Faculty Profile

Greg Steirer

Associate Professor of English and Film Studies (2013)

Contact Information

on sabbatical 2024-25

steirerg@dickinson.edu

East College Room 402
717-254-8095

Bio

Professor Steirer is a sociologist interested in the relational practices that shape and define discrete communities. He has published and taught courses on creative labor, media law and regulation, the digital public sphere, media-industry organizations, comic books, television, video games, and horror films. He is the author of The American Comic Book Industry and Hollywood, written with Alisa Perren, (Bloomsbury, 2021) and Legal Stories: Narrative-based Property Development in the Modern Copyright Era (University of Michigan Press, 2024).

Education

  • B.A. University of Pennsylvania, 2001
  • Ph.D., 2010

2024-2025 Academic Year

Fall 2024

ENGL 101 Interactive Media
Cross-listed with FMST 220-03. Much of new media is touted as being distinctly interactive. In this class we will unpack and explore “interactivity” and the “interactive,” historically, culturally and aesthetically. We will work through a variety of media, from the obvious—video games, interactive films, choose your own adventure novels—to the less obvious—the novel, the art gallery, the film. Interactivity, as a concept, will tie together a variety of objects and practices in this survey class. Ultimately, we will ask, what makes something interactive? How do “passive” and “active” media differ? What is the future of interactive media? Example works include Uncle Josh at the Moving Picture Show, Skyrim, Hersheypark, House of Leaves, The Under, Pry.

FMST 220 Interactive Media
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-01. Much of new media is touted as being distinctly interactive. In this class we will unpack and explore “interactivity” and the “interactive,” historically, culturally and aesthetically. We will work through a variety of media, from the obvious—video games, interactive films, choose your own adventure novels—to the less obvious—the novel, the art gallery, the film. Interactivity, as a concept, will tie together a variety of objects and practices in this survey class. Ultimately, we will ask, what makes something interactive? How do “passive” and “active” media differ? What is the future of interactive media? Example works include Uncle Josh at the Moving Picture Show, Skyrim, Hersheypark, House of Leaves, The Under, Pry.

FMST 320 Media and Empathy
Cross-listed with ENGL 331-02. This class asks us to interrogate the role of emotion and empathy in our engagements with media objects. Together we will construct working definitions of “empathy,” “sympathy,” and “pity” and apply these definitions to a variety of media. We will touch on the moral qualities of empathy, and the role of art in “doing good” or “citizen making.” Theoretically, the class will draw from a diverse set of readings—from philosophy to literary studies to neuroscience—and will task students with thinking across disciplines. Concepts drawn from these readings will be applied to a variety of objects: from autofiction and memoir, to video games and virtual reality. The course will culminate in a final critical or creative project which will extend or address key concepts from the class. Example readings/objects include What Remains of Edith Finch, Queers in Love at the End of Time, Up, Blackfish, and Kenneth Goldsmith’s Fidget

ENGL 331 Media and Empathy
Cross-listed with FMST 320-01. This class asks us to interrogate the role of emotion and empathy in our engagements with media objects. Together we will construct working definitions of “empathy,” “sympathy,” and “pity” and apply these definitions to a variety of media. We will touch on the moral qualities of empathy, and the role of art in “doing good” or “citizen making.” Theoretically, the class will draw from a diverse set of readings—from philosophy to literary studies to neuroscience—and will task students with thinking across disciplines. Concepts drawn from these readings will be applied to a variety of objects: from autofiction and memoir, to video games and virtual reality. The course will culminate in a final critical or creative project which will extend or address key concepts from the class. Example readings/objects include What Remains of Edith Finch, Queers in Love at the End of Time, Up, Blackfish, and Kenneth Goldsmith’s Fidget