Faculty Profile

Sarah McGaughey

Associate Professor of German (2007)

Contact Information

mcgaughs@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 114
717.245.1279

Bio

I am a scholar of modernist studies, particularly of the region of Central Europe and of the relationship between literature and architecture as a means of understanding modernism and modernity. My recent book, Ornament as Crisis: Architecutre, Design, and Modernity in Hermann Broch's "The Sleepwalkers", was published with Northwestern UP (2016). I have developed courses on German cultural history of the environment (German Environments) and modern architectural history of Germany. In addition to the teaching of the German language, I also teach topics, such as the Faust legend, pop literature, and performance.

Education

  • B.A., Smith College, 1997
  • M.A., Washington University-St. Louis, 1999
  • Ph.D., 2005

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

GRMN 102 German in Everyday Life
This course is an introduction to the German language as spoken in daily life. It focuses on the acquisition of language skills, such as speaking, reading, writing, and listening and does so while also learning about aspects of every-day cultures in German-speaking countries. Classes are small and emphasize communication. After successfully completing German 101 and 102, students are expected to navigate everyday situations successfully such as shopping, making friends, reading German newspapers etc. and understand basic grammatical and syntactical structures. Classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

WGSS 201 Formations of Grmn Identities
Cross-listed with GRMN 214-01.Taught in German. This course will focus on the representations of class, race, ethnicity, and gender in and of German, Austrian, or Swiss society, including their colonial past (Germany), their empire experience (Germany and Austria), and their clashes with indigenous peoples (Germany). Examples of representation from the fields of art, literature, and film will be the focus of a study of how class, race, and gender have changed and challenged the perception of German identity over time. Students may analyze paintings by George Grosz, Paula Modersohn-Becker, and Kathe Kollwitz; read literary texts by Bertolt Brecht, Verena Stefan, and Feridun Zaimoglu; view films by Fritz Lang, Fatih Akin, and Margarethe von Trotta; or read autobiographies.

GRMN 214 Formations of Grmn Identities
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-03.Taught in German. This course will focus on the representations of class, race, ethnicity, and gender in and of German, Austrian, or Swiss society, including their colonial past (Germany), their empire experience (Germany and Austria), and their clashes with indigenous peoples (Germany). Examples of representation from the fields of art, literature, and film will be the focus of a study of how class, race, and gender have changed and challenged the perception of German identity over time. Students may analyze paintings by George Grosz, Paula Modersohn-Becker, and Kathe Kollwitz; read literary texts by Bertolt Brecht, Verena Stefan, and Feridun Zaimoglu; view films by Fritz Lang, Fatih Akin, and Margarethe von Trotta; or read autobiographies.

GRMN 500 Independent Study

Spring 2017

GRMN 102 German in Everyday Life
This course is an introduction to the German language as spoken in daily life. It focuses on the acquisition of language skills, such as speaking, reading, writing, and listening and does so while also learning about aspects of every-day cultures in German-speaking countries. Classes are small and emphasize communication. After successfully completing German 101 and 102, students are expected to navigate everyday situations successfully such as shopping, making friends, reading German newspapers etc. and understand basic grammatical and syntactical structures. Classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

GRMN 102 German in Everyday Life
This course is an introduction to the German language as spoken in daily life. It focuses on the acquisition of language skills, such as speaking, reading, writing, and listening and does so while also learning about aspects of every-day cultures in German-speaking countries. Classes are small and emphasize communication. After successfully completing German 101 and 102, students are expected to navigate everyday situations successfully such as shopping, making friends, reading German newspapers etc. and understand basic grammatical and syntactical structures. Classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

GRMN 400 A Pact with the Devil
Would you sell your soul to the devil? One of the oldest tales of Central Europe, the legend of Faust begins its published life with a chapbook in the early modern period. After years of continued popularity as a traveling puppet show, Marlowe and, most famously, Goethe wrote plays on this infamous and dark figure. This course will trace the cultural history of the story of Faust. The course will also work closely with Thea Dorn, the 2017 Kade Writer-in-Residence in order to better understand her 2016 novel on immortality and genetic study Die Unglückseligen.