Faculty Profile

Peter Sak

Associate Professor of Earth Sciences (2004)

Contact Information

sakp@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Building Room 137
717.245.1423

Bio

He specializes in describing and quantifying temporal and spatial variations in near surface deformation and landscape evolution. To document variability in regional scale deformation he integrates structural, geomorphic, and petrographic data sets. His current research projects involve field work along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, in central Colorado, and Valley and Ridge of central PA.

Education

  • B.A., Whitman College, 1995
  • M.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1999
  • Ph.D., 2002

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

ERSC 141 Earth's Hazards
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only ‘local’. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.

ERSC 141 Earth's Hazards
This course examines natural processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mass wasting events, and floods that have the potential to produce disastrous consequences for humans. All of these processes result from interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere directly or indirectly, which is the realm of earth sciences. Increasing global populations and increasingly interdependent national economies mean that few disasters are now only ‘local’. This course will use examples such as case studies of recent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to examine how natural processes can be hazardous, and whether or not humans can anticipate and mitigate these kinds of hazards to prevent future disasters. Laboratory work will include analog experiments, field trips, and video analysis of historic disasters. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.

ERSC 301 Field Geology
A course in some of the basic geological field techniques, with the preparation of topographic and geologic maps and reports from data obtained by the student in the field. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 141 and 142, or permission of instructor.

ERSC 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch

Spring 2017

ERSC 302 Structural Geology
The description and analysis of intermediate-to large-scale rock structures. Topics include the analysis and graphical representation of stress and strain in rocks, deformation mechanisms and fabric development, the geometry and mechanics of folding and faulting, and structures related to intrusive bodies. Geologic map interpretation and cross-section construction are used to analyze the structural geology of selected regions. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week; field trip(s). Prerequisite: 141 and 142, or permission of instructor.