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History Current Courses

Fall 2024

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 101-01 The Age of Faith: Medieval Europe Between Church and State
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 209-01. This survey course will study the development of European civilization during the period c.400 to 1500 with special attention to the rise of the papacy and religious conflict. It will consider the impact of such events as the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic invasions, the development of Christianity and the Church, the emergence of feudalism, the expansion of Islam and the Crusades, and the creation of romantic literature.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
EASTC 301
HIST 106-01 Early Modern Europe to 1799
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Society, culture, and politics from the Renaissance through the French Revolution.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 311
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 203
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Say Burgin
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 313
HIST 121-01 Middle East to 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 121-01. The rise of Islam, the development of Islamic civilization in medieval times and its decline relative to Europe in the early modern era, 1500-1750. This course is cross-listed as MEST 121.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 203
HIST 130-01 Early Latin American History to 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 230-01. Survey of pre-Colombian and colonial Latin American history. Students explore the major ancient civilizations of the Americas, the background and characteristics of European conquest and colonization, the formation of diverse colonial societies, and the breakdown of the colonial system that led to independence. The course includes both the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas from a comparative perspective. This course is cross-listed as LALC 230.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 313
HIST 151-01 History of Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in long-term global context. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of world environments in various societies from prehistory to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: environmental effects of human occupation, the origins of agriculture, colonial encounters, industrial revolution, water and politics, natural resources frontiers, and diverse perceptions of nature.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
HIST 170-01 African Civilizations to 1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 170-01. This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as AFST 170.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
LIBRY ARCHCLS
HIST 211-01 History of Climate Change
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
While we may think of climate change mostly in terms of the futures it threatens, it's a human-created disaster and so has a human history. So too do the solutions currently underway to respond to it. In this U.S.-focused class we'll examine and research the rise of fossil fuels, the building of unequal and vulnerable landscapes, the birth and development of climate science, the intentional construction of climate denial, and the consequent failures of climate politics. However, we'll also look at the histories of renewable energy, soil building, mass forest planting, ocean farming, organic farming, protest, movement-building, regulation, and political action. In doing so, we'll help create usable histories for a survivable and ethical future.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 303
HIST 215-01 Settler Colonialism in Comparative Perspective
Instructor: John Truden
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04. This course will use a comparative framework to explore settler colonialism. Both an antropological theory and a historical process subject to contingency, settler colonialism is an imortant but relatively new scholarly tool. In this class, students will first study settler colonial theory and then examine specific relationships between indigenous peoples and settlers in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. The majority of the class will follow a rough chronology from the eighteenth centruy to the present day, focusing on specific topics each week to compare and contrast how settler colonialism has played out in those four English-speaking settler colonies. Specific topics covered might include First Contact mythologies, resistance, genocidal violence, the creation and interpretation of treaties, boarding and residential schools, child welfare and adoption, transnational exchanges between settler communities, environmental change and exploitation, land claims, historical memory, a global indigenous resurgence in the 1970s, truth and reconciliation, and the unresolved present. In some instances, the course may also explore failed settler colonies such as Rhodesia and Manchukuo or draw comparisons with other examples of settler colonialism outside of the English-speaking world, including Palestinem Fiji, and Korea.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 317
HIST 217-01 Life and Death in the Age of Samurai and Geisha
Instructor: Evan Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02. In this course, we critically investigate the surprising origins behind some of the most pervasive icons of premodern Japan. By analyzing a variety of historical sources, including diaries, legal petitions, picture scrolls, and woodblock prints, students will gain insight into what it was like to live in the 13th-18th centuries. Topics include the rise of the samurai as a military and political force, the development of geisha as skilled entertainers, peasant revolts, warrior monks, and the texture of everyday life. By analyzing these sources and engaging with new, innovative scholarship, students will learn how to craft original and compelling arguments that change the way we understand premodern Japanese society and culture.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 103
HIST 219-01 From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-05 and RELG 111-01. This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 317
HIST 253-01 Autocracy, Uprisings, and Daily Life in Medieval Ukraine, Russia, and its Empire
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 253-01. This course will survey the first 1000 years of the eastern Slav lands that are now Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus and the expanding empire of the former into Central Asia and the Caucasus. Students will gain a better understanding of the regions political, economic, social, and cultural development and how it can inform our understanding of Russia today. We will examine the early formation of multi-ethnic clans into a large multinational empire while highlighting state formation, the role of women, church power, the arts, and nationality conflict. The course concludes with the impending collapse of the Russian empire under Tsar Nicholas II.This course is cross-listed as RUSS 253.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 203
HIST 272-01 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02 and LALC 272-01. Part of the Atlantic Slave Trade Ghana Mosaic. While the class is open to all students, students in the Mosaic will be given priority. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world. This course is cross-listed as LALC 272. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 313
HIST 283-01 Latin American-U.S. Relations
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 283-01. A study of political, economic, and cultural relations between Latin America and the United States from the early 19th century to the present. The evolution of inter-American relations is analyzed in light of the interplay of Latin American, U.S., and extra-hemispheric interests. This course is cross-listed as LALC 283.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TR
DENNY 104
HIST 358-01 19th-20th Century European Diplomacy
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 358-01. European diplomatic history from the Congress of Vienna through World War II. This course is cross-listed as INST 358. Offered occasionally.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 311
HIST 375-01 Europe's Dictators
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with GRMN 250-01. Contrary to the hope of contemporaries, World War I was not "the war to end all wars." Instead, at its end Europe emerged into a world of unprecedented turmoil and confusion, a time that was nonetheless permeated with hope, idealism, and possibility. This course explores European politics, society, gender, and culture between 1918 and 1945, focusing on the extreme developments in Germany, Russia, Spain, and Italy during this time. We will examine the emergence, development, form, and consequences of the rule of Hitler, Stalin, Franco and Mussolini and explore the relationship of these dictators to the states that sustained them. Offered occasionally.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MT
DENNY 103
HIST 389-01 Native Peoples of Eastern North America
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 205-01. A survey of major development among Native Americans east of the Mississippi River from approximately A.D. 1500 to the present, using the interdisciplinary methodologies of ethnohistory. Topics to be addressed include 16th and 17th century demographic, economic, and social consequences of contact with European peoples, 18th century strategies of resistance and accommodation, 19th century government removal and cultural assimilation policies, and 20th century cultural and political developments among the regions surviving Indian communities.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 212
HIST 404-01 Activism
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
The seminar will explore activism at different historical moments in different regions of the world, according to the backgrounds and interests of students in the class. Topics will include different historical approaches to the study of activism and explanations for the successes and failures of activist movements.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 204