Faculty Profile

Gregory Steirer

Assistant Professor of English and Film Studies (2013)

Contact Information

steirerg@dickinson.edu

East College Room 409
717.245.2548095

Bio

Professor Steirer’s teaching and research interests include film and television, media industries, genre fiction, and digital culture. He has twice served as a researcher for the Connected Viewing Initiative of the Carsey-Wolf Center in Santa Barbara and his recent scholarship has appeared in the journals Postmodern Culture, Television and New Media, The Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics, and Creative Industries. In the coming semesters, he plans to teach courses on auteurism, the sitcom, the fantasy genre, media change, and video games.

Education

  • B.A. University of Pennsylvania, 2001
  • Ph.D., 2010

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

FLST 210 Crit Approaches & Lit Methods
Cross-listed with ENGL 220-02.An introduction to the basic questions that one may ask about a literary text, its author, and its audience. Study of a limited selection of literary texts using several critical approaches. The course will also offer instruction in the elements of critical writing.

ENGL 220 Crit Approaches & Lit Methods
Cross-listed with FLST 210-03.

AMST 301 American Auteurs
Cross-listed with ENGL 335-01 and FLST 310-04. Auteurs are usually defined as filmmakers whose individual styles and extraordinary control over the elements of production allow them to create unique films that reflect their own personalities and artistic preoccupations. In this class we will examine the work of four contemporary American directors who are usually identified as auteurs: David Lynch, Gregg Araki, Sophia Coppola, Spike Lee, and Christopher Nolan. Through examinations of their films and through readings on film authorship and culture in the United States, we will explore what it means both to be an auteur in general and to be an auteur in twenty-first-century America.

FLST 310 American Auteurs
Cross-listed with AMST 301-03 and ENGL 335-01. Auteurs are usually defined as filmmakers whose individual styles and extraordinary control over the elements of production allow them to create unique films that reflect their own personalities and artistic preoccupations. In this class we will examine the work of four contemporary American directors who are usually identified as auteurs: David Lynch, Gregg Araki, Sophia Coppola, Spike Lee, and Christopher Nolan. Through examinations of their films and through readings on film authorship and culture in the United States, we will explore what it means both to be an auteur in general and to be an auteur in twenty-first-century America.

ENGL 335 American Auteurs
Cross-listed with AMST 301-03 and FLST 310-04. Auteurs are usually defined as filmmakers whose individual styles and extraordinary control over the elements of production allow them to create unique films that reflect their own personalities and artistic preoccupations. In this class we will examine the work of four contemporary American directors who are usually identified as auteurs: David Lynch, Gregg Araki, Sophia Coppola, Spike Lee, and Christopher Nolan. Through examinations of their films and through readings on film authorship and culture in the United States, we will explore what it means both to be an auteur in general and to be an auteur in twenty-first-century America.

ENGL 500 Independent Study

Spring 2015

ENGL 101 The American Sitcom
Cross-listed with AMST 200-07 and FLST 210-03. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American television’s most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcom’s popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genre’s strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of “public sphere” in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.

AMST 200 The American Sitcom
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-01 and FLST 210-03. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American television’s most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcom’s popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genre’s strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of “public sphere” in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.

FLST 210 From Book to eBook
Cross-listed with ENGL 212-01 and WRPG 211-01. Over the last two decades, traditional media forms, such as the book, the newspaper, and the film, have undergone significant change as new technologies altered both the business and the cultural spheres in which they are produced and consumed. At the same time, newer media forms, such as the video game, the search engine, and the social media site, have become prominent aspects of our media landscape. In this class we will examine the process of media change: Where do “new media” come from? How do “old media” change? And is there ever really a time when media aren’t changing?

FLST 210 The American Sitcom
Cross-listed with AMST 200-07 and ENGL 101-01. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American television’s most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcom’s popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genre’s strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of “public sphere” in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.

WRPG 211 From Book to eBook
Cross-listed with ENGL 212-01 and FLST 210-04. Over the last two decades, traditional media forms, such as the book, the newspaper, and the film, have undergone significant change as new technologies altered both the business and the cultural spheres in which they are produced and consumed. At the same time, newer media forms, such as the video game, the search engine, and the social media site, have become prominent aspects of our media landscape. In this class we will examine the process of media change: Where do “new media” come from? How do “old media” change? And is there ever really a time when media aren’t changing?

ENGL 212 From Book to eBook
Cross-listed with FLST 210-04 and WRPG 211-01. Over the last two decades, traditional media forms, such as the book, the newspaper, and the film, have undergone significant change as new technologies altered both the business and the cultural spheres in which they are produced and consumed. At the same time, newer media forms, such as the video game, the search engine, and the social media site, have become prominent aspects of our media landscape. In this class we will examine the process of media change: Where do “new media” come from? How do “old media” change? And is there ever really a time when media aren’t changing?

ENGL 339 Sword and Sorcery
For roughly two decades beginning in the mid-1960s, the genre called “sword and sorcery” was responsible for some of the United States’ most popular mass-market fiction, comic books, children’s cartoons, and action-adventure films. By the mid-1990s, however, the genre had virtually disappeared from American popular media. In this class, we will examine the genre’s origins and the conditions that gave rise to both its popularity and eventual disappearance. We also query its legacy with respect to the broader fantasy genre of which it was a part. Texts will primarily consist of literary works, including novels and short stories by Lord Dusany, Rudyard Kipling, Robert E. Howard, C. L. Moore, J. R. R. Tolkein, and George R. R. Martin. Some time will also be devoted, however, to examining work in visual media.