Fall 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 100-01 Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
One in person meeting of the full class each week, and one synchronous online meeting each week. Note: the first few weeks may be fully in person. This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
1330:MR   DIST
WGSS 101-01 Disorderly Women
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-01.The class will be offered synchronous and I will also hold office hours as such. I will place various instructional/informational videos further explaining writing assignments and other assignments on Moodle. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a disorderly woman and what acts are considered disorderly and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American womens narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyonc. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of disorderly women have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.
1330:MR   DIST
WGSS 135-02 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 135-02.One synchronous meeting each week via Zoom. See course description with PSYC 135 listing.
1330:TF   DIST
WGSS 200-01 Feminist Practices, Writing and Research
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
We will meet as a whole class on Tuesdays from 10:30-11:45. We will meet in smaller groups on half of the Thursdays (dates in syllabus) from 10:30-11:45. Building upon the key concepts and modes of inquire introduced in the WGSS Introductory course, WGSS 200 deepens students understanding of how feminist perspectives on power, experience, and inequality uniquely shape how scholars approach research questions, writing practices, methods and knowledge production. Approaches may include feminist approaches to memoir, oral histories, grassroots and online activism, blogging, visual culture, ethnography, archival research, space, art, literary analysis, and policy studies.Prerequisite: 100, which can be taken concurrently.
1030:TR   DIST
WGSS 201-02 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 219-01.Synchronous classes on Zoom
1500:MR   DIST
WGSS 220-01 History of American Feminism
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01 and HIST 211-03.We will meet on Zoom every Monday from 1:30-2:45. We will meet periodically on Thursdays (dates in syllabus) from 1:30-2:45 on Zoom. This course will emphasize such topics as the 19th century women's movement, the suffrage movement, radical and liberal feminism, and African-American feminism. We will pay particular attention to the diversity of women's experiences in the United States and to women's multiple and often conflicting responses to patriarchy and other forms of oppression. Prerequisite: One course in WGSS or HIST or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   DIST
WGSS 300-01 Feminist Perspectives and Theories
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
The class will meet synchronously (T/Th 9:00-10:15) each class period for the first few weeks, and then will likely transition to one synchronous class per week depending on the needs of the class. This course deepens students understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform womens, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100.
0900:TR   DIST
WGSS 301-01 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and ENGL 321-02. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
1030:TR   DIST
WGSS 301-02 Sex in the City of Light: Early 20th-Century Women in Paris
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-01 and FREN 364-01. This course in comparative literature and visual culture investigates the city of Paris as a site of sexual and artistic exploration, liberation and confrontation for women of the early 20th-Century. Students will study a variety of literature, visual art, performance art, and haute couture created and produced by women from diverse backgrounds who came to Paris in search of free self-expression. Most of these writers, journalists, artists, dancers, and designers knew each other; many collaborated professionally and mingled socially; and some became involved romantically. We will discuss of the implications of their social and intimate relationships and consider to what extent these networks may have fostered artistic creation as well as political activism. To facilitate these investigations, students will read feminist, queer and geocritical theory to deepen and strengthen our analyses.
1330:TF   DIST
WGSS 302-01 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 234-01 and POSC 234-01.This course will be taught in a mostly synchronous manner during its scheduled times (Mondays/Thursdays, 1:30-2:45 pm). Enrolled students can expect to have a discussion-based course, supplemented by short asynchronous lectures, discussion boards, and writings. During our synchronous class meetings, students can also expect to work at crucial times in small groups and contribute to peer-to-peer activities. Please note that I would be happy to work with students who have concerns about attending class during the appointed meeting times.This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
1330:MR   DIST
WGSS 302-02 History of Race, Gender and American Sports
Instructor: Todd Mealy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 311-01.This remote class will contain both synchronous and asynchronous components. Students should keep Wednesday evening, 6:00-8:00 p.m., available on their weekly schedules for synchronous discussions/activities. This course explores the complexities of race and gender through the study of sports. Through lectures, readings, and class discussion, students will examine the changing role and public response to athlete activism throughout American history. Topics include, but are not limited to, Muscular Christianity in the late nineteenth-century, segregation in amateur and professional athletics during the early twentieth-century, the struggle for integration after World War II, episodes of protest in the 1960s and 1970s, Title IX, and the current fight for racial and gender equality. Each topic will be used to debate the question: Why do societal problems concerning race and gender make it inevitable that American sports culture intersects with local, national, and international politics? To articulate responses to this question, students will use the lens of sports to trace the history of the civil rights, black power, feminist, and LGBTQ+ movements, while observing how concepts of freedom, democracy, and equality are tested through time.
1800:W   DIST
WGSS 305-01 Seminar in Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 435-01.One synchronous meeting each week via Zoom, on Thursdays 10:30-11:45. See course description with Psychology 435 listing. Prerequisites or co-requisite: 200 or PSYC 202 or 211, or permission of the instructor.
1030:R   DIST
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 320-02 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 321-02 and WGSS 301-01.This course will be offered remotely through synchronous sessions on Zoom. Thus, students enrolled in this class must have access to a distraction-free environment as well as computers/laptops/tablets with video AND audio capabilities. This will allow for full participation in class discussions and breakout group sessions. Moreover, these capabilities will afford access to class notes on Whiteboard or through screen sharing, which may be used further for student presentations. Some, but not all, lectures/class sessions will be recorded; therefore, attendance at each session is critical and expected. In addition to Zoom, Moodle will be used to post announcements, the class calendar, grade rubric, written assignments, and links to course reading materials. Office hours will be held remotely, either via Zoom or telephone. Available time slots for these meetings will be posted weekly on the timetosignup link for the class. Individual appointments may be made outside of posted times when necessary. Students with accommodations should schedule a meeting with me anytime prior to the first meeting or during the first week of class. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
1030:TR   DIST
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-01 Disorderly Women
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01.The class will be offered synchronous and I will also hold office hours as such. I will place various instructional/informational videos further explaining writing assignments and other assignments on Moodle. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a disorderly woman and what acts are considered disorderly and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American womens narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyonc. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of disorderly women have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.
1330:MR   DIST
AMST 200-01 History of American Feminism
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 220-01 and HIST 211-03.We will meet on Zoom every Monday from 1:30-2:45. We will meet periodically on Thursdays (dates in syllabus) from 1:30-2:45 on Zoom. This course will emphasize such topics as the 19th century women's movement, the suffrage movement, radical and liberal feminism, and African-American feminism. We will pay particular attention to the diversity of women's experiences in the United States and to women's multiple and often conflicting responses to patriarchy and other forms of oppression.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 219-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-02.Synchronous classes on Zoom Gender roles and sexual identity are central to the transformations that define what it means to be modern in America between the late nineteenth- and mid-twentieth centuries. Artists across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, have engaged the ever-changing boundaries of male and female, straight and gay. They have taken up these boundaries in profound and ordinary ways, both in conscious and unintentional ways. Drawing upon recent scholarship in American art, this course analyzes the shifts in the work of artists from the lesser-known nineteenth-century gender-bending printmaker Ellen Day Hale to the visual culture surrounding the notorious Oscar Wilde and, in the twentieth century, the sexual politics of such famous artist couples as Georgia OKeeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. Prerequisites: 102 or WGSS 100 or AMST 201 or permission of instructor.
1500:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 321-02 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and WGSS 301-01. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
1030:TR   DIST
ENGL 341-01 Sex in the City of Light: Early 20th-Century Women of Paris
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01 and WGSS 301-02. This course in comparative literature and visual culture investigates the city of Paris as a site of sexual and artistic exploration, liberation and confrontation for women of the early 20th-Century. Students will study a variety of literature, visual art, performance art, and haute couture created and produced by women from diverse backgrounds who came to Paris in search of free self-expression. Most of these writers, journalists, artists, dancers, and designers knew each other; many collaborated professionally and mingled socially; and some became involved romantically. We will discuss of the implications of their social and intimate relationships and consider to what extent these networks may have fostered artistic creation as well as political activism. To facilitate these investigations, students will read feminist, queer and geocritical theory to deepen and strengthen our analyses.
1330:TF   DIST
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 364-01 Sex in the City of Light: Early 20th-Century Women in Paris
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-01 and WGSS 301-02. This course in comparative literature and visual culture investigates the city of Paris as a site of sexual and artistic exploration, liberation and confrontation for women of the early 20th-Century. Students will study a variety of literature, visual art, performance art, and haute couture created and produced by women from diverse backgrounds who came to Paris in search of free self-expression. Most of these writers, journalists, artists, dancers, and designers knew each other; many collaborated professionally and mingled socially; and some became involved romantically. We will discuss of the implications of their social and intimate relationships and consider to what extent these networks may have fostered artistic creation as well as political activism. To facilitate these investigations, students will read feminist, queer and geocritical theory to deepen and strengthen our analyses.
1330:TF   DIST
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-03 History of American Feminism
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01 and WGSS 220-01.We will meet on Zoom every Monday from 1:30-2:45. We will meet periodically on Thursdays (dates in syllabus) from 1:30-2:45 on Zoom. This course will emphasize such topics as the 19th century women's movement, the suffrage movement, radical and liberal feminism, and African-American feminism. We will pay particular attention to the diversity of women's experiences in the United States and to women's multiple and often conflicting responses to patriarchy and other forms of oppression.
1330:MR   DIST
HIST 311-01 History of Race, Gender and American Sports
Instructor: Todd Mealy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02.This remote class will contain both synchronous and asynchronous components. Students should keep Wednesday evening, 6:00-8:00 p.m., available on their weekly schedules for synchronous discussions/activities. This course explores the complexities of race and gender through the study of sports. Through lectures, readings, and class discussion, students will examine the changing role and public response to athlete activism throughout American history. Topics include, but are not limited to, Muscular Christianity in the late nineteenth-century, segregation in amateur and professional athletics during the early twentieth-century, the struggle for integration after World War II, episodes of protest in the 1960s and 1970s, Title IX, and the current fight for racial and gender equality. Each topic will be used to debate the question: Why do societal problems concerning race and gender make it inevitable that American sports culture intersects with local, national, and international politics? To articulate responses to this question, students will use the lens of sports to trace the history of the civil rights, black power, feminist, and LGBTQ+ movements, while observing how concepts of freedom, democracy, and equality are tested through time.
1800:W   DIST
Courses Offered in LAWP
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 234-01 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 234-01 and WGSS 302-01.This course will be taught in a mostly synchronous manner during its scheduled times (Mondays/Thursdays, 1:30-2:45 pm). Enrolled students can expect to have a discussion-based course, supplemented by short asynchronous lectures, discussion boards, and writings. During our synchronous class meetings, students can also expect to work at crucial times in small groups and contribute to peer-to-peer activities. Please note that I would be happy to work with students who have concerns about attending class during the appointed meeting times. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis. Prerequisites: One POSC, LAWP or WGSS course or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as POSC 234 and WGSS 302.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 210-01 Philosophy of Feminism
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
I plan to hold synchronous class meetings at the scheduled time (MWF 12:30) at least twice a week with group work scheduled either for the third weekly meeting at that time or in some cases, time shifted for students in a group depending on time zone Critical examination of key issues concerning the status and roles of women and of the developing theories which describe and explain gender-related phenomena and prescribe change for the future. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1230:MWF   DIST
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 234-01 Gender and Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 234-01 and WGSS 302-01.This course will be taught in a mostly synchronous manner during its scheduled times (Mondays/Thursdays, 1:30-2:45 pm). Enrolled students can expect to have a discussion-based course, supplemented by short asynchronous lectures, discussion boards, and writings. During our synchronous class meetings, students can also expect to work at crucial times in small groups and contribute to peer-to-peer activities. Please note that I would be happy to work with students who have concerns about attending class during the appointed meeting times. This course analyzes how legal theorists have drawn upon notions of gender, sex, and sexuality in order to understand and critique the American legal system and its norms. It considers questions like: How might a feminist perspective on the law illuminate instances of systematized inequality or legalized discrimination? Can queer theorists engage with the law in order to alter it, or does the very act of engagement hinder the possibility of future socio-legal change? How can the law better represent women of color, working women, queer women, stay-at-home mothers, transgender or non-binary individuals, women seeking surrogate or abortion services, and more, without reinforcing traditional understandings of what it means to be a woman? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis. Prerequisites: One POSC, LAWP or WGSS course or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 234 and WGSS 302.
1330:MR   DIST
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 135-02 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 135-02.One synchronous meeting each week via Zoom. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 135.
1330:TF   DIST
PSYC 435-01 Seminar in Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01.One synchronous meeting each week via Zoom, on Thursdays 10:30-11:45. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender and sexuality, focusing largely on social psychological and feminist research and theory. This is an advanced seminar that focuses in depth on special topics within these fields. Topics may include sexual identities, gender identities, romantic and sexual relationships, gender and violence, among others. Students will develop their understanding of these topical issues by reading and writing about primary sources and by participating in and leading class discussions. Cross-listed with WGSS 305. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 211 or WGSS 200.
1030:R   DIST
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-01 Contemporary Satire from Latin America
Instructor: Shawn Stein
Course Description:
Synchronous Zoom meetings Mondays; regular synchronous and asynchronous components Thursdays.With a focus on reading, writing, discussing, debating and thinking about the satiric tradition and contemporary cultural production (short stories, films, comics, songs, essays) of satire from different countries in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Uruguay, USA, among others), students will acquire appropriate tools to begin analyzing uses of the satiric mode and its formal elements (for example, irony, hyperbole, parody and the grotesque). We will explore different ways in which historical, social and political topics (democracy, equality, justice, liberty, free speech, censorship, prejudice, stereotypes and taboos) have informed contemporary cultural productions with satiric impulses from different parts of Latin America.
1330:MR   DIST