Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 230-01 Negotiation and Advocacy
Instructor: Edward Guido
Course Description:
This course will focus on the role of the advocate in the law and policy-making process. It will consider various types of advocacy (public debate, litigation, public relations, etc.) and various methods of negotiation as well as compare and contrast the advocate's role in different forums (legislatures, courts, administrative agencies, the press, etc.). Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 110
LAWP 259-01 Law, Politics, and Society in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 259-01 and POSC 259-01. This course examines the interaction between law, legal institutions and citizens in China, Japan, and India. Covering history and the contemporary scene, course focuses on how law works in practice and is understood and used by ordinary people in Asia. It covers areas such as marriage and divorce, the legal profession, lost property, civil rights, the environment, sexuality, mediation, land development and property, among others. Comparisons between the United States and Asia, as well as between Asian countries, will be emphasized. This course is cross-listed as POSC 259 and LAWP 259. This course is cross-listed as EASN 259 and POSC 259.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
STERN 103
LAWP 260-01 Problem-Solving Courts
Instructor: Albert Masland
Course Description:
Through a hands-on, experiential examination of traditional courts, treatment courts, and addiction issues, this course will introduce the students to the use of problem-solving courts to address drug, DUI, and mental health concerns. A major course component will involve community-based learning. Students will be required to interact with court participants and members of the various problem-solving court teams (e.g., judges, attorneys, probation officers, treatment providers as well as other support specialists, depending on the courts focus). As the students become familiar with one component of the war on drugs, they will be challenged to examine and debate the war as a whole.
04:30 PM-05:45 PM, T
DENNY 317
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, R
DENNY 103
LAWP 290-01 Law and American Society
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-03.Permission of Instructor RequiredNOTE: Students who HAVE taken POSC 220 or 221 need permission of instructor to enroll. This course introduces students to the politics of law. In the first half of the course, students will acquire the historical and theoretical background necessary to think analytically about contemporary controversies in constitutional law. We will consider the relationship between law and violence in a democracy, the drafting of the US Constitution as well as the debates concerning its ratification, the arguments for and against the practice of judicial review, and the theories of constitutional interpretation. In the second half of the semester, students will put this knowledge into practice as we engage with several significant constitutional debates on matters like: equal protection, property ownership, sexual conduct, free speech, the separation of church and state, privacy, reproductive health, affirmative action, capital punishment, gun ownership, voting rights, and campaign finance. By the end of the semester, students will be better able to make sense of legal arguments, especially those rendered by the Supreme Court, and to interpret those arguments in relation to broader trends in American politics and culture.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 313
LAWP 290-02 Capital Punishment
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-04 and PHIL 261-02.Permission of Instructor Required This course examines the historical and contemporary practices of capital punishment in the United States. Indeed, the United States is one of the few constitutional democracies that retains the punishment of death for criminal wrong-doing, despite the efforts made by some Supreme Court Justices to abolish the machinery of death in the American legal system and the pressure placed on federal and state governments by foreign nations to formally abolish its use. This course considers: Why does the state claim the authority to kill its citizens and how does it justify this authority? How has capital punishment in the United States changed over time, such that the modern promise of a painless death endeavors to legitimate its continuation? How do race, gender, class, religion, disability, and location impact who is subjected to the death penalty and for what crimes? What ethical arguments can be made for and against the use of capital punishment as a criminal sentence, from the perspectives of the condemned as well as the victim? Is it even possible to execute an individual in a manner that is just? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 313
LAWP 500-01 Capital Punishment: Effects on Trial Advocacy and Case Outcomes
Instructor: Albert Masland
Course Description:

Courses Offered in PMGT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PMGT 220-01 Biomedical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 220-01. A study of ethical issues arising in the context of medical practice, biomedical research, and health related policy making, with focus on the ethical concepts, theories and reasoning methods developed to clarify and resolve these issues. This course is a Health Studies elective Prerequisite: One previous course in philosophy, or LPPM 200, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 220.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 304