Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEMS 200-01 Michelangelo-Man & Myth
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 212-01. In this course, we will explore the figure and art of Michelangelo from a historiographic and critical perspective. Understanding his role as an artist and the effect of his art on his contemporaries and subsequent generations of artists, critics, and scholars through our own era will be a primary goal. Readings will be drawn from a variety of primary and secondary sources, and will include writings by Michelangelo himself, critical and theoretical commentaries, historical narratives, and art-historical interpretations. Conflicts within the scholarly community about how we might understand and reconstruct his life will also be addressed, as well as how the idea of the creative process was constructed and enacted during the Renaissance in Italy.Prerequisite: 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.
1330:W   WEISS 219
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 212-01 Michelangelo-Man & Myth
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-01. In this course, we will explore the figure and art of Michelangelo from a historiographic and critical perspective. Understanding his role as an artist and the effect of his art on his contemporaries and subsequent generations of artists, critics, and scholars through our own era will be a primary goal. Readings will be drawn from a variety of primary and secondary sources, and will include writings by Michelangelo himself, critical and theoretical commentaries, historical narratives, and art-historical interpretations. Conflicts within the scholarly community about how we might understand and reconstruct his life will also be addressed, as well as how the idea of the creative process was constructed and enacted during the Renaissance in Italy.Prerequisite: 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.
1330:W   WEISS 219
ARTH 301-01 Italian Renaissance Art 1450-1563
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1450 through 1580. The works of Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Bramente, and Titian, among others, will be addressed. Issues of style, patronage, and function will be considered within the political and cultural contexts of the 15th and the 16th centuries. Critical and theoretical writings of the period will also be discussed. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 The Legend of King Arthur: From Medieval to Monty Python
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
The legend of King Arthur has captured imaginations for hundreds of years, inspiring adaptations even into the present day. Yet when the legend originated a millennium ago, it was already considered a tale of a bygone age, the dream of a romantic past. This class will study the medieval origins of the King Arthur story and then trace that legend through time to the present day, including the films King Arthur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. As we read, we will consider how each text responds to both its historical context and its own imagined past.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
ENGL 311-01 Chaucer's Women
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-03. Patient Griselda, sensual Alisoun, long-suffering Constance, the irrepressible Wife of Bath - in The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer provides a wide range of women who alternately uphold and challenge the medieval boundaries of femininity. In this class we will explore medieval conceptions of gender, sexuality, and authority by way of Chaucer's most memorable women, read alongside confessional manuals, scientific treatises, and religious tracts that provide insight into how medieval scholars conceptualized the differences between men and women.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
ENGL 341-01 Early Modern Lyric
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England generally are recognized as the Golden Age of the lyricthe shortpoem. We will begin our reading of the sixteenth-century poem with adaptations of Petrarchan sonnets by Wyatt and Surrey, and move to the mastery of the form by Sidney and Spencer. The seventeenth century begins with the revival of the sonnet by Shakespeare, and includes brilliant passionate poems declaiming the love of God and the love of women and men by Herbert, Donne, Wroth, Marvell, and others. In addition to learning the techniques of describing and analyzing these poems aesthetically, we will also discuss the cultural contexts in which our poets lived. Our objective will be to interrogate T.S. Eliots assertion, early in the twentieth century, that a lyric poem is the voice of the poet speaking to himself or nobody. As we read and discuss we will ask ourselves, both consciously and unconsciously, how private or how porous brief poems might be. Can artists write in a vacuum, as Eliot implies, alienated from political and financial directives, keeping their work pure and unsullied? Instead, if great art is to some extent driven by cultural concerns, such as religious controversy, struggles to define and defend the monarchy, and incipient women's rights, then how do we know where these outside issues enter into the art?
1330:TF   DENNY 103
ENGL 341-02 English Literature: 1660-1776: Plagues, Petticoats, Poems & Plays
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Canonical authors and marginal voices of the long eighteenth century. Plagues, fires, invasions, fashion, theology, flirtation, lexicography, heavy drinking, slavery, rebellion, municipal sanitation, love. Pepys, Dryden, Behn, Addison, Pope, Swift, Pilkington, Johnson, Boswell, Piozzi, possibly early Austen.
0900:TR   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 106-01 Early Modern Europe to 1799
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Society, culture, and politics from the Renaissance through the French Revolution.
0930:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 215-04 From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims From Their Origins to the Present
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-03 and RELG 260-02. This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
1330:TF   STERN 11
HIST 223-01 Renaissance Europe
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
A study of prevailing conditions (social, economic, political, and cultural) in western Europe with particular attention given to the achievements and failures of the Renaissance. Offered every other year.
1030:TR   DENNY 21
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 216-01 Kabbalah: Healing the Soul, Repairing the Cosmos
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 260-01. Tracing the history of Jewish mysticism, the course introduces major trends in Jewish mysticism, focusing special attention on Kabbalistic meditation and its practice, food and sustainability, interpretation of dreams and white magic, spiritual music, death and reincarnation, feminism and gender issues. We will also explore Hasidic tales that have been attributed the power to reveal and to heal, alongside contemporary expressions of Kabbalistic topics in literature and in movies. The course includes guest lectures and other activities and special events.
0900:TR   ASBELL SEM
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 200-03 From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims From Their Origins to the Present
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 260-02 and HIST 215-04. This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
1330:TF   STERN 11
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 260-01 Kabbalah: Healing the Soul, Repairing the Cosmos
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 216-01. Tracing the history of Jewish mysticism, the course introduces major trends in Jewish mysticism, focusing special attention on Kabbalistic meditation and its practice, food and sustainability, interpretation of dreams and white magic, spiritual music, death and reincarnation, feminism and gender issues. We will also explore Hasidic tales that have been attributed the power to reveal and to heal, alongside contemporary expressions of Kabbalistic topics in literature and in movies. The course includes guest lectures and other activities and special events.
0900:TR   ASBELL SEM
RELG 260-02 From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims From Their Origins to the Present
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-03 and HIST 215-04. This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
1330:TF   STERN 11
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 301-03 Chaucer's Women
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 311-01. Patient Griselda, sensual Alisoun, long-suffering Constance, the irrepressible Wife of Bath - in The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer provides a wide range of women who alternately uphold and challenge the medieval boundaries of femininity. In this class we will explore medieval conceptions of gender, sexuality, and authority by way of Chaucer's most memorable women, read alongside confessional manuals, scientific treatises, and religious tracts that provide insight into how medieval scholars conceptualized the differences between men and women.
1030:TR   DENNY 103