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Coronavirus Update

Dickinson is remote for the fall. Prospective students may contact our admissions office and schedule a visit. Campus buildings are closed. Face coverings are required on campus.

Additional Information.


Faculty Profile

Jerry Philogene

Associate Professor of American Studies (2005)

Contact Information

philogej@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 16
717.254.8953

Bio

Jerry Philogene specializes in 20th century African American and Afro Caribbean visual arts and cultural history. Her teaching interests include interdisciplinary American cultural history and black cultural and identity politics. Her research interests explore the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, and gender as articulated in contemporary visual and popular culture.

Education

  • B.A., New School University, 1989
  • M.A., New York University, 1993
  • Ph.D., 2009

Awards

  • Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2014-15

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

AMST 101 Disorderly Women
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-02. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a “disorderly woman” and what acts are considered “disorderly” and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American women’s narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyoncé. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of “disorderly women” have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.

WGSS 101 Disorderly Women
Cross-listed with AMST 101-02. In this course, students will ask the questions: What does it mean to be a “disorderly woman” and what acts are considered “disorderly” and why? In this lecture and discussion-based class, students will seek to answer these questions by focusing on key texts and radical scholarship in the fields of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Euro-American women’s narratives. By doing this, we will interrogate the ways in which women have shaped ideas and experiences concerning race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, labor, and political belonging. We will read novels and essays by Betty Friedan, Audre Lorde, Grace Lee Boggs, and Gloria Anzaldua, while viewing the work of visual artists such as Catherine Opie and Kara Walker, and singers Rhianna and Beyoncé. Using a variety of primary and secondary textual sources, the course will explore how representations of “disorderly women” have been presented in memoirs, essays, visual arts, and popular media to both reflect and contribute to current debates within and about feminism, power, and social justice.

AMST 402 Writing in American Studies
Students research and write a substantial research project, normally drawing on their work in 401. Prerequisite: 303, 401.

AMST 500 Independent Study