Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
ALTHSE 207
PHIL 102-01 Introduction to Ethics
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to the philosophical study of morality, focusing on concepts of right and wrong, virtue and vice, and wellbeing. This course provides students the opportunity to hone their ethical reasoning skills by critically examining how some of historys most influential philosophers thought about issues in morality. Students will also develop more general skills, such as evaluating philosophical arguments, and expressing and defending their own ideas in writing.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
ALTHSE 08
PHIL 103-01 Logic
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
BOSLER 208
PHIL 104-01 Practical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
This course introduces students to contemporary debates in practical ethics. Course materials investigate how theoretical approaches to ethics apply to practical issues, including discussions of animal ethics, environmental ethics, reproductive ethics, civil disobedience, and the ethics of mass incarceration and the death penalty. This course is best suited for students interested in thinking about the relationship between ethical theory and practice, with an emphasis on how power, privilege, and responsibility intersect in our everyday lives.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 411
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 104
PHIL 202-01 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
This course treats the Rationalists, Empiricists and Kant, with particular emphasis on issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the role of sense perception and reason in knowledge, the nature of substance, God and reality.Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
BOSLER 208
PHIL 220-01 Biomedical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 220-01. A study of ethical issues arising in the context of medical practice, biomedical research, and health related policy making, with focus on the ethical concepts, theories and reasoning methods developed to clarify and resolve these issues. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as PMGT 220.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
EASTC 314
PHIL 252-01 Philosophy of Art
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 252-01. The discipline of aesthetics is primarily concerned with philosophical questions about art and beauty. This course will examine classic and contemporary Western discussions of such questions as, What is art? How can we determine what a work of art means? Are beauty and other aesthetic qualities subjective or objective? How should the quality of a work of art be assessed? Is there a general way to describe the creative process? What are the driving forces in the unfolding of art history? We will encounter such giants of the Western intellectual tradition as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Hegel, and also such contemporary figures as Arthur Danto, Richard Wollheim, and Kendall Walton. Prerequisite: one prior course in art history or philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ARTH 252.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 411
PHIL 253-01 Philosophy of Punishment
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
Explorations of specific figures, texts, and issues in historical and contemporary theory. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
EASTC 301
PHIL 258-01 Philosophy of Data
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
This an introduction to philosophical issues arising in data science. Students will discuss, read and write about some important ethical issues that arise in the practice of data sciences, such as discrimination, privacy, consent, trust, and justice. To help clarify those issues, students will also learn about some connected issues in the epistemology and metaphysics of data science, such as the nature of statistical inference and of algorithms. Prerequisites: DATA/COMP/MATH 180.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 104
PHIL 261-01 Philosophy of Race & Gender
Instructor: Jeff Engelhardt
Course Description:
Is race real? Is gender? This course addresses these and related philosophical questions like, Why do we think in terms of race and gender, and Would a society without race or gender be better off?
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
EASTC 301
PHIL 261-02 Capital Punishment
Instructor: Kathryn Heard
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-04 and LAWP 290-02.Permission of Instructor Required This course examines the historical and contemporary practices of capital punishment in the United States. Indeed, the United States is one of the few constitutional democracies that retains the punishment of death for criminal wrong-doing, despite the efforts made by some Supreme Court Justices to abolish the machinery of death in the American legal system and the pressure placed on federal and state governments by foreign nations to formally abolish its use. This course considers: Why does the state claim the authority to kill its citizens and how does it justify this authority? How has capital punishment in the United States changed over time, such that the modern promise of a painless death endeavors to legitimate its continuation? How do race, gender, class, religion, disability, and location impact who is subjected to the death penalty and for what crimes? What ethical arguments can be made for and against the use of capital punishment as a criminal sentence, from the perspectives of the condemned as well as the victim? Is it even possible to execute an individual in a manner that is just? These questions and more will be taken up as we move through a rich combination of political philosophy, legal cases, and works of socio-legal analysis.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 313
PHIL 261-03 Philosophy of Humor
Instructor: Jim Sias
Course Description:
Examination of specific problem, author, text, or movement. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 314
PHIL 303-01 Epistemology
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
This seminar will probe key issues in epistemology, such as: the nature of knowledge and justification, the challenge of skepticism, the relation of sense perception to conceptual thought. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 104
PHIL 500-01 The Ethics of Public Health
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:

PHIL 500-02 Crime and Punishment: The Ethics of Mass Incarceration
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:

PHIL 500-03 Bioethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:

PHIL 550-01 Moral Blame and Criminal Punishment
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description: