Faculty Profile

Claire Seiler

Assistant Professor of English (2010)

Contact Information

seilercl@dickinson.edu

East College Room 310
717.245.1921

Bio

Professor Seiler's current book project is "Midcentury Suspension," a new literary history of the transatlantic mid-20th century. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Twentieth-Century Literature, Modernism/modernity, and Contemporary Literature. Her courses include Modern Women Writing War, Poetry of the Mad Men Era, and The Generational.

Education

  • B.A., Middlebury College, 2002
  • M.Phil., Trinity College, Dublin, 2004
  • Ph.D., Stanford University, 2010

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

WGST 101 Modern Women Writing War
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-01.This course reads American women’s poetry written about the US Civil War, World War II, and the post-9/11 “war on terror.” What poetic forms have poets adopted or developed to address national and global conflicts? How do poets figure the metaphorical “wars” of sex and gender that are often implicated in those conflicts? How has US women’s war poetry changed from the 1860s to the present—and why? Poets include Dickinson, Harper, Levertov, Mikhail, Nye, Rankine, Spahr, and Trethewey.

ENGL 101 Modern Women Writing War
Cross-listed with WGST 101-01.This course reads American women’s poetry written about the US Civil War, World War II, and the post-9/11 “war on terror.” What poetic forms have poets adopted or developed to address national and global conflicts? How do poets figure the metaphorical “wars” of sex and gender that are often implicated in those conflicts? How has US women’s war poetry changed from the 1860s to the present—and why? Poets include Dickinson, Harper, Levertov, Mikhail, Nye, Rankine, Spahr, and Trethewey.

ENGL 349 War, Race & Am Lit Since WWII
This course studies the inextricable literatures of race and war in the United States since 1945. We will attend equally to how literary forms and critical theories of race and the racial break bear on writing about World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the post-9/11 “war on terror.” Writers will include Hersey, Inada, Komunyakaa, Morrison, Okada, Phillips, and Silko.

Spring 2016

ENGL 220 Crit Approaches & Lit Methods
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.

ENGL 349 Celtic Revival/Harlem Renaiss
This course studies two major art movements of the modernist period, both of which tie formal innovation to questions of national citizenship, racial equality, and political autonomy. How did these “minor” literatures challenge majority national or imperial cultures? What events and forms galvanized the social and aesthetic work of the Celtic Revival (Ireland) and the Harlem Renaissance (US)? Primary readings cover several genres (fiction, drama, poetry, and essays); primary authors include, among others: Langston Hughes, James Joyce, Nella Larsen, Alain Locke, J.M. Synge, Jean Toomer, and W.B. Yeats.