Faculty Profile

Gregory Steirer

Assistant Professor of English and Film Studies (2013)

Contact Information

steirerg@dickinson.edu

East College Room 409
717.254.8095

Bio

Professor Steirer’s teaching and research interests include film and television, media industries, comic books, video games, and digital culture. He has served three times as a researcher for the Connected Viewing Initiative of the Carsey-Wolf Center in Santa Barbara and his recent scholarship has appeared in the journals Convergence, Postmodern Culture, Television and New Media, The Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics, and Creative Industries.

Education

  • B.A. University of Pennsylvania, 2001
  • Ph.D., 2010

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

ENGL 220 Intro to Literary Studies
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.

Spring 2017

ENGL 101 The American Sitcom
Cross-listed with FLST 210-03. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American television’s most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcom’s popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genre’s strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of “public sphere” in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.

FLST 210 The American Sitcom
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-03. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American television’s most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcom’s popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genre’s strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of “public sphere” in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.

WRPG 211 Media Studies
Cross-listed with ENGL 212-01. In media studies, we explore the ways human communication gets produced, distributed, and consumed. This course examines several different modes of communication (e.g., films, television, novels, video games, sound recordings, software, etc.) to investigate how messages and meaning are shaped by the medium in which they’re transmitted. It also introduces students to critical theories and methodologies employed in the field of media studies. Throughout the course, students will also do regular writing exercises to help develop their analytical writing skills.

ENGL 212 Media Studies
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-01. In media studies, we explore the ways human communication gets produced, distributed, and consumed. This course examines several different modes of communication (e.g., films, television, novels, video games, sound recordings, software, etc.) to investigate how messages and meaning are shaped by the medium in which they’re transmitted. It also introduces students to critical theories and methodologies employed in the field of media studies. Throughout the course, students will also do regular writing exercises to help develop their analytical writing skills.

ENGL 335 The Horror Film
In this course, we will examine the genre of the horror film, with particular emphasis placed on post-1960s slasher films. We will ask what thematic structures, formal features, and industrial conventions characterize “horror” as a cinematic genre. And we will trace the way scholars have studied the genre. Students will gain familiarity in a variety of critical methods, including feminism, queer theory, psychoanalysis, and the sociology of cinema/literature. Primary texts will include Night of the Living Dead, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Sleepaway Camp, Silence of the Lambs, Scream, V/H/S, and American Horror Story.