Faculty Profile

Jerry Philogene

Associate Professor of American Studies (2005)

Contact Information

philogej@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 16
717.254.8953

Bio

Jerry Philogene specializes in 20th century African American and Afro Caribbean visual arts and cultural history. Her teaching interests include interdisciplinary American cultural history and black cultural and identity politics. Her research interests explore the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, and gender as articulated in contemporary visual and popular culture.

Education

  • B.A., New School University, 1989
  • M.A., New York University, 1993
  • Ph.D., 2009

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

AMST 101 Disorderly Women
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a “disorderly woman” and what acts are considered “disorderly” and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American women’s narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyoncé. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of “disorderly women” have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.

WGSS 101 Disorderly Women
Cross-listed with AMST 101-01. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a “disorderly woman” and what acts are considered “disorderly” and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American women’s narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyoncé. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of “disorderly women” have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice. AMST Representation OR AMST Structures and Institutions

LALC 301 Freedom Dreams
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and AFST 320-03. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black self‐determination; the ideas of “race” and “nation”; racial solidarity and group self‐reliance; self‐defense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakur’s autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.

AMST 301 Freedom Dreams
Cross-listed with AFST 320-03 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black self‐determination; the ideas of “race” and “nation”; racial solidarity and group self‐reliance; self‐defense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakur’s autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.

AFST 320 Freedom Dreams
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black self‐determination; the ideas of “race” and “nation”; racial solidarity and group self‐reliance; self‐defense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakur’s autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.

Spring 2017

AMST 200 The American Face
In this course students will investigate portraiture and self-protraiture as genres of representation and self representation in both painting and photography. Artists we will investigate may include James van der Zee, Diane Arbus, Jamel Shabazz, Kerry James Marshall, Cindy Sherman, Catherine Opie, Renee Cox, and Chuck Close. The course will cover both the theory and practice of portraiture and self-portraiture. Topics include the problem of “likeness”; the social role of portraiture in its ability to depict race, social class, gender and sexuality; its stylistic conventions and iconographic devices. Questions this course will investigate are: What is a portrait? What does it tell us about the sitter and the painter/photographer? Are portraits ‘truthful’ depictions of the sitter? Students will also explore the recent phenomena of the “selfie” and what they tell us about representation, personal identity, objectification, the definition of art, and theories of representation and genre. Reading materials may include: Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography (1980), James Hall, The Self-Portrait: A Cultural History (2016), Maurice Wallace and Shawn Michelle Smith, Pictures and Progress: Early Photography and the Making of African American Identity (2012).

AMST 402 Writing in American Studies
Students research and write a substantial research project, normally drawing on their work in 401. Prerequisite: 303, 401.