Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor required. Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
0900:TR   DIST
SOCI 224-01 Families and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-02. In this comparative course in family systems, we will study the impact of production and politics on family life in various cultures, including Africa, Latin America, the Far East and the United States. The course uses ethnographic studies and documentaries to illuminate the impact of the political economy on family life, the life course, and gender roles and relationships. Various theories of development will place the ethnographies into socio-political and historical context.
1030:TR   DIST
SOCI 225-01 Race and Ethnicity
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
This course explores the historical and contemporary significance of race and ethnicity in the United States. Students will examine how racial inequality has become a pervasive aspect of U.S. society and why it continues to impact our life chances. We will address race and ethnicity as socio-historical concepts and consider how these social fictions (in collusion with gender, class, and sexuality) produce very real material conditions in everyday life. We will develop a theoretical vocabulary for discussing racial stratification by examining concepts such as prejudice, discrimination, systemic/institutional racism, racial formations, and racial hegemony. We will then look closely at colorblind racism, and examine how this dominant ideology naturalizes social inequality. With this framework in place, students will investigate racial stratification in relation to schools, the labor market, the criminal justice system, neighborhood segregation, immigration, etc. Finally, we will discuss strategies of anti-racism that seek to eliminate enduring racial hierarchies. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   DIST
SOCI 230-01 Faith, Interfaith and Equity: Critical Approaches to Religious Understanding & Justice in N America
Instructor: J Cody Nielsen
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 250-01.This course examines the history of the interfaith movement, beginning with the 1896 Parliament of the Worlds Religions and the 20th centurys reactionary movements toward religious inclusion. This course will examine the ways in which the interfaith movement has and has not changed religious experience in North America. Using a variety of methods, including the study of film and mass media, historical analysis, and experiential learning opportunities, students will gain an understanding of the movement toward religious equity in North America. Students will also critically evaluate systems of religious inequity as contributing to systemic and structural racism and colonialism.
1230:MWF   DIST
SOCI 238-01 Consumer Culture
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
The sociology of consumerism is a major specialty in European sociology, and is only recently receiving attention by American sociologists. In this class, we will examine the increasing importance of consumerism in daily life and the degree to which culture has become commercialized. We will discuss the sign value of commodities, as well as the shift from a stratification system based on the relationship of the means of production to one based on styles and patterns of consumption. We will also concern ourselves with the relationships between consumption and more traditional sociological concerns such as gender, race, and social class.Offered every two years.
0930:MWF   DIST
SOCI 240-02 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students will design their own field projects. Prerequisite: 110 or ANTH 101.
1330:TF   DIST
SOCI 272-01 Islam and the West
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 272-01. This course examines the contemporary relationship between the Islamic world and the Western world. In recent years, many interpretations of this relationship have developed, with some claiming a clash of civilizations is underway. The course critically engages the rapidly growing literature on this topic, while providing an introduction to the sociology of religion, an examination of so-called Western values and their Islamic counterparts, an analysis of key moments in recent history, and finally a survey of minority Muslim communities in the West. This course is cross-listed as MEST 272. Offered every year.
1500:MR   DIST
SOCI 313-01 Sociology of Gender Violence
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
While dealing with broad conceptualizations of violence, this course will focus on gender and sexual violence in the context of domestic and international disputes. We will examine: the social construction of gender and violence; social policy regarding violence; interpersonal violence: rape in the context of both wartime and peacetime, domestic violence (battering, child abuse, sexual abuse); women's rights as human rights; and the politics of trauma, memory, and denial.
1330:R   DIST
SOCI 313-02 Immigration Politics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Contemporary Migration
Instructor: Katie Oliviero
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-02.Prior to Spring Break, class will be held synchronously on Zoom on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Following Spring Break, class will meet synchronously on Tuesdays and Thursdays for on-campus students (one day will be a class session and the other day may include class, small group work, or asynchronous sessions). Remote students will have at least one synchronous session a week on Zoom.Why do global controversies over immigration so often center on migrant womens fertility and their childrens access to government benefits? Why do some countries accept LGBT migrants but deny them the right to adopt, use assisted reproductive technologies, or extend citizenship to their children? How are efforts to limit marriage-and-family based migration racialized and classed? What are the gendered implications when nurses are a countrys central export? Could building a border wall or sending refugees back stop unwanted immigration? This course examines how intersecting gender, sexual and ethnic hierarchies shape and are shaped by immigration. Applying insights from feminist and queer theories of migration, students will explore how the gendered processes surrounding immigration craft concepts of nation, borders and citizenship. Readings and films examine how sexual and racial norms are renegotiated through the selection and regulation of immigrants. Central to our investigation is how transnational and economic forces compel migration, reshaping understandings of national belonging, workplaces, and family in the process. We will particularly consider how migrants negotiate multiple marginalizations, and in turn refashion understandings of community, identities, culture, and politics. An interdisciplinary framework combines media, law, activist, film, literary and historical accounts.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
SOCI 331-01 Contemporary Sociological Theory
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in contemporary sociological theory (1925-present). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every spring.
1130:MWF   DIST
SOCI 400-01 Political/Social Domination and Consent
Instructor: Dan Schubert
Course Description:
If reality is socially constructed, then it can be socially dismantled and reconstructed as well. Why doesnt that happen very often? In this class we will examine ways in which political and social order and control are constructed and maintained in modern societies. Those in positions of power and privilege usually seek to maintain those positions, in part by ensuring the legitimacy of the social system itself. But do those in more subordinate positions also contribute to their own domination in some ways? Our primary focus will be on relations between political domination, consent, and resistance. In what ways and when and where is domination found and what is the role of consent in its maintenance? How is domination established and maintained, on the one hand, and on the other how is it resisted, changed, or overthrown? We will examine these questions by exploring the writings of a range of political/social theorists, including Antonio Gramsci, Frantz Fanon, Hannah Arendt, James Scott, Audre Lorde, and Pierre Bourdieu.
1330:W   DIST
SOCI 405-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Independent study, in consultation with a specially constituted faculty committee, of a problem area chosen by the student. The student should, in addition to pursuing his/her own interests, also seek to demonstrate how various perspectives within sociology and, where relevant, other disciplines bear on the topic chosen. Permission of the instructor required.
1330:W   DIST