Spring 2022

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
DENNY 115
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Mariel Gruszko
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 311
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ANTH 205-01 Music and Sound Ethnography
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 355-01. This seminar introduces students to ethnography as a genre, as a set of practices, and as a repertoire of methods for understanding music and sound in relation to sociocultural life. Through close attention to select ethnographic texts, recordings, and films from the past three decades, students will engage with a diverse range of musical and sonic worlds. Some of the questions to be considered include: What is the relationship between data and story, fieldwork and ethnography, music and representations of music? What might it mean to study a particular musical scene or culture as an insider versus as an outsider? How can we think about sound and/or video recordings as ethnography and/or as method? What might be some of the stakes and ethics of conducting ethnographic research on music? Musical note reading not required. Interested non-majors who do not meet prerequisites are encouraged to seek permission of instructor.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
EASTC 411
ANTH 205-02 Listening Across Cultures
Instructor: Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 209-01.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
WEISS 235
ANTH 212-01 Development Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Sociocultural change, development, and modernization in both Western society and the Third World are examined in terms of theory and practice. Emphasis is on the planning, administration, and evaluation of development projects in agriculture, energy, education, health, and nutrition. The increasingly important role of professional anthropologists and anthropological data is examined in the context of government policies and international business. Offered every other year.
09:00 AM-10:15 AM, TR
DENNY 112
ANTH 222-01 Anthropology of Latin America
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 222-01. This course is an ethnographic exploration of contemporary life in Latin America. It is designed to introduce students to the major themes and debates in the anthropology of Latin America. It is aimed at understanding the cultural and historical development of Latin America, and it seeks to make sense of the cultural similarities and differences that have both captured the interest of anthropologists and helped to make Latin America an important site of anthropological study and theorizing. In the process of examining the histories and cultures of Latin America, we will also look at how power and structural inequalities have shaped the region. The course will study Latin American cultures and societies in relation to neighboring nations - the United States, Canada and the Caribbean - given their shared history and experiences of colonialism and slavery as well as their economic interdependence.This course is cross-listed as LALC 222. Offered every other year.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 313
ANTH 242-01 Research Methods in Global Health: Quantitative, Qualitative and Anthropological Approaches
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
This course introduces students to different methodological approaches used in global health to understand health needs in the global south and design appropriate interventions to address them. Through readings and discussions about the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research students will learn the different ways in which each approach contributes to understanding a health problem and developing solutions, with a special emphasis on the growing role of anthropological perspectives in conducting socially relevant and context appropriate global health research. Pre-requisites: ANTH 100 or 110 (ARCH 110) or 101 or 216 or permission of instructor.
10:30 AM-11:45 AM, TR
DENNY 112
ANTH 245-01 Close Encounters of the Cultural Kind: The Possibilities & Perils of Meeting New People(s)
Instructor: Mariel Gruszko
Course Description:
What does it mean to meet new peopleother humans whose cultural background is radically different from our own? These encounters can hold great promise, revealing new ways to understand ourselves, others, and the earth; but they can also be moments of danger, suspicion, and mutual threat to ways of life. Moreover, these moments of cross-cultural contact are central to the history of human evolution and survival. This class examines peoples encounters with others who are different from them by putting science fiction literature in conversation with anthropological writing on first encounters. Both science fiction writers and cultural anthropologists have conceived of these encounters as moments of massive transformation and as engines of more prosaic cultural change. We will investigate questions like: How do people make meaning from their encounters with difference? When does difference appear as a threat or as a resource? What possibilities for societal transformation have people imagined and enacted as a result of encounters across difference?
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TF
DENNY 311
ANTH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 211
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Nikki Cummings
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, T
ARCH LAB
ANTH 345-01 Anthropologies of Digital Culture
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
This course examines the impact of digital technologies on contemporary life. Course topics will include: the dynamics of social media; the meaning of smartphones and mobile technology; forms of digital labor in platform and gig economies; the place of AI, big data, and algorithmic processing in guiding consumption, extending surveillance, and defining identity; the quantification of self and datafication of health; among others. Course materials will be drawn primarily from anthropology and media studies. As part of the course, students will be required to carry out a writing project on an aspect of digital culture.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DENNY 304
ANTH 495-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
Senior anthropology majors who qualify with a cumulative GPA of 3.6 or higher by the end of the junior year can take this course during the spring semester of their senior year. This course involves writing a senior thesis based on original fieldwork or laboratory research and used to determine departmental honors. Prerequisite: ANTH 400.

ANTH 500-01 How Subsistence Strategies Shaped Human Development and Inform Modern Nutrition
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description: