Spring 2019

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:T   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:W   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 214-01 Ecological Anthropology
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
An examination of human adaption to changing environments with an emphasis on systems analysis. Special attention to development and current environmental problems. Offered every other year.
1030:TR   DENNY 204
ANTH 229-01 Principles of Human Variation and Adaptation
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course explores anthropological perspectives on modern human biological diversity. We examine genetic variation, biological and cultural responses to environmental stressors, including climate, altitude, nutrition, infectious and chronic diseases, and population growth and demography. We use our understanding of human biological diversity to examine the notion that race is a social phenomenon with no true biological meaning. Offered every other year.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
ANTH 233-03 Anthropology of Religion
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
A cross-cultural survey of the functions of religion, magic, and myth in simple and complex societies. Religion and communication. Myth and social structure. A historical summary of the scientific study of religion. Offered every other year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 204
ANTH 235-01 State and Ethnicity in Upland Asia
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03. This course examines the borderlands shared by states in upland Southeast Asia, such as Thailand, Burma and Laos, with China. It looks at dimensions of contemporary migrations and transnationalism among populations historically marginalized, such as the Hmong, and among populations that have a strong identification with states. Linked to political economies and global markets, nationalism and other ideologies defining peoples and their cultures are explored with an eye toward understanding how ideas about race and the other take shape. Offered every other year.
1330:MR   DENNY 115
ANTH 236-01 Japanese Society
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 236-01. This course is an introduction to contemporary Japanese society. The course examines what everyday life is like in Japan from anthropological and historical perspectives. It explores such major social institutions as families, gender, communities, workplaces, and belief systems. The course focuses as well on the ways in which modernization has affected these institutions and the identities of Japanese people.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
ANTH 241-01 Measurement and Quantification in the Social Sciences
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
This course focuses on quantitative data analysis. Students learn how to design, code, and analyze interviews and surveys. Selected databases and statistical programs are used to analyze current social issues and compare samples. Prerequisite: At least one course in SOCI, ANTH or AMST.
1330:TF   DENNY 112
ANTH 255-01 Global Eastern Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course examines global connections in the intersections of culture and power that underlie contemporary issues in eastern Africa. The globally marketed indigenous cultures and exotic landscapes of eastern Africa, like current dilemmas of disease and economic development, are products of complex local and transnational processes (gendered, cultural, social, economic, and political) that developed over time. To understand ethnicity, the success or failure of development projects, the social and economic contexts of tourism, responses to the AIDS crisis, the increasing presence of multinational corporations, and other contemporary issues, we will develop an ethnographic perspective that situates cultural knowledge and practice in colonial and postcolonial contexts. While our focus is on eastern Africa, the course will offer students ways to think about research and processes in other contexts. Offered every two years.
1130:MWF   DENNY 303
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
0900:TR   DENNY 311
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:M   ARCH LAB
ANTH 331-01 Principles of Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 345-01 African Technoscapes
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01. Live-blogging the Zimbabwe coup. Commuting by high-speed rail in Kenya. Using a Vietnamese telecom for internet in Tanzanian schools. Voting, driving, and obtaining health care in Ghana with one biometric ID card. The technoscapes concept emerged almost 30 years ago to characterize how technologies, knowledge, and information move in global cultural flows. Today, lives in Africa are embedded with technologies, infrastructures, and circulations that were scarcely imaginable three decades ago. From road building to WhatsApp, and from genetic maize science to paying for electricity via smartphones, we are concerned with understanding technoscapes in Africa: what they are, how they work and interrelate, and their dynamic mutualities with peoples lives and relationships, experiences of belonging and exclusion. We will examine ethnographic studies of diverse technoscapes, and students will develop projects focused on specific technologies in African contexts.
1330:TF   DENNY 315
ANTH 400-01 Senior Colloquium
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course is based on student independent research projects, supervised by the faculty colloquium coordinator, with special advisement from faculty colleagues. Students taking the course are encouraged to build on previous fieldwork experience or to develop new, community-based projects. In some cases, archival research may be substituted for fieldwork. The course can accommodate honors projects begun with faculty mentoring and aimed at publication. Prerequisite: 240, 241. Offered every year. This course is based on student independent research projects, supervised by the faculty colloquium coordinator, with special advisement from faculty colleagues. Students taking the course are encouraged to build on previous fieldwork experience or to develop new, community-based projects. In some cases, archival research may be substituted for fieldwork. The course can accommodate honors projects begun with faculty mentoring and aimed at publication. Prerequisite: 240, 241. Offered every year.
1330:W   DENNY 315