Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEMS 490-01 The Senior Experience
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Senior Projects and Research in Medieval & Early Modern Studies. Seniors in the major will work independently with a director and a second faculty reader (representing another discipline in the major) to produce a lengthy paper or special project which focuses on an issue relevant to the cluster of courses taken previously. Under the direction of the program coordinator, students will meet collectively 2 or 3 times during the semester with the directors (and, if possible, other MEMS faculty) to share bibliographies, research data, early drafts, and the like. This group will also meet at the end of the semester to discuss and evaluate final papers and projects.Prerequisite. 200; four-course "cluster."
 
MEMS 490-02 The Senior Experience
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
Senior Projects and Research in Medieval & Early Modern Studies. Seniors in the major will work independently with a director and a second faculty reader (representing another discipline in the major) to produce a lengthy paper or special project which focuses on an issue relevant to the cluster of courses taken previously. Under the direction of the program coordinator, students will meet collectively 2 or 3 times during the semester with the directors (and, if possible, other MEMS faculty) to share bibliographies, research data, early drafts, and the like. This group will also meet at the end of the semester to discuss and evaluate final papers and projects.Prerequisite. 200; four-course "cluster."
 
MEMS 490-03 The Senior Experience
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Senior Projects and Research in Medieval & Early Modern Studies. Seniors in the major will work independently with a director and a second faculty reader (representing another discipline in the major) to produce a lengthy paper or special project which focuses on an issue relevant to the cluster of courses taken previously. Under the direction of the program coordinator, students will meet collectively 2 or 3 times during the semester with the directors (and, if possible, other MEMS faculty) to share bibliographies, research data, early drafts, and the like. This group will also meet at the end of the semester to discuss and evaluate final papers and projects.Prerequisite. 200; four-course "cluster."
 
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 216-01 Goddesses, Prostitutes, Wives, Saints, and Rulers: Women and European Art 1200-1680
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01. How has the representation of women been constructed, idealized, vilified, manipulated, sexualized, and gendered during what could be broadly called the Renaissance in Europe? How have female artists, such as Sofanisba Anguissola (1532-1625) or Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653), among others, represented themselves, men, and other familiar subjects differently from their male counterparts? How have female rulers, like Queen Elizabeth I of England, controlled their own political and cultural self-fashioning through portraiture? What role do the lives and writings of female mystics, like Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) or Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) play in depictions of their physical and spiritual identity? How was beauty and sexuality conceived through the imagery of mythological women, like Venus, or culturally ambivalent women, like courtesans and prostitutes? What kind of art did wealthy, aristocratic women or nuns pay for and use? Through studying primary texts, scholarly literature, and relevant theoretical sources, we will address these and other issues in art produced in Italy, France, Spain, Northern Europe, and England from 1200-1680. The course will be grounded in an understanding of historical and cultural contexts, and students will develop paper topics based on their own interests in consultation with the professor. A screening of the documentary film, A Woman Like That (2009), on the life of Artemisia Gentileschi and a trip to the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. will take place during the second half of the semester. Offered every year.
1330:TF   WEISS 221
ARTH 300-01 Artists, Audience, Patrons: Art & Architecture of the Italian Renaissance
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
This course examines painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1250 to 1570. The work of Giotto, Lorenzetti, Donatello, Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, and Michelangelo, among others will be addressed. Students will study the significance of style, subject-matter, function, patronage, and artistic practice within historical and cultural contexts, and will also address Renaissance interpretations and responses to works of art. Discussion of art-historical theory and criticism as well as Renaissance theory and criticism based in primary texts will be an intrinsic part of the course. Students will acquire the ability to analyze and interpret works of art from the period within the framework outlined above, and will gain a working knowledge of the most significant works and the meaning(s) they have acquired over time. Analysis of primary and secondary sources will be a central focus of the research project, and students will be expected to construct a clear and well-supported interpretive argument over the course of the semester. The course includes a field trip to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., which has the largest collection of Italian Renaissance painting outside of Europe. Prerequisite: 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered every year. This course examines painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1250 to 1570. The work of Giotto, Lorenzetti, Donatello, Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, and Michelangelo, among others will be addressed. Students will study the significance of style, subject-matter, function, patronage, and artistic practice within historical and cultural contexts, and will also address Renaissance interpretations and responses to works of art. Discussion of art-historical theory and criticism as well as Renaissance theory and criticism based in primary texts will be an intrinsic part of the course. Students will acquire the ability to analyze and interpret works of art from the period within the framework outlined above, and will gain a working knowledge of the most significant works and the meaning(s) they have acquired over time. Analysis of primary and secondary sources will be a central focus of the research project, and students will be expected to construct a clear and well-supported interpretive argument over the course of the semester. The course includes a field trip to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., which has the largest collection of Italian Renaissance painting outside of Europe. Prerequisite: 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered every year.
0900:TR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 331-01 Where Do Novels Come From
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Unlike age-old genres such as the lyric, epic, or drama, the novel describes itself as something, well, novel. In this course we will focus on what is new about the novel by reading founding texts of the British novel tradition, with some attention to earlier sources and Continental analogues. Authors will likely include Haywood, Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Equiano, Austen, and Goethe.
1330:TF   BOSLER 314
ENGL 341-02 Shakespeare: Politics/Culture
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
We will read seven plays representing Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories: Much Ado About Nothing, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Measure for Measure, MacBeth, Lear, and The Tempest. We will also view and discuss films of several of these plays by such directors as Branaugh, Casson, Greenaway, Kurosawa, and Noble. The secondary - theoretical - reading for the course will primarily draw upon New Historicist and Cultural Materialist criticism, first practiced in the US by Stephen Greenblatt in his Renaissance Self-Fashioning (1980). Where appropriate, we will also consider contextual and feminist issues. Assignments will include an in-class performance of a scene from one of the plays, a mid-term, a brief close reading essay, and a final research paper.
0900:TR   EASTC 314
ENGL 341-03 Entanglements in the Colonial Americas
Instructor: Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-02.NOTE: Taught in English. This course will encourage students to rethink the traditional nation-centric narratives of British and Spanish American history, according to which the histories and literatures of the two regions developed separately and rarely overlapped. Instead, we will learn just how entangled these histories really were. Students will read both historical and literary texts as we explore how peoples of the Early Americas navigated fluid environments in which multilingual and multicultural experiences were not unusual and helped constitute complex intersectional personal and regional identities. This course ultimately asks students to consider what it meant to be American in such dynamic zones of exchange. The course will be taught in English. Readings will be in both English and Spanish; English translations of Spanish texts will be provided for students enrolling in English 341, who will submit written work in English. Students registering for Spanish 380 are expected to read the Spanish originals and required to submit written work in Spanish.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-01 Age of Atlantic Exploration
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course will examine the various contacts and interactions that shaped the culture of the Atlantic World between roughly the 1450s and 1620s. We will look at the variety of people and cultures that engaged with one another on the rim of the Atlantic Ocean: Spanish, Portuguese, Swede, Dutch, French, English, African, and the native peoples throughout the New World. We will not focus solely on North America, but will instead take a wider perspective that includes the development of the four continents that share the ocean. In doing so, we'll interrogate the idea of exploration and what it meant throughout this period; the differences between colonial projects and their reception; and the roles that all of these cultures played in creating an Atlantic World of incredible complexity, nuance, tension, and accommodation.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
HIST 215-06 History of Christianity: From Margin to Center
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 212-01.[Pending approval] There is an OPTIONAL globally integrated portion of this course which will take place at the end of the semester (tentatively May 18-28, 2020) in Italy. The trip strongly emphasizes experiential place-based learning, and students will complete all site visits detailed in the program, which will take place primarily in Rome, with day-trip to Pompeii. Application through CGSE due in the Spring semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 202-01 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
This course treats the Rationalists, Empiricists and Kant, with particular emphasis on issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the role of sense perception and reason in knowledge, the nature of substance, God and reality.Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   EASTC 301
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 212-01 History of Christianity: From Margin to Center
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-06.[Pending approval] There is an OPTIONAL globally integrated portion of this course which will take place at the end of the semester (tentatively May 18-28, 2020) in Italy. The trip strongly emphasizes experiential place-based learning, and students will complete all site visits detailed in the program, which will take place primarily in Rome, with day-trip to Pompeii. Application through CGSE due in the Spring semester. The course traces the emergence of Christianity from its beginnings as a minority sect in the first century to the height of its influence in the 14th century. Special attention will be given to cultural and aesthetic influences on the emerging Church.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 380-02 Entanglements in the Colonial Americas
Instructor: Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 341-03.NOTE: Taught in English. This course will encourage students to rethink the traditional nation-centric narratives of British and Spanish American history, according to which the histories and literatures of the two regions developed separately and rarely overlapped. Instead, we will learn just how entangled these histories really were. Students will read both historical and literary texts as we explore how peoples of the Early Americas navigated fluid environments in which multilingual and multicultural experiences were not unusual and helped constitute complex intersectional personal and regional identities. This course ultimately asks students to consider what it meant to be American in such dynamic zones of exchange. The course will be taught in English. Readings will be in both English and Spanish; English translations of Spanish texts will be provided for students enrolling in English 341, who will submit written work in English. Students registering for Spanish 380 are expected to read the Spanish originals and required to submit written work in Spanish.
1500:MR   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 201-01 Goddesses, Prostitutes, Wives, Saints, and Rulers: Women and European Art 1200-1680
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 216-01. How has the representation of women been constructed, idealized, vilified, manipulated, sexualized, and gendered during what could be broadly called the "Renaissance" in Europe? How have female artists, such as Sofanisba Anguissola (1532-1625) or Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653), among others, represented themselves, men, and other familiar subjects differently from their male counterparts? How have female rulers, like Queen Elizabeth I of England, controlled their own political and cultural self-fashioning through portraiture? What role do the lives and writings of female mystics, like Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) or Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) play in depictions of their physical and spiritual identity? How was beauty and sexuality conceived through the imagery of mythological women, like Venus, or culturally ambivalent women, like courtesans and prostitutes? What kind of art did wealthy, aristocratic women or nuns pay for and use? Through studying primary texts, scholarly literature, and relevant theoretical sources, we will address these and other issues in art produced in Italy, France, Spain, Northern Europe, and England from 1200-1680. The course will be grounded in an understanding of historical and cultural contexts, and students will develop paper topics based on their own interests in consultation with the professor. A screening of the documentary film, "A Woman Like That" (2009), on the life of Artemisia Gentileschi and a trip to the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. will take place during the second half of the semester.
1330:TF   WEISS 221