Fall 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEMS 200-01 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 213-01. This course will explore the everyday culture of early modern Europe including careful consideration of how people made sense of their world. It will range from examining religious rituals and objects such as relics to natural magic and the popular science that came with the Scientific Revolution. We will also examine the relationship between commoners and the elites while looking at how ideas spread whether by oral culture, images or the new technology of printing.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
MEMS 200-02 Gothic Pilgrimage
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 213-01. This course considers the visual arts of the late Gothic era in the major European cities, courts, and religious centers as seen through the eyes of a pilgrim c. 1400 en route from Hereford to Rome (along the via Francigena), Rome to Jerusalem, and back to Hereford (along the banking trade routes via Cologne). The sites selected trace well-known routes that pilgrims followed to the Holy Land and the objects and monuments they encountered: e.g. the city itself, principal sacred and civic structures, altarpieces, reliquaries, and tombs of saints and rulers. Readings and discussions will examine medieval notions of pilgrimage and its role in late medieval society, with a focus on the rituals and objects associated with death, burial, afterlife, and commemoration. Each object will be considered within the broader fabric of its surroundings, paying particular attention to the rituals and physical context associated with the object and how it would have been experienced by a pilgrim.
1500:MR   WEISS 219
MEMS 200-03 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 259-01, RELG 259-01 and MEST 259-01.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 101-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
This course is a critical survey of western art beginning with the Ancient Near East (approximately 4000 B.C.) through the Gothic period in Europe (early 1300s). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of style, subject-matter, and function within an historical context, and especially on the student's ability to develop skills in visual analysis. Developing appropriate vocabularies with which to discuss and analyze works of art and imagery will also be stressed, along with learning to evaluate scholarly interpretations of them.
1030:MWF   WEISS 235
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 213-01 Gothic Pilgrimage
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-02. This course considers the visual arts of the late Gothic era in the major European cities, courts, and religious centers as seen through the eyes of a pilgrim c. 1400 en route from Hereford to Rome (along the via Francigena), Rome to Jerusalem, and back to Hereford (along the banking trade routes via Cologne). The sites selected trace well-known routes that pilgrims followed to the Holy Land and the objects and monuments they encountered: e.g. the city itself, principal sacred and civic structures, altarpieces, reliquaries, and tombs of saints and rulers. Readings and discussions will examine medieval notions of pilgrimage and its role in late medieval society, with a focus on the rituals and objects associated with death, burial, afterlife, and commemoration. Each object will be considered within the broader fabric of its surroundings, paying particular attention to the rituals and physical context associated with the object and how it would have been experienced by a pilgrim.
1500:MR   WEISS 219
Courses Offered in CLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CLST 100-01 Greek and Roman Mythology
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
An introduction to the study and interpretation of Greek and Roman myths, as they appear both in ancient sources and in later music, sculpture, painting, and literature. The course focuses on interpretive approaches that can help us to define the insights of these myths into to human psychology and the predicaments of men and women, and to apply those insights critically to our own time.
1330:MR   EASTC 411
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Medievalism from J.R.R. Tolkien to Game of Thrones
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
The novels of J.R.R. Tolkien popularized a new era of medievalism in the arts, inspiring an incredible output of novels, art, movies and television, and video and role-playing games. Yet medievalism is also often hurled as an insult, indicating outmoded or backwards-looking modes of thought. In this class, we will consider the ramifications of the resurgence of medievalism in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including questions of genre, politics, history, and the individual in society. Authors include J.R.R. Tolkien, Ursula Le Guin, and G.R.R. Martin.
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
ENGL 101-02 Doomsday Books: Apocalypse and Revolution in English Literature
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Global warming is changing our world, quickly and violently. In this class we will explore how a millennium of English authors responded to prior moments of traumatic change. We will look at invasions, plagues, religious struggles, wars, and economic and environmental transformations. Authors may include the poets of Beowulf and the mystery plays, Langland, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Defoe, Goldsmith, Blake, Shelley, Scott, and Marx. We will learn from how others have faced catastrophe.
1500:TF   EASTC 411
ENGL 331-02 Angels and Demons on the Early English Stage
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
From the soaring orations of God and the admonitions of angels to the blasphemies and deceptions of devils, the denizens of heaven and hell occupied considerable time and space on the medieval and early modern stage. In the mouths of supernatural beings, playwrights could ask challenging questions about subjects such as religion, government, free will, gendered relationships, personal identity, and the nature of literature. This class will explore these issues through the lens of early English drama, from amateur medieval guilds to the rise of professional public theaters, and will conclude with the study of these early works in performance today. Texts will include medieval cycle and morality plays, Marlowes Doctor Faustus, Shakespeares Othello, and Ben Jonsons The Devil is an Ass.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
ENGL 341-01 Four Early Modern Poets: Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Three of the most admired poets in the English language, Shakespeare, Donne, and Herbert, have been often read, memorized, and mimicked since their publication in the seventeenth century. Mary Wroth, however, remained largely unpublished until the twentieth century and only recently has she been admired and studied. Poetry, and to a great extent literacy, were male-dominated in the seventeenth century, when only women of wealthy families had the chance to learn to read and write. We will examine the cultural context in which these poets wrote and ask to what extent art and our reception of art are governed by cultural forces such as gender, religious controversy, wealth, sexual practice, and biographical circumstance. We will ask: How can we discern whether arguments based upon culture and biography are legitimate? If great art is driven by cultural concerns, then how do we know where these outside issues enter into the texts? Our goal throughout our investigation of the art/culture debate will be to learn techniques of describing and analyzing poems as works of art.
0900:TR   EASTC 301
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 365-01 Perceiving the Natural World in the French Enlightenment
Instructor: Hanna Roman
Course Description:
Scientists today often attribute the beginning of the era of radical climate change, termed the 'Anthropocene', to changes in culture, economy, and technology in eighteenth-century Europe. What were the intellectual and philosophical ideas behind these changes, and how did they contribute to modern-day conceptions of the natural environment and humankind's role within it? This seminar will address these questions through the lens of the literature of Enlightenment France and its power to invent and imagine new ways of perceiving and altering nature. It will engage with the Enlightenment movement as both a time of reason and progress as well as prejudice and destruction. We will reflect upon which aspects of eighteenth-century natural thought are still relevant and useful today and which have become harmful to the future of our planet. Readings include works of fiction, philosophy, natural history, and science fiction by famous Enlightenment authors such as Diderot, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as by less well-known, but equally important, voices such as Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Mme de Graffigny, and the comte de Grainville.
1330:W   BOSLER 309
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 101-01 The Age of Faith: Medieval Europe between Church and State
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 260-02. This survey course will study the development of European civilization during the period ca.500 to 1500 with special attention to the rise of the papacy and religious conflict. It will consider the impact of such events as the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic invasions, the development of Christianity and the Church, the emergence of feudalism, the expansion of Islam and the Crusades, and the creation of romantic literature. This survey course will study the development of European civilization during the period ca.300 to 1300. It will consider the impact of such events as the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic invasions, the development of Christianity and the Church, the emergence of feudalism, the expansion of Islam and the Crusades, and the creation of romantic literature.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
HIST 121-01 Middle East to 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 121-01. The rise of Islam, the development of Islamic civilization in medieval times and its decline relative to Europe in the early modern era, 1500-1750. This course is cross-listed as MEST 121.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
HIST 213-01 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-01. This course will explore the everyday culture of early modern Europe including careful consideration of how people made sense of their world. It will range from examining religious rituals and objects such as relics to natural magic and the popular science that came with the Scientific Revolution. We will also examine the relationship between commoners and the elites while looking at how ideas spread whether by oral culture, images or the new technology of printing.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
HIST 253-01 Autocracy, Uprisings, and Daily Life in Medieval and Imperial Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 253-01. An examination of the early formation of multi-ethnic clans into a large multinational empire. The course explores state formation, the role of women, church power, the arts, nationality conflict and figures such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great.
1130:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 259-01, RELG 259-01 and MEMS 200-03. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as MEST 259 and RELG 259.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
Courses Offered in ITAL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ITAL 341-01 The Discourse of Love
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
What is Love? Through a diverse selection of works from authors such as St. Francis, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Lorenzo de' Medici, Pietro Aretino, Gaspara Stampa, and Veronica Franco, students will examine the nature of love from a variety of perspectives. From the spirituality of religion to the physicality of desire and attraction, this course will confront topics such as the medieval and Renaissance ideas of love (courtly love, the Dolce Stil Novo, and love sickness), theological notions of love (charity), different expressions of love (heterosexuality, same-sex attraction and polyamory), and transgressive types of love (lust, adultery, and prostitution). This course is taught in Italian. Prerequisites: 231 and 232, or permission of the instructor. Offered every year.
1500:MR   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 121-01 Middle East to 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 121-01. The rise of Islam, the development of Islamic civilization in medieval times and its decline relative to Europe in the early modern era, 1500-1750.This course is cross-listed as HIST 121.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
MEST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 259-01, RELG 259-01 and MEMS 200-03.. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as HIST 372 and RELG 259.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
Courses Offered in MUAC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUAC 101-01 History of Music
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
An introductory course for students with some previous music experience providing training in intelligent listening through chronological discussion and analysis of selected representative works from the Middle Ages to 1750.
1330:MR   WEISS 235
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 259-01, MEST 259-01 and MEMS 200-03. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as HIST 259 and MEST 259.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
RELG 260-02 The Age of Faith: Medieval Europe between Church and State
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 101-01. This survey course will study the development of European civilization during the period ca.500 to 1500 with special attention to the rise of the papacy and religious conflict. It will consider the impact of such events as the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic invasions, the development of Christianity and the Church, the emergence of feudalism, the expansion of Islam and the Crusades, and the creation of romantic literature. This survey course will study the development of European civilization during the period ca.300 to 1300. It will consider the impact of such events as the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic invasions, the development of Christianity and the Church, the emergence of feudalism, the expansion of Islam and the Crusades, and the creation of romantic literature.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in RUSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RUSS 253-01 Autocracy, Uprisings, and Daily Life in Medieval and Imperial Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 253-01.Taught in English. An examination of the early formation of multi-ethnic clans into a large multinational empire. The course explores state formation, the role of women, church power, the arts, nationality conflict and figures such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great.
1130:MWF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 320-01 Studies in Spanish Golden Age Texts
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
This course will present the diversity of Spanish literature during its moment of greatest achievement. The evolution of various genres will be studied, and various works by writers such as Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Caldern, Gngora, Quevedo and others will be read. The purpose is to acquaint the students with works that have had a significant impact on Spanish culture and literature. Prerequisite: 305.
1330:MR   BOSLER 313