Spring 2023

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 311
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 211
HIST 122-01 Middle East since 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 122-01. Bureaucratic-military reforms of the 19th century in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire, European imperialism, regional nationalisms, contemporary autocratic regimes, and the politicization of religion. This course is cross-listed as MEST 122.
12:30 PM-01:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 304
HIST 131-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 313
HIST 171-01 African History since 1800
Instructor: Robin Crigler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 171-01. In this course we will study the political, social, economic and ecological forces that have shaped African societies since 1800. We will examine in depth the Asante kingdom in West Africa, the Kongo kingdom in Central Africa, and the Zulu kingdom in Southern Africa. European's colonization of Africa and Africans' responses will be a major focus of the course.This course is cross-listed as AFST 171.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 104
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 211
HIST 205-01 Public History
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Public history explores the ways history is put to work in the world. Public historianswho work in a range of institutionsshare a commitment to making history relevant and useful in the public sphere beyond the walls of the traditional classroom. Sites of public history include educational spaces, archives, and, at times, contested places: battlefields, museums, documentaries, historical societies, national and state parks, local oral history projects, and sites of historic preservation. Public history is firmly rooted in the methods of the discipline of history, but with an added emphasis on the skills and perspectives useful in public history practice and on the ethics of listening to multiple publics. The term public history emerged in the 1970s in the United States with an emphasis on ideals of social justice, political activism, and community engagement. In other parts of the world, public history is often known as Heritage Studies. In this course, students will learn about the evolution of the field of public history, discuss best practices and practical challenges within the field, and will culminate the learning process through work on a public history project in conjunction with the Cumberland County Historical Society.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 303
HIST 211-01 Food and American Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 303
HIST 213-01 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-01. This course will explore the everyday culture of early modern Europe including careful consideration of how people made sense of their world. It will range from examining religious rituals and objects such as relics to natural magic and the popular science that came with the Scientific Revolution. We will also examine the relationship between commoners and the elites while looking at how ideas spread whether by oral culture, images or the new technology of printing.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 311
HIST 216-01 Gender and Sexuality in African History
Instructor: Robin Crigler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and WGSS 202-03. This course examines how African societies have constructed gender and sexuality since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, colonialism and masculinity, queer identities, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, and democracy. We will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, gender and nationalist politics, African women's leadership, and transnational debates over gender and sexuality. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 103
HIST 219-01 Modern Iran
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-02. This course examines Iran's history from 1500 to the present, with an emphasis on political and religious developments under the Safavid, Qajar and Pahlavi dynasties, and the Islamic Republic.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 304
HIST 219-02 From Abraham to Al-Qaeda: Jews, Christians, and Muslims from their Origins to the Present
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-03 and RELG 111-01. This course will survey relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims, from their origins up to the present day, with heavy attention to the premodern period, and to those areas under the political control of Muslims. We will, however, also consider the relations between these three in the modern period, and how the beliefs of these three groups have coincided and collided to generate specific tensions between them.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
EASTC 411
HIST 219-03 U.S. - Middle East Relations
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-01 and MEST 200-04. This course examines the history of US-Middle East relations from the Barbary Wars to the present. Topics will include American travel and missionary activity in "the Holy Land" during the 1800s; the American role in post-World War I diplomacy affecting the Middle East; rivalry with the Soviet Union; Arab-Israeli diplomacy; petroleum policy; anti-American terrorism; and military interventions.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 203
HIST 247-01 Early American History
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
An examination of North American history from the earliest contacts between European and American peoples to the eve of the American Revolution. Particular attention is devoted to the interplay of Indian, French, Spanish, and English cultures, to the rise of the British to a position of dominance by 1763, and to the internal social and political development of the Anglo-American colonies.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 203
HIST 254-01 Revolution, War, and Daily Life in Modern Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 254-01. This course explores Russia's attempts to forge modernity since the late 19th century. Students will explore the rise of socialism and communism, centralization of nearly all aspects of life (arts, politics, economics, and even sexual relations), and opposition to the terror regime's attempts to remake life and the post-Soviet state's attempts to overcome Russia's past.This course is cross-listed as RUSS 254.
11:30 AM-12:20 PM, MWF
DENNY 203
HIST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 259-01 and RELG 259-01. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as MEST 259 and RELG 259.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
EASTC 314
HIST 277-01 European Empires
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
This course will investigate the building, celebration and dissolution of the European empires moving from the 15th century into the 20th century. Definitions of imperialism as it developed over time will be discussed. The readings look at the effects of empire in Europe as well as some of the effects in the colonies, including works by Christopher Columbus, Willam Shakespeare, George Orwell, and Chinua Achebe. Offered every two years.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 311
HIST 284-01 Ecological History of Africa
Instructor: Robin Crigler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04. This course provides an introduction to the ecological history of Africa. We will focus in some detail on demography, the domestication of crops and animals, climate, the spread of New World crops (maize, cassava, cocoa), and disease environments from the earliest times to the present. Central to our study will be the idea that Africa's landscapes are the product of human action. Therefore, we will examine case studies of how people have interacted with their environments. African ecology has long been affected indirectly by decisions made at a global scale. Thus we will explore Africa's engagement with imperialism and colonization and the global economy in the twentieth century. The course ends with an examination of contemporary tensions between conservation and economic development. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 103
HIST 376-01 The Holocaust
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with GRMN 250-01 and JDST 316-01. The course explores the causes of the Shoah/Holocaust, including anti-Semitism, the eugenics movement, the growth of the modern state, and the effects of war. Themes will also explore perpetrator motivation, gendered responses, bystanders and rescuers, and the place of the Holocaust among other genocides. Students will approach the Holocaust through its historiography, which will equip them to interpret facts and understand how and why scholars have shifted interpretations over time. This course is cross-listed as JDST 316. Offered occasionally.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 303
HIST 377-01 Consumerism, Nationalism and Gender
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-01. This reading seminar examines the development of consumerism and nationalism in Europe and America beginning in the late 18th century and continuing on into the post-WWII era - from American Revolutionary boycotts to French fast food establishments. We will look for overlaps or polarities between the movements and the way gender interacted with both of them. Students may be surprised at the gendered aspects of both movements. We will consider, for example, the historical development of the image of women loving to shop, and we will study propaganda from the two world wars with men in uniform and women on the "home front." Our readings will include both promoters and critics of each movement. Offered every two or three years.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 204
HIST 384-01 Immigration, Race and the Nation in Latin America
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 384-01. Characterized by a racially and ethnically diverse population, race has been contested terrain in the countries of Latin America. After independence, some countries embraced the mixed heritage of their societies as a distinctive feature of their national identities while others tried to change it by implementing active policies of immigration as well as policies of marginalization and erasure of Indigenous and Black populations. By looking at different national cases in comparison, this course explores how notions of race, ethnicity, and nationhood have varied in Latin America over time. It discusses such topics the legacies of slavery, racial democracy, Indigenous policies, nationalism, and nativism. It incorporates the experiences of European and Asian immigrants in the region and the impact immigration had on Indigenous and Afro Latin American populations. Class materials will give special attention to the different ways in which scholars have approached these topics over time.Cross-listed as LALC 384.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TR
DENNY 315
HIST 389-01 Native Peoples of Eastern North America
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 205-01. A survey of major development among Native Americans east of the Mississippi River from approximately A.D. 1500 to the present, using the interdisciplinary methodologies of ethnohistory. Topics to be addressed include 16th and 17th century demographic, economic, and social consequences of contact with European peoples, 18th century strategies of resistance and accommodation, 19th century government removal and cultural assimilation policies, and 20th century cultural and political developments among the regions surviving Indian communities.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 203
HIST 500-01 Emotions in History
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:

HIST 500-02 Imperial Rivals: France and Great Britain in the New World, 1689-1763
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:

HIST 500-03 Irish Nationalism and Music
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:

HIST 550-01 HIST Independent Research
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description: