Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 212
SOCI 110-02 Social Analysis
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 212
SOCI 227-01 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Ebru Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 230-01 and WGSS 202-02. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines the nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.For ECON 230: ECON 111 (ECON 112 recommended); For SOCI 227: SOCI 110 or ECON 111; For WGSS 202: none (ECON 111 recommended). This course is cross-listed as ECON 230 & WGSS 202.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
ALTHSE 206
SOCI 230-01 Managing Death and Dying in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor required. This one-course Mosaic focuses on Health Care and End of Life Decision-Making in comparative perspective. We will examine the philosophical, ethical, cultural, policy, organizational, and economic aspects of palliative and hospice care in both the U.S. and the Netherlands. After delving into questions related to the life course, aging, dying, and health care in comparative (historic and cross-cultural perspectives), we will focus on end-of-life care in the U.S. and the Netherlands. How are end-of-life decisions made and what palliative care and hospice options are offered to people/patients in the United States and the Netherlands? What is the substance of the philosophical and ethical debates in each country regarding palliative care and euthanasia? We will hear from medical practitioners, ethicists, policy-makers, and possibly patients as we pursue the following questions: how far should we go in prolonging life? who gets to decide? what may constitute a good death? This Mosaic integrates an 11-day (9 full days in country) to the Netherlands. There will be a program fee.
12:00 PM-02:59 PM, F
STERN 103
SOCI 230-03 Gender, Family and Work in Contemporary China
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03.This course looks in-depth at issues regarding men, women, family, and work in contemporary China. The two main goals of the class are to examine major theoretical debates in the study of gender inequality and to gain empirical knowledge about gender, work, and family in China today. Topics include gender and division of labor in paid and unpaid work, intergenerational relations, marriage and family relations, childbearing and parenting, aging and old-age support, and same-sex partnerships in the rapidly changing context of contemporary China. This course will also examine how gender, family structure, social class affect the ability to achieve work-life balance. Despite the focus being primarily on mainland China, this course will also offer opportunities to broaden the discussions to Greater China (Hong Kong, Taiwan, etc.) and other East Asian societies.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 104
SOCI 230-04 Introduction to Sustainable and Resilient Communities
Instructor: Neil Leary
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with SUST 200-01. What are the goals and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities? What strategies are pursued to make communities more sustainable? More resilient? How are communities responding to and preparing for climate change? What are the intersections between sustainable and resilient communities with inequality, social justice, racism, food security, human health, environmental health, consumerism, economic growth and global climate change? We will explore these and other questions in the context of communities in the United States.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
KAUF 178
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110.
01:30 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 112
SOCI 331-01 Contemporary Sociological Theory
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in contemporary sociological theory (1925-present). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every spring.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 204
SOCI 405-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required. Independent study, in consultation with a specially constituted faculty committee, of a problem area chosen by the student. The student should, in addition to pursuing his/her own interests, also seek to demonstrate how various perspectives within sociology and, where relevant, other disciplines bear on the topic chosen. Permission of the instructor required.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 204
SOCI 500-01 Rural Sociology
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description: