Spring 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0930:MWF   EASTC 411
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Class will be held synchronously on Zoom on Tuesdays. This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0900:R   HUB SOC HALL E
0900:T   DIST
HIST 120-01 History of East Asia from Ancient Times to the Present
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 120-01.This remote class will contain both synchronous and asynchronous components. Students should keep Wed and Fri 9:30 - 10:20 available on their weekly schedules for synchronous discussions and activities. This course explores the diverse and interrelated histories of the region currently composed of China, Korea, and Japan, over the past two thousand years. We begin by studying the technologies and systems of thought that came to be shared across East Asia, including written languages, philosophies of rule, and religions. Next, we examine periods of major upheaval and change, such as the rise of warrior governments, the Mongol conquests, and engagement with the West. The course concludes by tracing the rise and fall of the Japanese empire and the development of the modern nation states that we see today.This course is cross-listed as EASN 120.
0930:WF   DIST
HIST 122-01 Middle East since 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 122-01.This remote course will meet synchronously at the times indicated. Bureaucratic-military reforms of the 19th century in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire, European imperialism, regional nationalisms, contemporary autocratic regimes, and the politicization of religion. This course is cross-listed as MEST 122.
1030:MWF   DIST
HIST 131-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01.This class will combine weekly asynchronous activities with synchronous meetings. Most synchronous meetings will take place on Thursdays during scheduled class time. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
1500:TR   DIST
HIST 151-01 History of Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This course will consist of a weekly asynchronous lecture, which students should try to do on Sunday or Monday, and two weekly discussion sections on Wednesday and Friday. Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
1030:WF   DIST
HIST 171-01 African History since 1800
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 171-01.This course will meet synchronously MWF 9:30 - 10:20. In this course we will study the political, social, economic and ecological forces that have shaped African societies since 1800. We will examine in depth the Asante kingdom in West Africa, the Kongo kingdom in Central Africa, and the Zulu kingdom in Southern Africa. European's colonization of Africa and Africans' responses will be a major focus of the course.This course is cross-listed as AFST 171.
0930:MWF   DIST
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description:
This remote class will contain both synchronous and asynchronous components. Students should keep the listed class times (Tue and Thu 10:30-11:45am) available on their weekly schedules for synchronous discussions and activities. Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1030:TR   DIST
HIST 211-01 The Civil Rights Movement: North and South
Instructor: Say Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04.This remote course will be taught synchronously on the days and times indicated. The post-World War II movement for African Americans civil rights is often considered solely in terms of Southern-based groups and events. This class will explode the myth that the civil rights movement was confined to the South by exploring the national character of inequalities, segregation and the movement for Black freedom. With special attention to the years 1945-1975, this class will consider how segregation formed differently in Birmingham versus Alabama, how the fight for school de-segregation included battles in both Little Rock and New York, and how gender shaped protest politics and tactics of the movement across the nation. Key topics will include Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and ideas of leadership; key campaigns in Birmingham, New York, Detroit and elsewhere; important groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and how ideas about masculinity and femininity shaped the movement. An important thread throughout the class will be understanding how racial inequalities came to be baked into the structures and systems that shape life in the United States from housing to education to employment. Well learn about structural racism through the prism of Black resistance to it.
1330:MR   DIST
HIST 211-02 US Military History
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Class will be held synchronously on Zoom on Tuesdays.This historical topics course will survey major themes in US military history, including an assessment of the evolving American way of war, major homefront challenges, and key episodes in civil-military relations within the constitutional framework.
1030:T   DIST
1030:R   HUB SOC HALL E
HIST 211-03 The Civil Rights Movement: North and South
Instructor: Say Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06.
1500:MR   DIST
HIST 215-01 Refugees
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
With refugees in the news the last few years, we hear repeated stories of difficult trajectories, international organizations that are unprepared, and countries that are unwelcoming. We also see the media's short attention span. Yet, none of these issues is new. This course will explore modern refugeedom. Refugees, as distinct from migrants, typically flee from war, civil war, and genocide and ethnic cleansing. Some scholars are now beginning to categorize migration from the effects of climate change as refugees, too. We will start at the beginning of the last century as modern warfare and new forms of nationalism forced millions to search for safety in what one scholar has called a "whole empire walking." Our course will investigate causes for flight, the responses from national governments and international organizations, and the daily life of the refugees in Europe, Africa, south and east Asia and in their new places of residence. Throughout, we will reflect on modern day crises so that we as global citizens can engage with refugee populations who live in our communities and learn from several historical case studies (e.g. Vietnam and Bosnia) how better to accommodate populations fleeing violence and resettling in different cultures where many citizens may not be welcoming.
1230:MWF   DENNY 204
HIST 217-01 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02.This remote class will contain both synchronous and asynchronous components. Students should keep the listed class times (Tue and Thu 9:00-10:15am) available on their weekly schedules for synchronous discussions and activities. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state
0900:TR   DIST
HIST 219-01 From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-02 and RELG 111-01. This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
1030:TR   DENNY 317
HIST 219-02 Modern Iran
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-05.This remote course will meet synchronously at the times indicated.This course examines Iran's history from 1500 to the present, with an emphasis on political and religious developments under the Safavid, Qajar and Pahlavi dynasties, and the Islamic Republic.
1130:MWF   DIST
HIST 231-01 Modern France
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
French society, culture, and politics from the French Revolution to the present. Themes include revolutionary tradition, the development of modern life in Paris, the French empire, and the impact of World War I and II. Offered every other year.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
HIST 247-01 Early American History
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
An examination of North American history from the earliest contacts between European and American peoples to the eve of the American Revolution. Particular attention is devoted to the interplay of Indian, French, Spanish, and English cultures, to the rise of the British to a position of dominance by 1763, and to the internal social and political development of the Anglo-American colonies.
1330:MR   DENNY 204
HIST 253-01 Autocracy, Uprisings, and Daily Life in Medieval and Imperial Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 253-01. An examination of the early formation of multi-ethnic clans into a large multinational empire. The course explores state formation, the role of women, church power, the arts, nationality conflict and figures such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great.
1130:MWF   DENNY 204
HIST 272-01 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and LALC 272-01.This course will meet synchronously on TR 10:30 - 11:45. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world. This course is cross-listed as LALC 272. Offered every two years.
1030:TR   DIST
HIST 278-01 European Women's History
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-04. This course will explore the lives of European women in the modern period (1789 to the post WWII period). It looks at both rural and urban women, issues of class, family and motherhood as well as demands for social and political rights for women. The readings include primary sources such as housekeeping guides, novels and war propaganda as well as secondary sources such as biographies and anthropological studies. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   DENNY 313
HIST 311-01 Violence and Colonialism
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course will place in a comparative perspective the key role of violence in European colonization in the New World. Two geographical locations will be analyzed (North America and South America) and three imperial powers (English, French, and Spanish) between the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. The goal is not a comprehensive look at the roles of violence in colonialism, but an episodic analysis of the ways in which violence manifests itself in colonial situations across time and space. Topics will include (among others) theories of violence, the origins of colonial violence, the roles of violence in colonizing versus colonized societies, the power and persistence of symbolic violence, and covert and overt resistance to colonial domination.
1330:W   DENNY 204
HIST 311-03 Race and Second Wave Feminism in the U.S.
Instructor: Say Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-03.Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US examines the US's Second Wave feminist movement through the prism of multiracial and anti-racist feminist activism. Oftentimes, the Second Wave is thought of in terms of white-dominated groups, and many believe that key feminist organizations like the National Organization for Women (NOW) were founded by and served only white women. In fact, African American feminist powerhouses like Shirley Chisholm and Pauli Murray helped to found NOW, and women of color organized some of the earliest Second Wave groups.This class will focus on Chicana, American Indian, African American and multiracial feminist thinking and activism. Topics covered will include national organizations, such as the National Black Feminist Organization and Women of All Red Nations; grassroots groups, such as the Combahee River Collective; significant figures, such as Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzalda, and Barbara Smith; key campaigns like that against sterilization abuse; and the significant debates that defined the movement, such as the question of reform versus revolution. This course will also consider the centrality of oral history to the history of women.
1330:TF   DIST
HIST 313-01 Scientific Revolution?
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This class will consist of synchronous conversations and research exercises on Zoom on both Tuesdays and Fridays. Towards the end of the semester the number of our meetings will decline as we refocus on the research paper. In this writing intensive class, we will investigate the development of the powerful ways of knowing we call science. Focusing on the pivotal periods often called revolutions we will examine topics from the decline of natural magic and alchemy and the changing meaning of monsters, to the invention of concepts of objectivity and factuality, to the imperial expansion of natural history and the origins of evolutionary thought, to the development of big science and the rise of cold war physics. In doing so we will better understand our own ways of looking at the world.
1330:TF   DIST
HIST 500-01 Advanced Studies in Late Imperial Chinese History
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description: