Fall 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 100-01 Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Connie Devilbiss
Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 110
WGSS 101-01 LGBTQ Literature in the US
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-01.This course will explore how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference including race and classin literature by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer-identified (LGBTQ) authors, and authors who present LGBTQ characters and themes in their texts. Students will consider the impact of sexuality and gender on literature and experience. Our readings will include a rage of literary genres, such as essay, poetry, novel, drama, and film and we will focus on the interpretation of texts particularly through the lens of queer theory. Authors may include, among others: Gloria Anzalda, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Rich, Leslie Feinberg, Dorothy Allison, and Audre Lorde.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 08
WGSS 101-03 Southern Women Writers
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-04.A course in prose written by women of the American South. We will begin with the diary of Mary Chesnut written during the Civil War and continue with notable writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, which may include Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Zora Neale Hurston, Ellen Gilchrist, Ellen Douglas, Kaye Gibbons. Some critical and theoretical texts will also be required. Writing assignments will include short explications, longer essays, and an exam. Attendance and participation in class discussion are required.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 411
WGSS 101-04 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-07.This course studies American womens war writing from the US Civil War through the war on terror. We will ask: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, gender identity, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have womens lived experiences and changing social roles impacted the diverse genre of war writingand vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by writers including Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Toni Morrison, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
EASTC 411
WGSS 136-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 135-01. See course description with PSYC 135 listing. See course description with PSYC 135 listing.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 08
WGSS 136-02 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 135-02. See course description with PSYC 135 listing. See course description with PSYC 135 listing.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 207
WGSS 200-01 Feminist Practices, Writing and Research
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
Building upon the key concepts and modes of inquire introduced in the WGSS Introductory course, WGSS 200 deepens students understanding of how feminist perspectives on power, experience, and inequality uniquely shape how scholars approach research questions, writing practices, methods and knowledge production. Approaches may include feminist approaches to memoir, oral histories, grassroots and online activism, blogging, visual culture, ethnography, archival research, space, art, literary analysis, and policy studies.Prerequisite: 100 or 208, which can be taken concurrently.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 204
WGSS 202-01 Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 233-01.Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 311
WGSS 224-01 Reproductive Justice
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:
Reproductive Justice is a global social movement strategy and human rights platform that places reproductive power in the context of the larger social, racial and economic well-being of women, communities and families (Ross 2011). This course explores the origins and applications of reproductive justice. It investigates how the reproductive lives of many people, particularly women of color, are embedded in embattled legal, social, economic, racial and national frameworks that shape their capacity to control their intimate and procreative lives. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course first maps reproductive justices origins, exploring: political philosophies of sexual and reproductive liberty; racialized and disability-based histories of eugenics, population control, and adoption; the black womens health movement; birth control and abortion law; social welfare and healthcare politics; the reproductive politics of incarceration and state violence; disability and prenatal testing; and the transnational and LGBTQ applications of assisted reproductive technologies. The course will subsequently explore how reproductive justice platforms can enable diverse people to thrive: making the decision to prevent, terminate or have a pregnancy a real choice. It will assess the conditions that enable access to quality health care, economic security, racial justice, womens equality, transgender and queer rights, environmental sustainability, disability justice, sexual autonomy, and community vitality.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 304
WGSS 300-01 Feminist Perspectives and Theories
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:
This course deepens students understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform womens, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100 or 208.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 203
WGSS 301-01 Reimagining the Line: Contemporary Arts and Political Imagination at the Mexico-US Border
Instructor: Sebastian Antezana Quiroga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 385-01 and SPAN 385-01.This course explores contemporary literary works, film, and art from and/or about the Mexico-US border. Concentrating both on its political and aesthetic dimensions, the course focuses on the (imaginary and yet very real) divisive nature of the border, on the systematic exploitation of its gender and ethnic minorities, as well as on the many forms of freedom produced by border experiences and arts. Students will analyze how border writers and artists come up with rhetorical and political strategies that allow them to reimagine themselves and their bi-national territory, and to generate challenging notions of citizenship, nationhood, and culture to establish more fluid and socially responsible modes of representation. In particular, the course pays close attention to works and creators that understand the border experience as one of instability and hardship, but also as a form of ideological resistance, subversive power, and freedom. Following the rich linguistic complexities of the Mexico-US border, the course will be taught mostly in Spanish, but it will also offer a few texts and materials in Spanglish and in English. Students are encouraged to bring their own interests and experiences to the course.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
BOSLER 314
WGSS 301-02 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01.This course is part one of a yearlong exploration of the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. During the semester, we will trace Morrison's development as a novelist from 1970-2000, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical approaches as psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, and new historicism.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 07
WGSS 301-03 Female Leaders in Latin American History and Culture
Instructor: Andrea Lopez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 321-03.This course examines contemporary representations of Latin American female leaders from the 16th century to the 19th century. Students will learn about the origins and evolution of the representation of these characters over time. They will analyze and write about a wide range of materials including historical documents, works of literature, paintings, movies, music, and other forms of media production. The female leaders studied in this course will include Anacaona from Haiti, Malintzin from Mexico, Santa Rosa de Lima from Peru, Manuela Saenz from Ecuador, and Juana Azurduy from Bolivia/Argentina, among others. By the end of this course students will be able to define how female leaders became keystones for building their countries national identity and how their representation reflect the tensions and hopes of society.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 319
WGSS 301-04 Early/Modern Crossdressing and Transgression
Instructor: Amaury Leopoldo Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01 and THDA 320-01.Why did crossdressing feature so prominently in the literary, theatrical , and cultural texts of the Spanish Siglo de Oro? How did these gender-bending performances captivate the imagination of writers, readers, and theatergoers? What were the aesthetic, ethical, and political consequences of this practice? In this course, we unpack the construction and function of this figure, we examine the threat this tradition poses, and we analyze these transgressions in light of early modern and contemporary theories gender and sexuality. While our primary cases are from Spain (Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Pedro Caldern de la Barca, Mara de Zayas y Sotomayor, and Ana Caro Malln de Soto), we compare these to examples from Spanish America (Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz), England (William Shakespeare), and contemporary television and film representations. Throughout, we consider questions of womanhood, desire, honor, vengeance, marriage, religion, nationalism, sovereignty, and resistance. This course will be taught in English with the option for FLIC.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 208
WGSS 302-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 351-01 and INST 351-01.This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 206
WGSS 302-02 Gender Identity & International Human Rights Law
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-01.This course examines the intersection of gender identity, gender violence, and international human rights laws. It explores the definitions of gender identities and their protections (or lack of) in main international human rights texts. Through the lens of gender and legal feminist theories, this course examines various human rights such as the right to equality and non-discrimination based on sex, the right to privacy and family life, the right to peace and clean environment. It studies cases of war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment, and enforced disappearance of persons. This course offers a transnational legal perspective and gives examples from different legal traditions (common law and civil law) and different countries.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 208
WGSS 306-01 The Psychology of Rape and Sexual Aggression
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 435-01.Permission of Instructor Required.In this advanced seminar, we will examine psychological theory and research relating to rape and sexual aggression. We will begin by considering the impact of the social construction of masculinity and femininity on sexual relationships. We will then explore the relationship between these gender ideologies and understandings of sexual consent. With this foundation in place, we will examine the psychology of sexual aggression perpetration, victimization, and bystander intervention. Additional topics may include sexual violence in same-sex relationships, sexual violence on college campuses, and rape prevention and education programs.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 304
WGSS 351-01 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 221-01 and WRPG 211-01.Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 410
WGSS 351-03 Sexual Deviance and Social Change
Instructor: Todd Nordgren
Course Description:
In 1880s England, a panic gripped the city of Londonhomosexuality seemed to be on the rise, threatening the public and moral health of the nation. Laws were passed to protect the public health against moral, physical, and mental degradation, and the British public and medical experts became increasingly interested in sexology, a new scientific field founded in Germany. The 1980s saw a similar outcry against sexual vice as the AIDS crisis reached its climax in the United States, where the disease was first known as the gay cancer. These two periods, separated by a hundred years, share surprising correspondences that reveal how the public, experts, and politicians create and conflate moral panics with public health scares and how queer communities resist efforts to malign them based on their sexuality. This course will look to a variety a of cultural objects, activist moments, and scientific texts that respond to the sexual panics of these two eras, from literature such as Oscar Wildes 1890 short novel The Picture of Dorian Grey and Tony Kushners 1991 play Angels in America to medical case studies by early sexologists and 80s medical researchers. We will devote the first two thirds of the course to case studies of these two disparate moments, and then will turn to a comparative approach for the remainder of the course, asking why sexuality is so often linked with vice and crime and how recent health scares are shaped by moral histories extending well beyond their immediate context.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, MW
DENNY 315
WGSS 550-01 Independent Research Study on Sexuality
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:

Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 320-01 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-02.This course is part one of a yearlong exploration of the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. During the semester, we will trace Morrison's development as a novelist from 1970-2000, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical approaches as psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, and new historicism.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 07
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 351-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 351-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion. Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as INST 351& WGSS 302.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 206
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 LGBTQ Literature in the US
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01.This course will explore how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference including race and classin literature by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer-identified (LGBTQ) authors, and authors who present LGBTQ characters and themes in their texts. Students will consider the impact of sexuality and gender on literature and experience. Our readings will include a rage of literary genres, such as essay, poetry, novel, drama, and film and we will focus on the interpretation of texts particularly through the lens of queer theory. Authors may include, among others: Gloria Anzalda, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Rich, Leslie Feinberg, Dorothy Allison, and Audre Lorde.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 08
ENGL 101-04 Southern Women Writers
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-03.A course in prose written by women of the American South. We will begin with the diary of Mary Chesnut written during the Civil War and continue with notable writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, which may include Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Zora Neale Hurston, Ellen Gilchrist, Ellen Douglas, Kaye Gibbons. Some critical and theoretical texts will also be required. Writing assignments will include short explications, longer essays, and an exam. Attendance and participation in class discussion are required.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-07 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-04.This course studies American womens war writing from the US Civil War through the war on terror. We will ask: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, gender identity, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have womens lived experiences and changing social roles impacted the diverse genre of war writingand vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by writers including Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Toni Morrison, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
EASTC 411
ENGL 221-01 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 351-02 and WRPG 211-01.Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 410
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 351-01 Gender and Development
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 351-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as ECON 351 & WGSS 302. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.Prerequisite: For ECON 351: ECON 288; For INST 351: ECON 288 or INST 200 or INBM 200; For WGSS 302: at least one WGSS course or ECON 288. This course is cross-listed as ECON 351 & WGSS 302.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 206
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 385-01 Reimagining the Line: Contemporary Arts and Political Imagination at the Mexico-US Border
Instructor: Sebastian Antezana Quiroga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 385-01 and WGSS 301-01.This course explores contemporary literary works, film, and art from and/or about the Mexico-US border. Concentrating both on its political and aesthetic dimensions, the course focuses on the (imaginary and yet very real) divisive nature of the border, on the systematic exploitation of its gender and ethnic minorities, as well as on the many forms of freedom produced by border experiences and arts. Students will analyze how border writers and artists come up with rhetorical and political strategies that allow them to reimagine themselves and their bi-national territory, and to generate challenging notions of citizenship, nationhood, and culture to establish more fluid and socially responsible modes of representation. In particular, the course pays close attention to works and creators that understand the border experience as one of instability and hardship, but also as a form of ideological resistance, subversive power, and freedom. Following the rich linguistic complexities of the Mexico-US border, the course will be taught mostly in Spanish, but it will also offer a few texts and materials in Spanglish and in English. Students are encouraged to bring their own interests and experiences to the course.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 290-01 Gender Identity & International Human Rights Law
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02.This course examines the intersection of gender identity, gender violence, and international human rights laws. It explores the definitions of gender identities and their protections (or lack of) in main international human rights texts. Through the lens of gender and legal feminist theories, this course examines various human rights such as the right to equality and non-discrimination based on sex, the right to privacy and family life, the right to peace and clean environment. It studies cases of war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment, and enforced disappearance of persons. This course offers a transnational legal perspective and gives examples from different legal traditions (common law and civil law) and different countries.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 233-01 Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-01. Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.This course is cross-listed as WGSS 202. Prerequisite: 120 or AP credit equivalent. Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.This course is cross-listed as WGSS 202. Prerequisite: 120 or AP credit equivalent.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 311
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 136-01. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 136. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 136.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
ALTHSE 08
PSYC 135-02 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 136-02. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 136. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 136.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 207
PSYC 435-01 The Psychology of Rape and Sexual Aggression
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 306-01.Permission of Instructor Required.In this advanced seminar, we will examine psychological theory and research relating to rape and sexual aggression. We will begin by considering the impact of the social construction of masculinity and femininity on sexual relationships. We will then explore the relationship between these gender ideologies and understandings of sexual consent. With this foundation in place, we will examine the psychology of sexual aggression perpetration, victimization, and bystander intervention. Additional topics may include sexual violence in same-sex relationships, sexual violence on college campuses, and rape prevention and education programs.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 304
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-03 Female Leaders in Latin American History and Culture
Instructor: Andrea Lopez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-03.This course examines contemporary representations of Latin American female leaders from the 16th century to the 19th century. Students will learn about the origins and evolution of the representation of these characters over time. They will analyze and write about a wide range of materials including historical documents, works of literature, paintings, movies, music, and other forms of media production. The female leaders studied in this course will include Anacaona from Haiti, Malintzin from Mexico, Santa Rosa de Lima from Peru, Manuela Saenz from Ecuador, and Juana Azurduy from Bolivia/Argentina, among others. By the end of this course students will be able to define how female leaders became keystones for building their countries national identity and how their representation reflect the tensions and hopes of society.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 319
SPAN 380-01 Early/Modern Crossdressing and Transgression
Instructor: Amaury Leopoldo Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-04 and THDA 302-01.Why did crossdressing feature so prominently in the literary, theatrical , and cultural texts of the Spanish Siglo de Oro? How did these gender-bending performances captivate the imagination of writers, readers, and theatergoers? What were the aesthetic, ethical, and political consequences of this practice? In this course, we unpack the construction and function of this figure, we examine the threat this tradition poses, and we analyze these transgressions in light of early modern and contemporary theories gender and sexuality. While our primary cases are from Spain (Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Pedro Caldern de la Barca, Mara de Zayas y Sotomayor, and Ana Caro Malln de Soto), we compare these to examples from Spanish America (Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz), England (William Shakespeare), and contemporary television and film representations. Throughout, we consider questions of womanhood, desire, honor, vengeance, marriage, religion, nationalism, sovereignty, and resistance. This course will be taught in English with the option for FLIC.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 208
SPAN 385-01 Reimagining the Line: Contemporary Arts and Political Imagination at the Mexico-US Border
Instructor: Sebastian Antezana Quiroga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 385-01 and WGSS 301-01.This course explores contemporary literary works, film, and art from and/or about the Mexico-US border. Concentrating both on its political and aesthetic dimensions, the course focuses on the (imaginary and yet very real) divisive nature of the border, on the systematic exploitation of its gender and ethnic minorities, as well as on the many forms of freedom produced by border experiences and arts. Students will analyze how border writers and artists come up with rhetorical and political strategies that allow them to reimagine themselves and their bi-national territory, and to generate challenging notions of citizenship, nationhood, and culture to establish more fluid and socially responsible modes of representation. In particular, the course pays close attention to works and creators that understand the border experience as one of instability and hardship, but also as a form of ideological resistance, subversive power, and freedom. Following the rich linguistic complexities of the Mexico-US border, the course will be taught mostly in Spanish, but it will also offer a few texts and materials in Spanglish and in English. Students are encouraged to bring their own interests and experiences to the course.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in THDA
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
THDA 302-01 Early/Modern Crossdressing and Transgression
Instructor: Amaury Leopoldo Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-04 and SPAN 380-01.Why did crossdressing feature so prominently in the literary, theatrical , and cultural texts of the Spanish Siglo de Oro? How did these gender-bending performances captivate the imagination of writers, readers, and theatergoers? What were the aesthetic, ethical, and political consequences of this practice? In this course, we unpack the construction and function of this figure, we examine the threat this tradition poses, and we analyze these transgressions in light of early modern and contemporary theories gender and sexuality. While our primary cases are from Spain (Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Pedro Caldern de la Barca, Mara de Zayas y Sotomayor, and Ana Caro Malln de Soto), we compare these to examples from Spanish America (Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz), England (William Shakespeare), and contemporary television and film representations. Throughout, we consider questions of womanhood, desire, honor, vengeance, marriage, religion, nationalism, sovereignty, and resistance. This course will be taught in English with the option for FLIC.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in WRPG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WRPG 211-01 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 221-01 and WGSS 351-01.Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 410