Spring 2020

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 104
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   DENNY 104
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 205-01 Ethnomusicology
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 209-01. This course explores the musical culture of six regions (Africa, India, Southeast Asia, Middle East, North American, and Europe) from the disciplinary perspective of ethnomusicology, a field that emphasizes the direct connections between social structures and musical sound/aesthetics. Students are exposed to the disciplinary methods of ethnomusicology, including its basic terminology and classification systems, and then apply these tools to the study of non-Western musics in a series of analytical assignments and presentations. Some of the questions posed in the class include: What differentiates music from sound, speech, and dance? How does music reflect cultural values and social structures? How does one learn to listen to non-western music? How has globalism affected local musical cultures? How does western terminology limit our understanding of another's music? What are the ideological and physical boundaries that hinder the experience of another culture's music?
1330:TF   WEISS 235
ANTH 222-01 Anthropology of Latin America
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 222-01. This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as LALC 222. Offered every other year.
1330:TF   DENNY 112
ANTH 225-01 Human Osteology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of human biological diversity as revealed through the study of human skeletal remains. We will focus on techniques used to identify skeletal remains in archaeological, paleontological, and forensic contexts, as well as examining human skeletal responses to environmental stress and human growth and development throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite: 100 or 229 or permission of the instructor. Offered every other year.
0930:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 245-01 Divas, Dudes, and Dandies: Anthropology and Global Masculinities
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-04. What is masculinity? What makes you a man? As a society, we normally get around these questions by telling ourselves that we know what a man is when we see one, and that masculinity and/or male genitals makes a man. But is that all there is to it? This course seeks to answer these questions that have been sparking debates since at least the 1950s. The class will uncover masculinity as a rich terrain for anthropological analysis, giving students the opportunity to ask questions about the ways that masculinity is embodied and expressed across cultures and used to contest and re-establish dominant ways of seeing the world. Our mapping of masculinities from around the globe will take us from the NYC apartments of Filipino gay immigrant men (Divas) to the warrior-making ceremonies of Native Hawaiian men, and from a working-class high school in California (Dudes) to Cape Town, South Africa, where Congolese immigrant men (Dandies) treat fashion as a project of social mobility.
1130:MWF   DENNY 204
ANTH 256-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1030:TR   DENNY 212
ANTH 261-01 Archaeology of North America
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 261-01. This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 261. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   DENNY 313
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:R   ARCH LAB
ANTH 331-01 Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 345-01 Babies and Boomers: East Asian Societies in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and WGSS 302-01.Students who have previously taken ANTH 245/EASN 206 Babies and Boomers cannot take/receive credit for this class. For much of the 20th century, East Asia was known as a region of the young. In the past few decades, however, the region has grown markedly older. Countries like China, which used to be concerned about having too many people, now worry about not having enough people to sustain a larger population of seniors. This course examines the causes and consequences of declining fertility and population aging in East Asia. It looks at the impact of changing population composition on attitudes toward reproduction, marriage, family, and gender in the region, particularly in China and Japan. Course materials draw primarily from the work of anthropologists and historians. By the end of the semester, students will complete a research paper on issues related to demographic change in the region.
1330:W   STERN 7
ANTH 345-02 Life and the Anthropocene
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Increased attention human influences on Earths climates and geology has given rise to a much-discussed Anthropocene epoch. Whether we locate the start of the epoch thousands of years ago with the origins of agriculture, with the industrial revolution, or even more recently with nuclear bomb technologies, we find reasons for the label in rapid successions of record high temperatures and severe weather events, polar ice melts and rising sea levels, and astonishing numbers of extinctions, all of which play out in disparate ways across the globe. These changes call for new ways to understand how humans live in the world. In this course we will examine what it means to be human in these times, and how people interact with technologies, environments, and other species in ways that shape these processes and that are shaped by them. Our organizing frame will be ethnography, with examples drawn from throughout the world. Students will develop projects that explore these interactions, and sustainability will be a persistent question during the semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 315
ANTH 500-01 Examining Cultural Resource Management in Pennsylvania through Climate Change
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description: