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Coronavirus Update

On July 15, Dickinson announced that the fall 2020 semester will be remote. Campus is closed to visitors who do not have an approved appointment. Face coverings must be worn at all times.

Additional Information.


Faculty Profile

Greg Steirer

Associate Professor of English and Film Studies (2013)

Contact Information

steirerg@dickinson.edu

East College Room 405
717.254.8095

Bio

Professor Steirer's teaching and research interests include communication, film and television, media industries, comic books, video games, print publishing, digital culture, and intellectual property law. He has served three times as a researcher for the Connected Viewing Initiative of the Carsey-Wolf Center in Santa Barbara and has received a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for 2017-2018 in support of his monograph on intellectual property law and the history of the narrative-based franchise, to be published by University of Michigan Press in late 2021. His other book project, The American Comic Book Industry and Hollywood, co-authored with Alisa Perren (UT Austin), will be published by BFI/Bloomsbury in early 2021. His most recent scholarship has appeared or is forthcoming in the journals Convergence, Television & New Media, and Media, Culture and Society, as well as the collections How to Play Video Games, Point of Sale: Analyzing Media Retail, and Keywords for Comics Studies.

Education

  • B.A. University of Pennsylvania, 2001
  • Ph.D., 2010

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

ENGL 101 The American Sitcom
Cross-listed with FMST 220-01. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American television’s most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcom’s popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genre’s strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of “public sphere” in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.

FMST 220 The American Sitcom
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-04. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American television’s most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcom’s popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genre’s strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of “public sphere” in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.

FMST 310 The Horror Film
Cross-listed with ENGL 331-02. In this course, we will examine the genre of the horror film, with particular emphasis placed on post-1960s slasher films. We will ask what thematic structures, formal features, and industrial conventions characterize “horror” as a cinematic genre. And we will trace the way scholars have studied the genre. Students will gain familiarity in a variety of critical methods, including feminism, queer theory, psychoanalysis, and the sociology of cinema/literature. Primary texts will include Night of the Living Dead, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Sleepaway Camp, Silence of the Lambs, Scream, V/H/S, and American Horror Story.

ENGL 331 The Horror Film
Cross-listed with FMST 310-02. In this course, we will examine the genre of the horror film, with particular emphasis placed on post-1960s slasher films. We will ask what thematic structures, formal features, and industrial conventions characterize “horror” as a cinematic genre. And we will trace the way scholars have studied the genre. Students will gain familiarity in a variety of critical methods, including feminism, queer theory, psychoanalysis, and the sociology of cinema/literature. Primary texts will include Night of the Living Dead, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Sleepaway Camp, Silence of the Lambs, Scream, V/H/S, and American Horror Story.

ENGL 404 Senior Thesis Workshop
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.

ENGL 500 Independent Study