern dance? What are the effects of war and politics on the dancing body? Orientalism, the Africanist presence in Western concert dance, and the restaging of Native American dances by American choreographers will be addressed as part of the overall construction of American modern dance. Through response papers, in-class presentations, and an in-depth research paper, students will engage with significant issues contributing to the development of modern concert dance. Prerequisite: 102. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 301.
1330:MR   2527WH DANCE STU