Fall 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 103
SOCI 228-01 Sociology of Sexualities
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-02.Permission of instructor required. This course explores the social origins of sexual behaviors, identities, and desires. We will investigate how sexuality intersects with other social hierarchies including race, gender, and class. Our current frameworks for understanding sexuality and sexual identity are the product of social, political, and economic forces, and reflect the common sense of a particular historical moment. We will consider a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of sexuality and explore more closely how these perspectives inform the analysis of contemporary sexual issues. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 103
SOCI 230-01 Marriage and The Family
Instructor: Ya Su
Course Description:
This course will allow students to learn about the diverse forms the family has taken over time and the social forces that have shaped them. By taking a sociological approach to learning about the family and by gaining knowledge about national family trends and patterns in the U.S., this course will give students the theoretical and empirical tools to understand how family life is linked to social structure; to economic, cultural, and historical events and transitions; and to status characteristics like race, class, and gender.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 304
SOCI 233-01 Asian American Communities
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
This class is designed to move from theoretical understandings of race, and racial identity as it operates in our everyday lives to larger, structural determinants of race with special attention to the unique position of Asian Americans in U.S. race relations. This course focuses on social relations, political identities and activism, immigration and labor experiences to explore the ways Asian Americans have contributed to our larger histories as Americans. Broken down into three sections, this class analyzes the position of Asian Americans in the following interconnected contexts: (a) Asian Americans in relation to dominant society, (b) Asian Americans in relation to other communities of color, and (c) pan-Asian relations. Offered every year.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 104
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 304
SOCI 237-01 Global Inequality
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 103
SOCI 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students will design their own field projects. Prerequisite: 110.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 112
SOCI 313-01 Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02.Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration Desc: Why do global controversies over immigration so often center on migrant womens fertility and their childrens access to government benefits? Why do some countries accept LGBT migrants but deny them the right to adopt, use assisted reproductive technologies, or extend citizenship to their children? How are efforts to limit marriage-and-family based migration racialized and classed? What are the gendered implications when nurses are a countrys central export? Could building a border wall or sending refugees back stop unwanted immigration? This course examines how intersecting gender, sexual and ethnic hierarchies shape and are shaped by immigration. Applying insights from feminist and queer theories of migration, students will explore how the gendered processes surrounding immigration craft concepts of nation, borders and citizenship. Readings and films examine how sexual and racial norms are renegotiated through the selection and regulation of immigrants. Central to our investigation is how transnational and economic forces compel migration, reshaping understandings of national belonging, workplaces, and family in the process. We will particularly consider how migrants negotiate multiple marginalizations, and in turn refashion understandings of community, identities, culture, and politics. An interdisciplinary framework combines media, sociological, legal, activist, film, literary and historical accounts.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 304
SOCI 327-01 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-01. Exploring the interactions between religious and gender and sexuality, this course examines: how various religious traditions perceive sexuality and gender; the ways in which religion influences social policy both within the United States and globally; and the impact this has on individuals, families, and societies. The course focuses on contemporary concerns, while offering a comparative (historical and cross-cultural) introduction to these issues across several religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to religious fundamentalisms across the three major monotheistic religions: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Prerequisites: Either 110, 222, 224, 228 or 310, or one course from WGSS or RELG, or permission of the instructor. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 204
SOCI 330-01 Classical Sociological Theory
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in classical sociological theory (through 1925). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every fall.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 303
SOCI 400-01 Sociology of Gender Violence
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
While dealing with broad conceptualizations of violence, this course will focus on gender and sexual violence in the context of domestic and international disputes. We will examine: the social construction of gender and violence; social policy regarding violence; interpersonal violence: rape in the context of both wartime and peacetime, domestic violence (battering, child abuse, sexual abuse); women's rights as human rights; and the politics of trauma, memory, and denial.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 112