Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 100-01 Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Jessica Vooris
Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
0930:MWF   DENNY 303
WGSS 101-01 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-01. This course studies American womens war writing from the Civil War through the war on terror. Our guiding questions include: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have women's intersectional experiences and changing social roles impacted the genre of war writing, and vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Naomi Shihab Nye, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
1330:TF   EASTC 411
WGSS 101-02 Disorderly Women
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-02. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a disorderly woman and what acts are considered disorderly and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American womens narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyonc. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of disorderly women have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.
1330:TF   DENNY 311
WGSS 101-03 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 101-01.An introduction to Western philosophy with a focus on issues surrounding sex and gender. What is rape culture, and how does it work? Do we have free will? What roles do sex, gender, and race play in making us who we are? Do we have a political obligation to be gender non-binary? Do our gender roles affect what we can know?
1030:TR   EASTC 411
WGSS 101-04 Letters and Literature
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-06.From personal messages sent by post to emails and texts today, correspondence has been an importance source of connection and self-expression. But are personal letters literature? How has the letter form influenced literary texts? And how do letters clarify literary questions of time, material, privacy, and power (among other issues)? This class will read letters and letter-indebted work from the last two and a half centuriesincluding fiction, nonfiction, and poemsto think about what letters are and what letters do.
0900:TR   EASTC 411
WGSS 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 135-01. See course description with PSYC 135 listing.
1500:TF   DENNY 104
WGSS 201-01 Goddesses, Prostitutes, Wives, Saints, and Rulers: Women and European Art 1200-1680
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 216-01. How has the representation of women been constructed, idealized, vilified, manipulated, sexualized, and gendered during what could be broadly called the "Renaissance" in Europe? How have female artists, such as Sofanisba Anguissola (1532-1625) or Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653), among others, represented themselves, men, and other familiar subjects differently from their male counterparts? How have female rulers, like Queen Elizabeth I of England, controlled their own political and cultural self-fashioning through portraiture? What role do the lives and writings of female mystics, like Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) or Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) play in depictions of their physical and spiritual identity? How was beauty and sexuality conceived through the imagery of mythological women, like Venus, or culturally ambivalent women, like courtesans and prostitutes? What kind of art did wealthy, aristocratic women or nuns pay for and use? Through studying primary texts, scholarly literature, and relevant theoretical sources, we will address these and other issues in art produced in Italy, France, Spain, Northern Europe, and England from 1200-1680. The course will be grounded in an understanding of historical and cultural contexts, and students will develop paper topics based on their own interests in consultation with the professor. A screening of the documentary film, "A Woman Like That" (2009), on the life of Artemisia Gentileschi and a trip to the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. will take place during the second half of the semester.
1330:TF   WEISS 221
WGSS 201-02 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 240-01 and RELG 250-01. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion and culture. Starting with the representation of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, we study the highly differentiated gender roles maintained by traditional Jewish culture, and examine the role American feminism has played in challenging those traditional roles. We will also study gender issues in contemporary Israeli society, such as the politics of marriage and divorce, public prayer and gender in the military. Some knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history is helpful, but not required as a prerequisite for this course.
0930:MW   DENNY 103
WGSS 201-03 Philosophy of Race & Gender
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-01.Is race real? Is gender? This course addresses these and related philosophical questions like, Why do we think in terms of race and gender, and Would a society without race or gender be better off?
1500:MR   EASTC 314
WGSS 201-04 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01 and MEST 200-01. This course focuses on women's stories from the Middle East with particular attention to zones of armed conflict. It examines questions related to gender representations, sexual identity, and trauma through various reading materials (comics or graphic novels, novels and poems) and visual materials (film/photography).
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
WGSS 201-05 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Toni Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-03.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality. During the semester, we will analyze works by Mariana Enrquez, Samantha Schweblin, Amparo Dvila, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Paco Plaza (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
WGSS 202-01 Native American Queer and Two-Spirit Studies
Instructor: Nikki Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-03. There are over 250 Indigenous languages across North America that have words to describe what we call LGBTQ today. One such term Niizh manidoowag, is an Anishinaabeg term that translates in English to two-spirit, and typically refers to a person whose body simultaneously houses a masculine spirit and a feminine spirit. In 1990, the participants of the 3rd annual Inter-Tribal Native American/First Nations Gay/Lesbian American conference adopted the English term two-spirit to refer to people who identify both as LGBTQ and as Native or Indigenous North American. Over the last two decades Queer Indigenous and Two-Spirit studies have made important contributions both to Native American and Indigenous Studies, and to the resurgence of Native and Indigenous communities throughout North America. In this course we will discuss Native North American genders, gender roles, sexualities and relationships. Emphasis will be placed on the intersection of patriarchy, settler colonialism, and Western constructions of gender binaries to understand how these Western structures and institutions negatively impacted the traditional roles, integration and acceptance of two-spirit Native people within their communities and nations. We will also discuss the current call by Two-Spirit communities for the decolonization and unsettling of settler colonial gender/sexuality on Native lands. To this end, we will explore the importance of peoplehood, kinship, relational accountability and resurgence of more holistic, inclusive sense identity within Native communities reservation and urban. Towards the end of the semester, we will discuss the importance of queer Indigenous theory/studies as a methods of analysis and decolonization, and the relevance and applicability of Two-Spirit and Queer Indigenous theory to other academic disciplines.
1230:MWF   DENNY 212
WGSS 202-02 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 214-02 and SOCI 230-03. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
WGSS 202-03 Families and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 224-01. In this comparative course in family systems, we will study the impact of production and politics on family life in various cultures, including Africa, Latin America, the Far East and the United States. The course uses ethnographic studies and documentaries to illuminate the impact of the political economy on family life, the life course, and gender roles and relationships. Various theories of development will place the ethnographies into socio-political and historical context.
1030:TR   DENNY 304
WGSS 202-04 Divas, Dudes, and Dandies: Anthropology and Global Masculinities
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01. What is masculinity? What makes you a man? As a society, we normally get around these questions by telling ourselves that we know what a man is when we see one, and that masculinity and/or male genitals makes a man. But is that all there is to it? This course seeks to answer these questions that have been sparking debates since at least the 1950s. The class will uncover masculinity as a rich terrain for anthropological analysis, giving students the opportunity to ask questions about the ways that masculinity is embodied and expressed across cultures and used to contest and re-establish dominant ways of seeing the world. Our mapping of masculinities from around the globe will take us from the NYC apartments of Filipino gay immigrant men (Divas) to the warrior-making ceremonies of Native Hawaiian men, and from a working-class high school in California (Dudes) to Cape Town, South Africa, where Congolese immigrant men (Dandies) treat fashion as a project of social mobility.
1130:MWF   DENNY 204
WGSS 202-05 Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 233-01.Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.
1500:TF   DENNY 304
WGSS 208-01 Introduction to Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Jessica Vooris
Course Description:
This course explores how practices, identities, behaviors, and representations of sexualities shape and are shaped by political, cultural, social, religious, medical and economic practices of societies across time and space. It will put sexuality at the center of analysis, but will develop understandings of sexuality as they are related to sex, gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, nationality and geographical location. Students will explore the historical and social processes through which diverse behaviors are and are not designated as sexual. They will then analyze how these designations influence a range of institutional forces and social phenomena. Possible topics include: medicine, environmentalism, colonialism and nation-building, STI and HIV transmission, public health campaigns, art and literary production, visual and popular culture, community development, family structure, human rights frameworks, and law or policy.
0900:TR   DENNY 21
WGSS 301-01 Music, Gender, and Performance
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 210-01. This course examines relationships between gender, music, and performance from an interdisciplinary perspective (music and sound studies, ethnomusicology, gender and queer theory, performance studies). We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience drawing on musical examples from a diverse range of genres, traditions, historical moments, and socio-cultural contexts. Some questions we consider include: To what extent is participation in particular musical cultures or scenes dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? What might the voice tell us about gender or sexuality? What might music tell us about the body? What is the relationship between performance and the ways in which social attitudes about masculinity and femininity, homosexuality and heterosexuality are shaped? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially speak for particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure? Class discussions will focus on careful readings of the assigned texts and listening/viewing assignments.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
WGSS 301-02 Representations of Trans Identities
Instructor: Jessica Vooris
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 320-01. It is said that we have reached a "transgender tipping" point regarding trans representation in the media over the last ten years, as trans people in the United States and around the world have become increasingly visible to a public audience. This course challenges the idea that trans people are a "new" twenty-first century phenomenon and introduces students to examples of gender non-conformity and transgender identities across time and cultures. The first half of the course examines representations of trans people within sexology, psychology, the medical archive, and the mainstream media, while the second half delves more deeply into material created by trans people themselves. We will read memoirs and comics, watch films, and listen to podcasts produced for, by, and about trans people.
1330:MR   DENNY 21
WGSS 302-01 Babies and Boomers: East Asian Societies in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 345-01 and EASN 306-01.Students who have previously taken ANTH 245/EASN 206 Babies and Boomers cannot take/receive credit for this class. For much of the 20th century, East Asia was known as a region of the young. In the past few decades, however, the region has grown markedly older. Countries like China, which used to be concerned about having too many people, now worry about not having enough people to sustain a larger population of seniors. This course examines the causes and consequences of declining fertility and population aging in East Asia. It looks at the impact of changing population composition on attitudes toward reproduction, marriage, family, and gender in the region, particularly in China and Japan. Course materials draw primarily from the work of anthropologists and historians. By the end of the semester, students will complete a research paper on issues related to demographic change in the region.
1330:W   STERN 7
WGSS 302-02 African Women's History
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and HIST 374-01. This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa.
1330:TF   DENNY 315
WGSS 302-03 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 327-01. Exploring the interactions between religious and gender and sexuality, this course examines: how various religious traditions perceive sexuality and gender; the ways in which religion influences social policy both within the United States and globally; and the impact this has on individuals, families, and societies. The course focuses on contemporary concerns, while offering a comparative (historical and cross-cultural) introduction to these issues across several religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to religious fundamentalisms across the three major monotheistic religions:Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Prerequisites: Either 110, 222, 224, 228 or 310, or one course from WGSS or RELG, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TR   CCLA SEM
WGSS 305-01 Seminar in Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 435-01. See course description with Psychology 435 listing. Prerequisites or co-requisite: 200 or PSYC 202 or 211, or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   BOSLER 214
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
All topics will draw upon the knowledge of the history and theories of feminism and will be interdisciplinary in nature. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 100, 200 and 300 or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   DENNY 315
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 320-02 African Women's History
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 374-01 and WGSS 302-02. This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa.
1330:TF   DENNY 315
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-02 Disorderly Women
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-02. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a disorderly woman and what acts are considered disorderly and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American womens narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyonc. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of disorderly women have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.
1330:TF   DENNY 311
AMST 200-03 Native American Queer and Two-Spirit Studies
Instructor: Nikki Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-01. There are over 250 Indigenous languages across North America that have words to describe what we call LGBTQ today. One such term Niizh manidoowag, is an Anishinaabeg term that translates in English to two-spirit, and typically refers to a person whose body simultaneously houses a masculine spirit and a feminine spirit. In 1990, the participants of the 3rd annual Inter-Tribal Native American/First Nations Gay/Lesbian American conference adopted the English term two-spirit to refer to people who identify both as LGBTQ and as Native or Indigenous North American. Over the last two decades Queer Indigenous and Two-Spirit studies have made important contributions both to Native American and Indigenous Studies, and to the resurgence of Native and Indigenous communities throughout North America. In this course we will discuss Native North American genders, gender roles, sexualities and relationships. Emphasis will be placed on the intersection of patriarchy, settler colonialism, and Western constructions of gender binaries to understand how these Western structures and institutions negatively impacted the traditional roles, integration and acceptance of two-spirit Native people within their communities and nations. We will also discuss the current call by Two-Spirit communities for the decolonization and unsettling of settler colonial gender/sexuality on Native lands. To this end, we will explore the importance of peoplehood, kinship, relational accountability and resurgence of more holistic, inclusive sense identity within Native communities reservation and urban. Towards the end of the semester, we will discuss the importance of queer Indigenous theory/studies as a methods of analysis and decolonization, and the relevance and applicability of Two-Spirit and Queer Indigenous theory to other academic disciplines.
1230:MWF   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 245-01 Divas, Dudes, and Dandies: Anthropology and Global Masculinities
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-04. What is masculinity? What makes you a man? As a society, we normally get around these questions by telling ourselves that we know what a man is when we see one, and that masculinity and/or male genitals makes a man. But is that all there is to it? This course seeks to answer these questions that have been sparking debates since at least the 1950s. The class will uncover masculinity as a rich terrain for anthropological analysis, giving students the opportunity to ask questions about the ways that masculinity is embodied and expressed across cultures and used to contest and re-establish dominant ways of seeing the world. Our mapping of masculinities from around the globe will take us from the NYC apartments of Filipino gay immigrant men (Divas) to the warrior-making ceremonies of Native Hawaiian men, and from a working-class high school in California (Dudes) to Cape Town, South Africa, where Congolese immigrant men (Dandies) treat fashion as a project of social mobility.
1130:MWF   DENNY 204
ANTH 345-01 Babies and Boomers: East Asian Societies in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and WGSS 302-01.Students who have previously taken ANTH 245/EASN 206 Babies and Boomers cannot take/receive credit for this class. For much of the 20th century, East Asia was known as a region of the young. In the past few decades, however, the region has grown markedly older. Countries like China, which used to be concerned about having too many people, now worry about not having enough people to sustain a larger population of seniors. This course examines the causes and consequences of declining fertility and population aging in East Asia. It looks at the impact of changing population composition on attitudes toward reproduction, marriage, family, and gender in the region, particularly in China and Japan. Course materials draw primarily from the work of anthropologists and historians. By the end of the semester, students will complete a research paper on issues related to demographic change in the region.
1330:W   STERN 7
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 216-01 Goddesses, Prostitutes, Wives, Saints, and Rulers: Women and European Art 1200-1680
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01. How has the representation of women been constructed, idealized, vilified, manipulated, sexualized, and gendered during what could be broadly called the Renaissance in Europe? How have female artists, such as Sofanisba Anguissola (1532-1625) or Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653), among others, represented themselves, men, and other familiar subjects differently from their male counterparts? How have female rulers, like Queen Elizabeth I of England, controlled their own political and cultural self-fashioning through portraiture? What role do the lives and writings of female mystics, like Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) or Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) play in depictions of their physical and spiritual identity? How was beauty and sexuality conceived through the imagery of mythological women, like Venus, or culturally ambivalent women, like courtesans and prostitutes? What kind of art did wealthy, aristocratic women or nuns pay for and use? Through studying primary texts, scholarly literature, and relevant theoretical sources, we will address these and other issues in art produced in Italy, France, Spain, Northern Europe, and England from 1200-1680. The course will be grounded in an understanding of historical and cultural contexts, and students will develop paper topics based on their own interests in consultation with the professor. A screening of the documentary film, A Woman Like That (2009), on the life of Artemisia Gentileschi and a trip to the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. will take place during the second half of the semester. Offered every year.
1330:TF   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 306-01 Babies and Boomers: East Asian Societies in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 345-01 and WGSS 302-01.Students who have previously taken ANTH 245/EASN 206 Babies and Boomers cannot take/receive credit for this class. For much of the 20th century, East Asia was known as a region of the young. In the past few decades, however, the region has grown markedly older. Countries like China, which used to be concerned about having too many people, now worry about not having enough people to sustain a larger population of seniors. This course examines the causes and consequences of declining fertility and population aging in East Asia. It looks at the impact of changing population composition on attitudes toward reproduction, marriage, family, and gender in the region, particularly in China and Japan. Course materials draw primarily from the work of anthropologists and historians. By the end of the semester, students will complete a research paper on issues related to demographic change in the region.
1330:W   STERN 7
Courses Offered in ECON
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 214-02 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-03 and WGSS 202-02. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01. This course studies American womens war writing from the Civil War through the war on terror. Our guiding questions include: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have women's intersectional experiences and changing social roles impacted the genre of war writing, and vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Naomi Shihab Nye, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
1330:TF   EASTC 411
Courses Offered in FMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FMST 320-01 Representations of Trans Identities
Instructor: Jessica Vooris
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-02. It is said that we have reached a "transgender tipping" point regarding trans representation in the media over the last ten years, as trans people in the United States and around the world have become increasingly visible to a public audience. This course challenges the idea that trans people are a "new" twenty-first century phenomenon and introduces students to examples of gender non-conformity and transgender identities across time and cultures. The first half of the course examines representations of trans people within sexology, psychology, the medical archive, and the mainstream media, while the second half delves more deeply into material created by trans people themselves. We will read memoirs and comics, watch films, and listen to podcasts produced for, by, and about trans people.
1330:MR   DENNY 21
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 364-01 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01 and WGSS 201-04. This course focuses on women's stories from the Middle East with particular attention to zones of armed conflict. It examines questions related to gender representations, sexual identity, and trauma through various reading materials (comics or graphic novels, novels and poems) and visual materials (film/photography).
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 374-01 African Women's History
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02 and AFST 320-02. This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa. Offered every two years.
1330:TF   DENNY 315
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 240-01 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-02 and RELG 250-01. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion and culture. Starting with the representation of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, we study the highly differentiated gender roles maintained by traditional Jewish culture, and examine the role American feminism has played in challenging those traditional roles. We will also study gender issues in contemporary Israeli society, such as the politics of marriage and divorce, public prayer and gender in the military. Some knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history is helpful, but not required as a prerequisite for this course.
0930:MW   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 200-01 Women of the Middle East: Stories of Resistance
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01 and WGSS 201-04. This course focuses on women's stories from the Middle East with particular attention to zones of armed conflict. It examines questions related to gender representations, sexual identity, and trauma through various reading materials (comics or graphic novels, novels and poems) and visual materials (film/photography).
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in MUAC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUAC 210-01 Music, Gender, and Performance
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-01. This course examines relationships between gender, music, and performance from an interdisciplinary perspective (music and sound studies, ethnomusicology, gender and queer theory, performance studies). We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience drawing on musical examples from a diverse range of genres, traditions, historical moments, and socio-cultural contexts. Some questions we consider include: To what extent is participation in particular musical cultures or scenes dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? What might the voice tell us about gender or sexuality? What might music tell us about the body? What is the relationship between performance and the ways in which social attitudes about masculinity and femininity, homosexuality and heterosexuality are shaped? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially speak for particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure? Class discussions will focus on careful readings of the assigned texts and listening/viewing assignments.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-03.An introduction to Western philosophy with a focus on issues surrounding sex and gender. What is rape culture, and how does it work? Do we have free will? What roles do sex, gender, and race play in making us who we are? Do we have a political obligation to be gender non-binary? Do our gender roles affect what we can know? An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1030:TR   EASTC 411
PHIL 261-01 Philosophy of Race & Gender
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-03.Is race real? Is gender? This course addresses these and related philosophical questions like, Why do we think in terms of race and gender, and Would a society without race or gender be better off?
1500:MR   EASTC 314
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 233-01 Gender, Politics, and Policy in the U.S.
Instructor: Katie Marchetti
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-05. Overview of gender and politics in the United States. Examines the roles women play in the U.S. policy process, how public policies are "gendered", and how specific policies compare to feminist thinking about related issue areas. The course also discusses gender-based differences in political participation inside and outside of government.This course is cross-listed as WGSS 202. Prerequisite: 120 or AP credit equivalent.
1500:TF   DENNY 304
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 135-01. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 135.
1500:TF   DENNY 104
PSYC 435-01 Seminar in Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender and sexuality, focusing largely on social psychological and feminist research and theory. This is an advanced seminar that focuses in depth on special topics within these fields. Topics may include sexual identities, gender identities, romantic and sexual relationships, gender and violence, among others. Students will develop their understanding of these topical issues by reading and writing about primary sources and by participating in and leading class discussions. Cross-listed with WGSS 305. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 202 or 211 or WGSS 200.
1030:TR   BOSLER 214
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 250-01 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 240-01 and WGSS 201-02. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion and culture. Starting with the representation of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, we study the highly differentiated gender roles maintained by traditional Jewish culture, and examine the role American feminism has played in challenging those traditional roles. We will also study gender issues in contemporary Israeli society, such as the politics of marriage and divorce, public prayer and gender in the military. Some knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history is helpful, but not required as a prerequisite for this course.
0930:MW   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 224-01 Families and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-03. In this comparative course in family systems, we will study the impact of production and politics on family life in various cultures, including Africa, Latin America, the Far East and the United States. The course uses ethnographic studies and documentaries to illuminate the impact of the political economy on family life, the life course, and gender roles and relationships. Various theories of development will place the ethnographies into socio-political and historical context.
1030:TR   DENNY 304
SOCI 230-03 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 214-02 and WGSS 202-02. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
SOCI 327-01 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-03. Exploring the interactions between religious and gender and sexuality, this course examines: how various religious traditions perceive sexuality and gender; the ways in which religion influences social policy both within the United States and globally; and the impact this has on individuals, families, and societies. The course focuses on contemporary concerns, while offering a comparative (historical and cross-cultural) introduction to these issues across several religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to religious fundamentalisms across the three major monotheistic religions:Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Prerequisites: Either 110, 222, 224, 228 or 310, or one course from WGSS or RELG, or permission of the instructor. Offered every two years.
1500:TR   CCLA SEM
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-03 Monsters and Other Worlds. Tales and Themes of the Supernatural through Women’s Narratives
Instructor: Toni Rivas Bonillo
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-05.The primary goal of this course is to develop students' writing skills in Spanish. This course will focus on stories, films, and other cultural artifacts that explore alternative representations of reality. During the semester, we will analyze works by Mariana Enrquez, Samantha Schweblin, Amparo Dvila, Patricia Esteban Erls, Julio Cortzar, Remedios Varo, and Paco Plaza (among others). Students will learn about social, political, and cultural contexts necessary to illuminate themes and contexts related to the different course materials and to shape critical responses to works in the fantastic genre. Among other questions, the course will seek to understand how the different types of fantasy work, why writers explore horror and fear, and what lies behind the creation of monsters and supernatural entities. A special emphasis of the course will be the work of women authors. Among other issues, discussions, activities, and writing assignments will deal with the stereotyping female characters and their roles in fantastic fiction as well as how these conventional tropes have been challenged by women creators. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313