Fall 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 100-01 Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to central concepts, questions and debates in gender and sexuality studies from US, Women of Color, queer and transnational perspectives. Throughout the semester we will explore the construction and maintenance of norms governing sex, gender, and sexuality, with an emphasis on how opportunity and inequality operate through categories of race, ethnicity, class, ability and nationality. After an introduction to some of the main concepts guiding scholarship in the field of feminist studies (the centrality of difference; social and political constructions of gender and sex; representation; privilege and power; intersectionality; globalization; transnationalism), we will consider how power inequalities attached to interlocking categories of difference shape key feminist areas of inquiry, including questions of: work, resource allocation, sexuality, queerness, reproduction, marriage, gendered violence, militarization, consumerism, resistance and community sustainability.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 208
WGSS 101-01 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-04. This course studies American womens war writing from the US Civil War through the war on terror. We will ask: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, gender identity, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have womens lived experiences and changing social roles impacted the diverse genre of war writingand vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by writers including Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Toni Morrison, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
EASTC 411
WGSS 101-02 Celebrity Culture
Instructor: Todd Nordgren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-07.How long has America been obsessed with celebrity culture? How has our fascination with celebrities shaped our national culture? This course explores the vast range of representations of celebrity culture in 20th and 21st century literature, film, and other media. We will read novels, stories, and plays about the pursuit of fame and watch films about Hollywood and stardom, exploring how the American Dream of self-reliance, financial success, and physical beauty relates to representations of celebrity culture in general. This course will also prompt students to investigate how celebrity is entangled with the shifting politics of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American culture.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 411
WGSS 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 135-01.Students will attend class in person one day a week, and will engage in a variety of asynchronous activities for the other day. See course description with PSYC 135 listing.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 311
WGSS 200-01 Feminist Practices, Writing and Research
Instructor: Katie Schweighofer
Course Description:
Building upon the key concepts and modes of inquire introduced in the WGSS Introductory course, WGSS 200 deepens students understanding of how feminist perspectives on power, experience, and inequality uniquely shape how scholars approach research questions, writing practices, methods and knowledge production. Approaches may include feminist approaches to memoir, oral histories, grassroots and online activism, blogging, visual culture, ethnography, archival research, space, art, literary analysis, and policy studies.Prerequisite: 100, which can be taken concurrently.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
TOME 227
WGSS 201-01 Mexican Women in Drug Trafficking
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-01.Across the world and throughout history, statistics have shown that men commit more crimes than women. However, womens involvement with drug trafficking in Mexico and in Latin America has grown exponentially. The main goal of this course is to analyze Mexican womens diverse and complex participation in drug trafficking while developing writing skills in Spanish. How are women represented? What are women saying and experiencing? Do womens participation in drug trafficking challenges traditional rules and values? Are conventional notions of femininity and masculinity redefined by womens participation in the criminal world? Students will read newspaper clips, testimonials, and interviews, watch a film, and listen to narcocorridos. Taught in Spanish.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
BOSLER 313
WGSS 201-02 Mexican Women in Drug Trafficking
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-03.Across the world and throughout history, statistics have shown that men commit more crimes than women. However, womens involvement with drug trafficking in Mexico and in Latin America has grown exponentially. The main goal of this course is to analyze Mexican womens diverse and complex participation in drug trafficking while developing writing skills in Spanish. How are women represented? What are women saying and experiencing? Do womens participation in drug trafficking challenges traditional rules and values? Are conventional notions of femininity and masculinity redefined by womens participation in the criminal world? Students will read newspaper clips, testimonials, and interviews, watch a film, and listen to narcocorridos. Taught in Spanish.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 313
WGSS 202-02 Sociology of Sexualities
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 228-01.Permission of instructor required.This course explores the social origins of sexual behaviors, identities, and desires. We will investigate how sexuality intersects with other social hierarchies including race, gender, and class. Our current frameworks for understanding sexuality and sexual identity are the product of social, political, and economic forces, and reflect the common sense of a particular historical moment. We will consider a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of sexuality and explore more closely how these perspectives inform the analysis of contemporary sexual issues.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 103
WGSS 300-01 Feminist Perspectives and Theories
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:
This course deepens students understandings of how feminist perspectives situate power and privilege in relationship to interlocking categories of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability and nation. Through foundational theoretical texts, it expands students understandings of significant theoretical frameworks that inform womens, gender, critical race and sexuality studies, as well as debates and tensions within them. Frameworks may include political activisms, materialist feminism, standpoint epistemologies, critiques of scientific objectivity, intersectionality, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, transnational critique and feminist legal theory. Helps students develop more nuanced understandings of the relationship between everyday experiences, political institutions, forms of resistance and theoretical meaning-making. Prerequisite: WGSS 100.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 110
WGSS 301-01 Victorian Sexualities
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 321-01. The Victorian era (18321901), so we are told, fostered rigid attitudes toward morality, gender, and sexuality. Yet an array of dangerous characters inhabit the pages of nineteenth-century literature, among them effeminate men, political women, prostitutes, and hysterics. This course puts Victorian writing about sexuality into conversation with the periods debates about democracy and equality, scrutiny of marriage and property law, and surprising openness to diversity in gender and sexuality. We will concentrate on changing conceptions of the individual, sexuality, and gender, and explore how these conceptions intersect with race, class, nationality, and other identity categories. The syllabus includes a variety of genres (poetry, drama, novel, and non-fiction prose) and authors (including Lord Alfred Tennyson, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Meredith, Charles Dickens, Sigmund Freud, and Michael Field).
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 301
WGSS 301-02 Jane Austen in Her Time
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-01.This course may count as either a pre-1800 300-level literature class, depending on the student's research. Those students who wish to earn pre-1800 credit must inform me before add/drop is over, and I will inform the registrar and supplement and guide research accordingly. Students must satisfactorily complete the final paper as a pre-1800 course to receive pre-1800 credit. Here is a rare opportunity to study the whole of a great writer's oeuvre in a single term. We will read all six of Austen's major novels, biographical material, and selected social history with the aim of understanding the cultural conditions described by the novels, and the novels in their cultural context. Students will lead one class discussion, write one research paper, and present an "accomplishment" befitting Austen's milieu: e. g. performing a musical composition, completing a piece of needlework, learning a card game and teaching it to the class, composing a verbal "charade," and the like. In addition, each week, each student will be expected to write and mail one letter (not e mail) to a correspondent of his/her choosing. (The letters may remain private.)
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 301
WGSS 301-04 Sex in the City of Light: Early 20th-Century Women in Paris
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-04 and FREN 364-01. This course in comparative literature and visual culture investigates the city of Paris as a site of sexual and artistic exploration, liberation, and confrontation for women of the early 20th-Century. Students will study a variety of literature, visual art, performance art, and haute couture created and produced by women from diverse backgrounds who came to Paris in search of free self-expression. Most of these writers, journalists, artists, dancers, and designers knew each other; many collaborated professionally and mingled socially; and some became involved romantically. We will discuss the implications of their professional, social, and intimate relationships and consider to what extent these networks may have fostered artistic creation as well as political activism. To facilitate these investigations, students will read feminist and queer theory to deepen and strengthen our analyses.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 314
WGSS 301-05 Music, Gender, and Performance
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 210-01. This course examines relationships between gender, music, and performance from an interdisciplinary perspective (music and sound studies, ethnomusicology, gender and queer theory, performance studies). We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience drawing on musical examples from a diverse range of genres, traditions, historical moments, and socio-cultural contexts. Some questions we consider include: To what extent is participation in particular musical cultures or scenes dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? What might the voice tell us about gender or sexuality? What might music tell us about the body? What is the relationship between performance and the ways in which social attitudes about masculinity and femininity, homosexuality and heterosexuality are shaped? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially speak for particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure? Class discussions will focus on careful readings of the assigned texts and listening/viewing assignments.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
WEISS 235
WGSS 301-06 Medieval Women Writers
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-05.This course examines the writing of female mystics, abbesses, poets, and scholars from the time period 1100-1500. In a historical time in which women were alternately represented as innocent virgins or devilish temptresses, these women negotiate for themselves far more complex identities and relationships with the world than their societies often believed them capable. We will consider issues of class, gender, sexuality, and religion, through the writings of Heloise, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 411
WGSS 302-01 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 327-01.Exploring the interactions between religious and gender and sexuality, this course examines: how various religious traditions perceive sexuality and gender; the ways in which religion influences social policy both within the United States and globally; and the impact this has on individuals, families, and societies. The course focuses on contemporary concerns, while offering a comparative (historical and cross-cultural) introduction to these issues across several religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to religious fundamentalisms across the three major monotheistic religions: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 204
WGSS 302-02 Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 313-01.Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration Desc: Why do global controversies over immigration so often center on migrant womens fertility and their childrens access to government benefits? Why do some countries accept LGBT migrants but deny them the right to adopt, use assisted reproductive technologies, or extend citizenship to their children? How are efforts to limit marriage-and-family based migration racialized and classed? What are the gendered implications when nurses are a countrys central export? Could building a border wall or sending refugees back stop unwanted immigration? This course examines how intersecting gender, sexual and ethnic hierarchies shape and are shaped by immigration. Applying insights from feminist and queer theories of migration, students will explore how the gendered processes surrounding immigration craft concepts of nation, borders and citizenship. Readings and films examine how sexual and racial norms are renegotiated through the selection and regulation of immigrants. Central to our investigation is how transnational and economic forces compel migration, reshaping understandings of national belonging, workplaces, and family in the process. We will particularly consider how migrants negotiate multiple marginalizations, and in turn refashion understandings of community, identities, culture, and politics. An interdisciplinary framework combines media, sociological, legal, activist, film, literary and historical accounts.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 304
WGSS 305-01 The Psychology of Rape and Sexual Aggression
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 435-01.Permission of instructor required.In this advanced seminar, we will examine psychological theory and research relating to rape and sexual aggression. We will begin by considering the impact of the social construction of masculinity and femininity on sexual relationships. We will then explore the relationship between these gender ideologies and understandings of sexual consent. With this foundation in place, we will examine the psychology of sexual aggression perpetration, victimization, and bystander intervention. Additional topics may include sexual violence in same-sex relationships, sexual violence on college campuses, and rape prevention and education programs.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-04 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01. This course studies American womens war writing from the US Civil War through the war on terror. We will ask: what literary forms have women writers adapted or developed to represent war, as well as the social, political, bodily, and emotional effects of armed conflict? How has womens war writing participated in debates about feminism, gender identity, citizenship, civil and human rights, and the American project? How have womens lived experiences and changing social roles impacted the diverse genre of war writingand vice versa? Primary texts include works of poetry, fiction, and autobiography by writers including Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Elyse Fenton, Frances E.W. Harper, Toni Morrison, Toyo Suyemoto, and Natasha Trethewey.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
EASTC 411
ENGL 101-07 Celebrity Culture
Instructor: Todd Nordgren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-02.How long has America been obsessed with celebrity culture? How has our fascination with celebrities shaped our national culture? This course explores the vast range of representations of celebrity culture in 20th and 21st century literature, film, and other media. We will read novels, stories, and plays about the pursuit of fame and watch films about Hollywood and stardom, exploring how the American Dream of self-reliance, financial success, and physical beauty relates to representations of celebrity culture in general. This course will also prompt students to investigate how celebrity is entangled with the shifting politics of race, class, gender, and sexuality in American culture.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 411
ENGL 321-01 Victorian Sexualities
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-01. The Victorian era (18321901), so we are told, fostered rigid attitudes toward morality, gender, and sexuality. Yet an array of dangerous characters inhabit the pages of nineteenth-century literature, among them effeminate men, political women, prostitutes, and hysterics. This course puts Victorian writing about sexuality into conversation with the periods debates about democracy and equality, scrutiny of marriage and property law, and surprising openness to diversity in gender and sexuality. We will concentrate on changing conceptions of the individual, sexuality, and gender, and explore how these conceptions intersect with race, class, nationality, and other identity categories. The syllabus includes a variety of genres (poetry, drama, novel, and non-fiction prose) and authors (including Lord Alfred Tennyson, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Meredith, Charles Dickens, Sigmund Freud, and Michael Field).
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 301
ENGL 341-01 Jane Austen in Her Time
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-02.This course may count as either a pre-1800 300-level literature class, depending on the student's research. Those students who wish to earn pre-1800 credit must inform me before add/drop is over, and I will inform the registrar and supplement and guide research accordingly. Students must satisfactorily complete the final paper as a pre-1800 course to receive pre-1800 credit.Here is a rare opportunity to study the whole of a great writer's oeuvre in a single term. We will read all six of Austen's major novels, biographical material, and selected social history with the aim of understanding the cultural conditions described by the novels, and the novels in their cultural context. Students will lead one class discussion, write one research paper, and present an "accomplishment" befitting Austen's milieu: e. g. performing a musical composition, completing a piece of needlework, learning a card game and teaching it to the class, composing a verbal "charade," and the like. In addition, each week, each student will be expected to write and mail one letter (not e mail) to a correspondent of his/her choosing. (The letters may remain private.)
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 301
ENGL 341-04 Sex in the City of Light: Early 20th-Century Women of Paris
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 364-01 and WGSS 301-04. This course in comparative literature and visual culture investigates the city of Paris as a site of sexual and artistic exploration, liberation, and confrontation for women of the early 20th-Century. Students will study a variety of literature, visual art, performance art, and haute couture created and produced by women from diverse backgrounds who came to Paris in search of free self-expression. Most of these writers, journalists, artists, dancers, and designers knew each other; many collaborated professionally and mingled socially; and some became involved romantically. We will discuss the implications of their professional, social, and intimate relationships and consider to what extent these networks may have fostered artistic creation as well as political activism. To facilitate these investigations, students will read feminist and queer theory to deepen and strengthen our analyses.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 314
ENGL 341-05 Medieval Women Writers
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-06.This course examines the writing of female mystics, abbesses, poets, and scholars from the time period 1100-1500. In a historical time in which women were alternately represented as innocent virgins or devilish temptresses, these women negotiate for themselves far more complex identities and relationships with the world than their societies often believed them capable. We will consider issues of class, gender, sexuality, and religion, through the writings of Heloise, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
EASTC 411
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 364-01 Sex in the City of Light: Early 20th-Century Women in Paris
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-04 and WGSS 301-04. This course in comparative literature and visual culture investigates the city of Paris as a site of sexual and artistic exploration, liberation, and confrontation for women of the early 20th-Century. Students will study a variety of literature, visual art, performance art, and haute couture created and produced by women from diverse backgrounds who came to Paris in search of free self-expression. Most of these writers, journalists, artists, dancers, and designers knew each other; many collaborated professionally and mingled socially; and some became involved romantically. We will discuss the implications of their professional, social, and intimate relationships and consider to what extent these networks may have fostered artistic creation as well as political activism. To facilitate these investigations, students will read feminist and queer theory to deepen and strengthen our analyses.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 314
Courses Offered in MUAC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUAC 210-01 Music, Gender, and Performance
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-05. This course examines relationships between gender, music, and performance from an interdisciplinary perspective (music and sound studies, ethnomusicology, gender and queer theory, performance studies). We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience drawing on musical examples from a diverse range of genres, traditions, historical moments, and socio-cultural contexts. Some questions we consider include: To what extent is participation in particular musical cultures or scenes dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? What might the voice tell us about gender or sexuality? What might music tell us about the body? What is the relationship between performance and the ways in which social attitudes about masculinity and femininity, homosexuality and heterosexuality are shaped? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially speak for particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure? Class discussions will focus on careful readings of the assigned texts and listening/viewing assignments.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
WEISS 235
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 135-01.Students will attend class in person one day a week, and will engage in a variety of asynchronous activities for the other day. Using a feminist social psychological framework, we will examine theory and research related to the psychology of women and the psychology of gender. We will analyze gender as a system that influences men's and women's lives, and consider the ongoing significance of gender role socialization across the lifespan. Throughout the semester, we will consider the social and political implications of putting women at the center of psychological analysis. In addition, we will develop tools to critically analyze traditional psychological theory and research to expose sexist bias, and we will examine alternative research methodologies that provide ways to study the richness of women's lives in context. This course is cross-listed as WGSS 135.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 311
PSYC 435-01 The Psychology of Rape and Sexual Aggression
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01.Permission of instructor required.In this advanced seminar, we will examine psychological theory and research relating to rape and sexual aggression. We will begin by considering the impact of the social construction of masculinity and femininity on sexual relationships. We will then explore the relationship between these gender ideologies and understandings of sexual consent. With this foundation in place, we will examine the psychology of sexual aggression perpetration, victimization, and bystander intervention. Additional topics may include sexual violence in same-sex relationships, sexual violence on college campuses, and rape prevention and education programs.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 303
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 228-01 Sociology of Sexualities
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-02.Permission of instructor required. This course explores the social origins of sexual behaviors, identities, and desires. We will investigate how sexuality intersects with other social hierarchies including race, gender, and class. Our current frameworks for understanding sexuality and sexual identity are the product of social, political, and economic forces, and reflect the common sense of a particular historical moment. We will consider a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of sexuality and explore more closely how these perspectives inform the analysis of contemporary sexual issues. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 103
SOCI 313-01 Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02.Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration Desc: Why do global controversies over immigration so often center on migrant womens fertility and their childrens access to government benefits? Why do some countries accept LGBT migrants but deny them the right to adopt, use assisted reproductive technologies, or extend citizenship to their children? How are efforts to limit marriage-and-family based migration racialized and classed? What are the gendered implications when nurses are a countrys central export? Could building a border wall or sending refugees back stop unwanted immigration? This course examines how intersecting gender, sexual and ethnic hierarchies shape and are shaped by immigration. Applying insights from feminist and queer theories of migration, students will explore how the gendered processes surrounding immigration craft concepts of nation, borders and citizenship. Readings and films examine how sexual and racial norms are renegotiated through the selection and regulation of immigrants. Central to our investigation is how transnational and economic forces compel migration, reshaping understandings of national belonging, workplaces, and family in the process. We will particularly consider how migrants negotiate multiple marginalizations, and in turn refashion understandings of community, identities, culture, and politics. An interdisciplinary framework combines media, sociological, legal, activist, film, literary and historical accounts.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 304
SOCI 327-01 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-01. Exploring the interactions between religious and gender and sexuality, this course examines: how various religious traditions perceive sexuality and gender; the ways in which religion influences social policy both within the United States and globally; and the impact this has on individuals, families, and societies. The course focuses on contemporary concerns, while offering a comparative (historical and cross-cultural) introduction to these issues across several religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to religious fundamentalisms across the three major monotheistic religions: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Prerequisites: Either 110, 222, 224, 228 or 310, or one course from WGSS or RELG, or permission of the instructor. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 204
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-01 Mexican Women in Drug Trafficking
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01.Across the world and throughout history, statistics have shown that men commit more crimes than women. However, womens involvement with drug trafficking in Mexico and in Latin America has grown exponentially. The main goal of this course is to analyze Mexican womens diverse and complex participation in drug trafficking while developing writing skills in Spanish. How are women represented? What are women saying and experiencing? Do womens participation in drug trafficking challenges traditional rules and values? Are conventional notions of femininity and masculinity redefined by womens participation in the criminal world? Students will read newspaper clips, testimonials, and interviews, watch a film, and listen to narcocorridos.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
BOSLER 313
SPAN 231-03 Mexican Women in Drug Trafficking
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-02.Across the world and throughout history, statistics have shown that men commit more crimes than women. However, womens involvement with drug trafficking in Mexico and in Latin America has grown exponentially. The main goal of this course is to analyze Mexican womens diverse and complex participation in drug trafficking while developing writing skills in Spanish. How are women represented? What are women saying and experiencing? Do womens participation in drug trafficking challenges traditional rules and values? Are conventional notions of femininity and masculinity redefined by womens participation in the criminal world? Students will read newspaper clips, testimonials, and interviews, watch a film, and listen to narcocorridos.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 313