Faculty Profile

Shalom Staub

Associate Provost for Academic Affairs (2004)

Contact Information

staubs@dickinson.edu

West College (Old West) 2nd Floor
717.254.8917
http://users.dickinson.edu/~staubs

Bio

His research and teaching interests focus on 1) various dimensions of conflict analysis, conflict resolution and peacemaking, and 2) the ethnography of religious experience, including “folk” religion, religion and conflict, and the intersection of religion with race, ethnicity, and gender. These interests play out in his courses on conflict and conflict resolution studies, religion and conflict, ethnography of Jewish experience, folk religious practices in the Middle East and North Africa, and immigration and religious diversity in the US.

Education

  • B.A., Wesleyan University, 1977
  • M.A., 1978
  • Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1985

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

RELG 228 Confl, Violence & Peacemaking
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-03.

SOCI 230 Confl, Violence & Peacemaking
Cross-listed with RELG 228-01. This course will examine the nexus of conflict/violence and religious belief in an attempt to understand the confusing array of contemporary conflicts in which multiple sides claim divine authority for their actions. Looking at this "problem" across multiple cases, both domestically and internationally, this course will challenge you to understand the common patterns and variations to religiously justified conflict and violence, as well as the ways that religion can provide the deep narrative for conflict resolution and peace building.

Spring 2015

JDST 247 Saints and Demons
Cross-listed with MEST 250-01 and RELG 247-01.

RELG 247 Saints and Demons
Cross-listed with JDST 247-01 and MEST 250-01.

MEST 250 Saints and Demons
Cross-listed with JDST 247-01 and RELG 247-01.

Summer 2015

HEST 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch
The course is a project-based learning opportunity (PBL) that examines the community health of two structurally similar but geographically distinct regions in Japan and the United States. The PBL project seeks to measure the health of these aging communities based on an investigation of resident “Quality of Life” (QOL). In so doing, the course assumes that high resident QOL is dependent on the effective support of local, regional, and national institutions. The course, therefore, has two fundamental aims: (1) to introduce students to local and national actors dedicated to the support of the aged and (2) to evaluate the role and effectiveness of these institutions on the individual level through quantitative and qualitative research with local elderly residents. The aims of the course are reflected in its structure. First, the course begins with an introduction to regional networks of governmental and non-governmental organizations dedicated to support of the aged. Following this introduction, students conduct surveys and ethnographic interviews with elderly residents in select neighborhoods. Finally, based on data acquired through site visits, surveys, and interviews, students present their evaluation of resident QOL in oral and written form. The course is divided into four main sections: 1. An introduction to the regional network of care providers: Students are introduced to regional networks of governmental and non-governmental organizations dedicated to support of the aged in both settings. 2. An introduction to national health care policy: Students meet regional and national officials and discuss programs and policies related to the elderly. 3. Completion of community based research. Students conduct QOL surveys and ethnographic interviews with elderly residents in select neighborhoods in both settings. 4. Completion of preliminary research paper and presentation. Based on data acquired through site visits, surveys, and interviews, students present their evaluation of resident QOL in oral and written form to interested community stakeholders. This eight-week program invites students to consider the similarities and differences in individual and societal perspectives and approaches to addressing health and aging. Throughout the program students are encouraged to compare across societies those factors which influence the health and well-being of the elderly.