Fall 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
0830:MWF   DENNY 115
1330:W   DENNY 115
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   DENNY 203
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   DENNY 203
ANTH 205-01 Music and Place
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 355-01.This course provides an introduction to contemporary work on music and place from an ethnomusicological perspective. It situates specific musical case studies within an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that draws from the fields of cultural anthropology and geography, cultural studies, and performance studies. Music often shapes deeply felt experiences of place, belonging and the local while simultaneously possessing a facile capability for travel, displacement and transformation. In the current political climate where nationalisms and regionalisms sometimes escalate in tension with senses of belonging and social solidarities formed via imagined communities and international coalitions, this course looks to sound and music as a lens into understanding how senses of place and displacement, longing and belonging are shaped, felt and experienced. In making an argument for the critical position of music to understanding relations between the local and the global, to understanding the role of the imagination, the body and feeling in shaping the experience of belonging and locality, this interdisciplinary course bridges the arts and the social sciences.
1330:TF   WEISS 212
ANTH 216-01 Medical Anthropology
Instructor: Tony Pomales
Course Description:
Comparative analysis of health, illness, and nutrition within environmental and socio-cultural contexts. Evolution and geographical distribution of disease, how different societies have learned to cope with illness, and the ways traditional and modern medical systems interact. Offered every other year.
1230:MWF   DENNY 303
ANTH 230-01 Ethnography of Postcolonial Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03. This course is intended as both an introduction to the ethnography of Africa and an examination of postcolonial situations in Africa. We will learn a great deal about the cultural, social, political, and economic diversity of the continent while avoiding the typological thinking that once characterized area studies. Through ethnography we will learn about African cultures, their historical contingencies, and their entanglements in various fields of power. We will assess the changing influences of pre-colonial traditions, colonialism, postcolonial states, and the global economy. Offered every fall.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
ANTH 245-01 Digital Asia
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02. Ours is a digital age. Digital technologies and data systems increasingly pervade our lives. They keep us informed, connect us to others, shape our views of the world, and track our behaviors. The countries of Asia, especially East Asia, are no exception. There we find some of the most hyper-connected societies on the planet, where distinctions between offline and online are just as fuzzy as they are here. This course examines the social effects of digital technologies in the Asian region. It treats the digital expansively, placing mobile devices, social media platforms, and games alongside robotics, smart devices, and algorithmic systems of control. In the course, students will deepen their understanding of Asian digital culture by reading the work of established scholars. In addition, they will gain some experience using online tools to analyze relationships in Asian digital worlds.
1500:MR   DENNY 304
ANTH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 300-01 Archaeological Theory and Interpretation
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 300-01. This course explores the concepts and theories archaeologists employ to develop interpretations about and reconstructions of past societies. It examines the history of archaeological inquiry from amateur collecting to a profession and science dedicated to the systematic discovery and analysis of material remains and their interpretation. It will explore different traditions of archaeological inquiry particularly in Europe and the study of Classical archaeology and in the Americas with its roots in anthropology. Students will become conversant with contemporary trends in archaeological theory in both areas from evolutionary, ecological, and systems theory perspectives to agent-based approaches that consider gender, power, and daily practices in shaping past societies. Finally, students will engage with pertinent ethical issues surrounding archaeological patrimony. Prerequisite: ARCH 290. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 300. Offered every spring.
1330:TF   DEAL 1
ANTH 310-01 Nutritional Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
Food is a biological necessity, yet food preferences and dietary practices are culturally determined and highly variable across time and space. This course examines nutrition and dietary variation from an anthropological perspective. We will first study the basics of food and nutrition, including the nutritional composition of food, nutritional requirements across the human life cycle, and standards for assessing dietary quality in individuals and populations. We will then examine the evolution of human dietary practices and we will explore how dietary variation is at the interface of biology, health, culture, and the environment. We will also learn about the effects of globalization and the commoditization of food on dietary choices, the health consequences of under- and over-nutrition, and the social and historical constraints on food production and consumption in different societies. Prerequisite: At least one course in anthropology or health studies, or permission of instructor.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 400-01 Senior Colloquium
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Offered every fall semester, senior anthropology majors will meet to learn about professional career opportunities in anthropology as well as a write a research paper that incorporates primary sources in anthropological writing and/or original anthropological scholarship involving fieldwork or laboratory research.Prerequisite: Research in Anthropology course.
1330:R   DENNY 315