Faculty Profile

Christofilis Maggidis

Associate Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology; Christopher Roberts Chair in Archaeology (2001)

Contact Information

maggidic@dickinson.edu

Keck Archaeology Laboratory
717.245.1014
http://users.dickinson.edu/~maggidic/

Bio

Maggidis is currently Director of Glas, Assistant to the Director of Mycenae, and President of the Mycenaean Foundation with nearly three decades of field experience at major archaeological sites, including Mycenae, Glas, Crete (Archanes, Idaion Cave), and Akrotiri (Thera). Since receiving his post-doctorate from Brown University and a research fellowship from Harvard, his research and teaching interests focus primarily on Minoan and Mycenaean art and archaeology, but they also include topics in Greek sculpture and architecture. Maggidis is the author of many articles, international conference papers, and three forthcoming books.

Education

  • B.A., University of Athens, 1988
  • Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1994

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

ARCH 223 Ancient Greek Painting
A survey of ancient Greek vase-painting (Protogeometric, Geometric, Archaeic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, from 1050 BC to 31BC) with consideration of both mainland Greece and the Greek colonies, and study of ancient Greek (with special emphasis on recently discovered large-scale frescoes in Macedonian tombs), Etruscan, and Roman monumental painting (including selective mosaics). Materials, techniques, and principles; iconography, stylistic and technical developments; styles and regional trends; ancient Greek and Roman masters and their schools; consideration of ancient literary sources (including readings from Pausanias, Pliny the Elder, Cicero). Visits to archaeological collections and Museums. Offered every third year.

ARCH 500 Independent Study

Spring 2019

CLST 200 Ancient Greek Architecture
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-01 and ARCH 221-01. A survey of ancient Greek architecture from the 11th century BC to the 1st century BC, on mainland Greece and the Greek colonies. Temple architecture, altars and sanctuaries; secular architecture (houses, villas, and palaces); public architecture (agoras, stoas, prytaneia, propyla, theaters, gymnasia, stadiums, fountains and aqueducts, fortifications, roads, bridges); poleodomy or city-planning; funerary architecture (tombs, heroa, mausoleums and other funerary buildings). Building materials and techniques; orders and principles of ancient Greek architecture; ancient theory and techniques, typological developments and technological advances, architectural masterpieces; ancient Greek masters. Consideration of epigraphical and ancient literary sources (including readings from Vitruvius, Pliny the Elder, Pausanias).

ARTH 205 Ancient Greek Architecture
Cross-listed with ARCH 221-01 and CLST 200-01. A survey of ancient Greek architecture from the 11th century BC to the 1st century BC, on mainland Greece and the Greek colonies. Temple architecture, altars and sanctuaries; secular architecture (houses, villas, and palaces); public architecture (agoras, stoas, prytaneia, propyla, theaters, gymnasia, stadiums, fountains and aqueducts, fortifications, roads, bridges); poleodomy or city-planning; funerary architecture (tombs, heroa, mausoleums and other funerary buildings). Building materials and techniques; orders and principles of ancient Greek architecture; ancient theory and techniques, typological developments and technological advances, architectural masterpieces; ancient Greek masters. Consideration of epigraphical and ancient literary sources (including readings from Vitruvius, Pliny the Elder, Pausanias).

ARCH 221 Ancient Greek Architecture
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-01 and CLST 200-01.

ANTH 290 Archaeological Methods
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01.

ARCH 290 Archaeological Methods
Cross-listed with ANTH 290-01.

ARCH 390 Cultural Heritage Protection
Who owns the past – individuals, groups, nations, or humanity? What is cultural property? Why do modern states historically claim ownership of cultural heritage? Can illicit trade of antiquities be stopped? Do museums and private collectors contribute to the looting of antiquities? What are the UNESCO conventions for the protection and return of cultural property? These are some of the questions and issues that we will be wrestling with in this course. We will read, write and debate about archaeology ethics, museum acquisition policies and practice, the thriving illicit trade of antiquities worldwide, the international law protecting cultural heritage, the global dynamics and national politics involved in “constructing” and legitimizing their own versions of the past through manipulation of history and appropriation of cultural heritage. In the course of our research, we will examine several case studies of looted, disputed, and repatriated antiquities, focusing on the most notorious and controversial case of looted cultural property, the Parthenon Marbles (the so-called “Elgin Marbles”). A field trip to the Metropolitan Museum in NYC will complement student activities, while guest lecturers will enrich classroom learning experience.