Faculty Profile

Jerry Philogene

Associate Professor of American Studies (2005)

Contact Information

philogej@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 16
717.254.8953

Bio

Jerry Philogene specializes in 20th century African American and Afro Caribbean visual arts and cultural history. Her teaching interests include interdisciplinary American cultural history and black cultural and identity politics. Her research interests explore the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, and gender as articulated in contemporary visual and popular culture.

Education

  • B.A., New School University, 1989
  • M.A., New York University, 1993
  • Ph.D., 2009

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

AMST 201 Intro to American Studies
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.

AMST 401 Research and Methods in Am St
An integrative seminar focusing on the theory and methods of cultural analysis and interdisciplinary study. Students examine the origins, history, and current state of American studies, discuss relevant questions, and, in research projects, apply techniques of interdisciplinary study to a subject related to thematic concentration. Prerequisite: 303, Senior American studies major, or permission of the instructor.

Spring 2016

AMST 101 Disorderly Women
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with WGST 101-01. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a “disorderly woman” and what acts are considered “disorderly” and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American women’s narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Paula Gunn Allen, Audre Lorde, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Gloria Steinem while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyoncé. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of “disorderly women” have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.

WGST 101 Disorderly Women
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with AMST 101-01.In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a “disorderly woman” and what acts are considered “disorderly” and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American women’s narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Paula Gunn Allen, Audre Lorde, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Gloria Steinem while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyoncé. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of “disorderly women” have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.

AMST 301 Black Visual Aesthetics
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and FLST 310-02. The course will examine the construction and performance of "black" racial identities through various forms of visual culture. In the class, we will investigate how visual representations, technologies of vision, and the visual arts including specifically film and photography produced in North America (the U.S. Canada, and the Caribbean) and Europe have been used to create and transform the idea of "blackness" at specific historical moments. Specifically, we will look at the films of Sankofa Film and Video Collective, a pioneering group of young black British filmmakers; "blaxpolitations" films in the U.S.; and the work of various Caribbean film makers. In addition, the photography of African Americans James Van der Zee and Lorna Simpson, British-Nigerian Rotimi Fani-Kayode and Jamaican Albert Chong, among others, will be explored to examine the ways in which people of African descent have used visual means to call into question and subvert dominant racial, sexual, and gender categories and ideologies.

FLST 310 Black Visual Aesthetics
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and AMST 301-02. The course will examine the construction and performance of "black" racial identities through various forms of visual culture. In the class, we will investigate how visual representations, technologies of vision, and the visual arts including specifically film and photography produced in North America (the U.S. Canada, and the Caribbean) and Europe have been used to create and transform the idea of "blackness" at specific historical moments. Specifically, we will look at the films of Sankofa Film and Video Collective, a pioneering group of young black British filmmakers; "blaxpolitations" films in the U.S.; and the work of various Caribbean film makers. In addition, the photography of African Americans James Van der Zee and Lorna Simpson, British-Nigerian Rotimi Fani-Kayode and Jamaican Albert Chong, among others, will be explored to examine the ways in which people of African descent have used visual means to call into question and subvert dominant racial, sexual, and gender categories and ideologies.

AFST 320 Black Visual Aesthetics
Cross-listed with AMST 301-02 and FLST 310-02. The course will examine the construction and performance of "black" racial identities through various forms of visual culture. In the class, we will investigate how visual representations, technologies of vision, and the visual arts including specifically film and photography produced in North America (the U.S. Canada, and the Caribbean) and Europe have been used to create and transform the idea of "blackness" at specific historical moments. Specifically, we will look at the films of Sankofa Film and Video Collective, a pioneering group of young black British filmmakers; "blaxpolitations" films in the U.S.; and the work of various Caribbean film makers. In addition, the photography of African Americans James Van der Zee and Lorna Simpson, British-Nigerian Rotimi Fani-Kayode and Jamaican Albert Chong, among others, will be explored to examine the ways in which people of African descent have used visual means to call into question and subvert dominant racial, sexual, and gender categories and ideologies.