Faculty Profile

Crystal Moten

Assistant Professor of History (2013)

Contact Information

motenc@dickinson.edu

239 W Louther St Room 202
717.245.1913

Bio

Dr. Moten focuses on 20th Century United States with specializations in Women's/Gender History and African American History. Her research examines black women's struggles for economic justice in the 20th century urban north. Dr. Moten teaches classes related to United States History, Urban History, African American History, and Women's and Gender History.

Education

  • B.A., Washington University (MO), 2004
  • M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2006
  • Ph.D., 2013

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

HIST 211 Sex and the City
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05.In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which “the gendered city” reflects “complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation.” The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.

AFST 220 Sex and the City
Cross-listed with HIST 211-01.In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which “the gendered city” reflects “complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation.” The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.

AFST 220 African Amer Since Slavery
Cross-listed with HIST 273-01.Focuses on the history of Americans of African ancestry in the years following the American Civil War, which ended in 1865. The course examines several important transformations of African Americans as a people. In the first, we consider the transition from slavery to a nominal but highly circumscribed "freedom," which ended with the destruction of Reconstruction governments in the South. We consider the institution-building and community-building processes among African Americans, and the development of distinctive elite and folk cultures among various classes of black people. We examine the Great Migration north and west between 1900 and 1920, and the urbanization of what had been a predominately rural people. Fifth, we consider the differential impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the New Deal and World War II on African Americans, and the creation of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's - 1980's.

HIST 273 African Amer Since Slavery
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06.

Spring 2016

AMST 200 Civil Rights Hist Thru Film
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and HIST 211-01. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.

HIST 204 Intro Historical Methodology
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.

HIST 211 Civil Rights Hist Thru Film
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and AMST 200-05. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.

AFST 220 Civil Rights Hist Thru Film
Cross-listed with HIST 211-01 and AMST 200-05. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.

WGST 300 Hist of Motherhood in U.S.
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and HIST 311-02. This course examines the history of motherhood in the United States, paying special attention to how the institution of motherhood, and experiences of mothering, have been constructed over time. Throughout the semester, we will examine the changing and multiple meanings of motherhood, how these meanings have been constructed and disseminated through the media, and the impact of these on women’s lives. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the platform of motherhood has been used to agitate for political power, both historically and in contemporary moments. Throughout the semester, we will pay special attention to the ways in which race, class, and alternative ideas about the family have shaped our understanding of the meaning of motherhood. This course will function as a seminar and, as a result, students should be prepared to focus on close readings of texts, careful and original analysis of key ideas, class participation, and written analysis.

HIST 311 Hist of Motherhood in U.S.
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and WGST 300-03. This course examines the history of motherhood in the United States, paying special attention to how the institution of motherhood, and experiences of mothering, have been constructed over time. Throughout the semester, we will examine the changing and multiple meanings of motherhood, how these meanings have been constructed and disseminated through the media, and the impact of these on women’s lives. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the platform of motherhood has been used to agitate for political power, both historically and in contemporary moments. Throughout the semester, we will pay special attention to the ways in which race, class, and alternative ideas about the family have shaped our understanding of the meaning of motherhood. This course will function as a seminar and, as a result, students should be prepared to focus on close readings of texts, careful and original analysis of key ideas, class participation, and written analysis.

AFST 320 Hist of Motherhood in U.S.
Cross-listed with HIST 311-02 and WGST 300-03. This course examines the history of motherhood in the United States, paying special attention to how the institution of motherhood, and experiences of mothering, have been constructed over time. Throughout the semester, we will examine the changing and multiple meanings of motherhood, how these meanings have been constructed and disseminated through the media, and the impact of these on women’s lives. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the platform of motherhood has been used to agitate for political power, both historically and in contemporary moments. Throughout the semester, we will pay special attention to the ways in which race, class, and alternative ideas about the family have shaped our understanding of the meaning of motherhood. This course will function as a seminar and, as a result, students should be prepared to focus on close readings of texts, careful and original analysis of key ideas, class participation, and written analysis.