Fall 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 115
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 115
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, T
DENNY 212
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, F
DENNY 304
ANTH 220-01 Ethnography
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Ethnography is a unique form of research through which we learn about peoples experiences in the world and their own perspectives in their everyday lives. Ethnographic research is done in any context, from rural farms, to urban train systems, from medical tourism networks, to nuclear power plants. This course examines ethnographic scholarship with attention to the methods of research. Students learn about the methods ethnographers employ in their work, how they use them, and the kinds of results those methods yield. Examples draw from ethnographic work on diverse topics and in varied contexts throughout the world. Students develop brief projects using some of the methods that are examined. Prerequisite: 101
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 212
ANTH 236-01 Japanese Society
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 236-01. This course is an introduction to contemporary Japanese society. The course examines what everyday life is like in Japan from anthropological and historical perspectives. It explores such major social institutions as families, gender, communities, workplaces, and belief systems. The course focuses as well on the ways in which modernization has affected these institutions and the identities of Japanese people. This course is an introduction to contemporary Japanese society. The course examines what everyday life is like in Japan from anthropological and historical perspectives. It explores such major social institutions as families, gender, communities, workplaces, and belief systems. The course focuses as well on the ways in which modernization has affected these institutions and the identities of Japanese people.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 304
ANTH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
ANTH 261-01 Archaeology of North America
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 261-01. This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 261. Offered every two years. This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 261. Offered every two years.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 313
ANTH 300-01 Archaeological Theory and Interpretation
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 300-01. This course explores the concepts and theories archaeologists employ to develop interpretations about and reconstructions of past societies. It examines the history of archaeological inquiry from amateur collecting to a profession and science dedicated to the systematic discovery and analysis of material remains and their interpretation. It will explore different traditions of archaeological inquiry particularly in Europe and the study of Classical archaeology and in the Americas with its roots in anthropology. Students will become conversant with contemporary trends in archaeological theory in both areas from evolutionary, ecological, and systems theory perspectives to agent-based approaches that consider gender, power, and daily practices in shaping past societies. Finally, students will engage with pertinent ethical issues surrounding archaeological patrimony. Prerequisite: ARCH 290. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 300. Offered every spring. This course explores the concepts and theories archaeologists employ to develop interpretations about and reconstructions of past societies. It examines the history of archaeological inquiry from amateur collecting to a profession and science dedicated to the systematic discovery and analysis of material remains and their interpretation. It will explore different traditions of archaeological inquiry particularly in Europe and the study of Classical archaeology and in the Americas with its roots in anthropology. Students will become conversant with contemporary trends in archaeological theory in both areas from evolutionary, ecological, and systems theory perspectives to agent-based approaches that consider gender, power, and daily practices in shaping past societies. Finally, students will engage with pertinent ethical issues surrounding archaeological patrimony. Prerequisite: ARCH 290. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 300. Offered every spring.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DEAL 1
ANTH 345-01 Cultures of Care in Contemporary Asia
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01.New understandings of health and care have accompanied the economic rise of countries in the Asian region. This course explores how these ways of thinking about health and care connect to shifting social and political norms, changing conditions of work and family, and inherited cultural and religious beliefs in contemporary Asia. Students approach these issues through the eyes of anthropologists and the ethnographies that they write.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
STERN 12
ANTH 400-01 Senior Colloquium
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Offered every fall semester, senior anthropology majors will meet to learn about professional career opportunities in anthropology as well as a write a research paper that incorporates primary sources in anthropological writing and/or original anthropological scholarship involving fieldwork or laboratory research.Prerequisite: Research in Anthropology course.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, R
DENNY 211