Faculty Profile

Chauncey Maher

Associate Professor of Philosophy (2008)

Contact Information

maherc@dickinson.edu

East College Room 202
717.245.1791
http://users.dickinson.edu/~maherc/

Bio

Are there essentially social or normative aspects to cognition, knowledge, language or action? How so? Those are the sorts of big question that have interested me in my research and teaching. In the summer of 2012, I published a short book on "the Pittsburgh School", a group of contemporary philosophers focused on trying to understand how humans uniquely occupy a “logical space of reasons” .

Education

  • B.A., University of Maryland, 2001
  • M.A., University of Chicago, 2002
  • Ph.D., Georgetown University, 2008

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

PHIL 101 Intro to Philosophy
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.

PHIL 101 Intro to Philosophy
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.

PHIL 201 Ancient Philosophy
This course is an introduction to central questions, claims and arguments in ancient philosophy, centering on the work of Plato and Aristotle. Potential questions include: What is the value of reason and knowledge? What is knowledge? Is it always better to be just than unjust? What constitutes a good human life? What kind of thing is a human being?Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.

PHIL 550 Independent Research

Spring 2016

PHIL 103 Logic
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.

PHIL 261 Intermediate Logic
This is an intermediate level course in logic. It is intended for students who are already familiar with logic, having completed either Logic (PHIL103) or Discrete Mathematics (MATH211). The course has two goals. First, it aims to introduce you to the theory of First-Order Logic (“predicate logic”). How do we prove that everything that can be proven in the system is true? How do we prove that everything that is true (in the system) can be proven in the system? After learning how to prove the soundness and completeness of First-Order Logic, we will consider Gödel’s incompleteness theorems. In the second part of the course, we will consider philosophical questions about logic. What are the laws of the logic? Could there be different logics? Students who wish to develop and extend their understanding of logic (as a formal system, and as the study of proper reasoning) should take this course.

PHIL 500 Independent Study

PHIL 500 Independent Study

PHIL 550 Independent Research