Fall 2021

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, MR
DENNY 313
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Mariel Gruszko
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 304
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
08:30 AM-09:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 313
ANTH 216-01 Medical Anthropology
Instructor: Amalia Pesantes Villa
Course Description:
Comparative analysis of health, illness, and nutrition within environmental and socio-cultural contexts. Evolution and geographical distribution of disease, how different societies have learned to cope with illness, and the ways traditional and modern medical systems interact. Offered every other year.
03:00 PM-04:15 PM, TF
DENNY 212
ANTH 227-01 Forensic Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
Forensic anthropology is a specialized field within biological anthropology that applies methods in skeletal biology, bioarchaeology and forensic sciences to the analysis of human skeletal remains in medico-legal settings. This course introduces the field of forensic anthropology by examining underlying theory and applied techniques used to identify human skeletal remains. Students will learn the bones of the skeleton, how to create a biological profile of an individual (reconstruct age, sex, ancestry, stature), how to identify trauma and pathology, and how to estimate time since death and possible causes of death. We will also examine the various contexts in which forensic anthropologists work to recover and analyze human remains, including crime scene investigations, human rights investigations, and mass disasters. Ethical responsibilities of forensic anthropologists will be at the forefront of our study.
09:30 AM-10:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 115
ANTH 300-01 Archaeological Theory and Interpretation
Instructor: Matthew Biwer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 300-01. This course explores the concepts and theories archaeologists employ to develop interpretations about and reconstructions of past societies. It examines the history of archaeological inquiry from amateur collecting to a profession and science dedicated to the systematic discovery and analysis of material remains and their interpretation. It will explore different traditions of archaeological inquiry particularly in Europe and the study of Classical archaeology and in the Americas with its roots in anthropology. Students will become conversant with contemporary trends in archaeological theory in both areas from evolutionary, ecological, and systems theory perspectives to agent-based approaches that consider gender, power, and daily practices in shaping past societies. Finally, students will engage with pertinent ethical issues surrounding archaeological patrimony. Prerequisite: ARCH 290. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 300. Offered every spring.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MR
DEAL 1
ANTH 331-01 Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
10:30 AM-11:20 AM, MWF
DENNY 115
ANTH 345-01 Heathy Bodies and the City
Instructor: Mariel Gruszko
Course Description:
This course examines how intersections of space, society, and the body shape health. Concerns about human health driveand are shaped byculturally specific assumptions regarding the relationships between environments and people, and between power and everyday social life. We will investigate how cities (and in some cases rural and suburban areas) are designed around assumptions about who belongs, peoples behaviors, and how place and social organization are intertwined. The course centers race, gender, and disability to better understand how economic and political powers plan for health and who is made unhealthy by or excluded from this pursuit.
01:30 PM-02:45 PM, MF
DENNY 212
ANTH 400-01 Senior Colloquium
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Offered every fall semester, senior anthropology majors will meet to learn about professional career opportunities in anthropology as well as a write a research paper that incorporates primary sources in anthropological writing and/or original anthropological scholarship involving fieldwork or laboratory research.Prerequisite: Research in Anthropology course.
01:30 PM-04:30 PM, W
STERN 12