Faculty Profile

Elizabeth Lee

Associate Professor of Art History (2006), Department Chair

Contact Information

leee@dickinson.edu

Weiss Center for the Arts Room 225
717.245.1259

Bio

Professor Lee teaches courses in modern, contemporary and American art as well as in art theory, art historical methods and the representation of gender and sexuality. Her current research explores the connections between turn-of-the-century American art and the history of the body, medicine and health. Her essay, "Therapeutic Beauty: Abbott Thayer, Antimodernism and the Fear of Disease," has appeared in the Smithsonian American Art journal and the medical humanities journal Hektoen International. She is working on a book-length project that examines how matters of health and illness inform artistic practice among Gilded-Age artists and collectors. She has recently received funding for this research from the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the Huntington Library, the Wolfsonian Institute and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, where she is a 2010-2011 Senior Fellow.

Education

  • B.A., Wake Forest University, 1990
  • M.A., University of Minnesota, 1993
  • Ph.D., Indiana University, 2002

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

WGST 201 Gender,Sexuality in Modern Art
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-01. With the rise of industrialization and the growth of the nation's cities, social patterns in American life underwent dramatic change. Between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth, shifts in gender identity influenced ideas about bachelorhood, the nature of dating, the meaning of family and the definition of marriage. New notions of sexuality also transformed heterosexual and homosexual experiences. Art from the period reflects and helped shape these changes. The course considers how artists in America respond to marriage, sexual practice and gender roles through the production of painting, photography and sculpture.

ARTH 205 Gender,Sexuality in Modern Art
Cross-listed with WGST 201-01. With the rise of industrialization and the growth of the nation's cities, social patterns in American life underwent dramatic change. Between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth, shifts in gender identity influenced ideas about bachelorhood, the nature of dating, the meaning of family and the definition of marriage. New notions of sexuality also transformed heterosexual and homosexual experiences. Art from the period reflects and helped shape these changes. The course considers how artists in America respond to marriage, sexual practice and gender roles through the production of painting, photography and sculpture.

WGST 250 Methods in Women's & Gender St
This course will provide an intensive workshop introducing students to a range of methods and theories drawn from different disciplines for the study of gender and women's lives. Students will return to these methods and theories in greater depth in 400. Prerequisite (or corequisite): 200. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.

ARTH 314 20th Century Art
A survey of major artists and movements from post-World War II to the present, beginning with Pop art through Postmodernism and global art today. The course will also incorporate key critical and theoretical writings from the period for discussion. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.

WGST 400 Sen Sem in Women's & Gen St
All topics will draw upon the knowledge of the history and theories of feminism and will be interdisciplinary in nature. Prerequisite: 200, or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 407 Art Historical Methods
Study of the research tools and methodologies of art historical analysis, a study of the use of primary and secondary sources, and documents in art history. In addition, the major schools of art historical writing and theory since the Renaissance will be considered. The course has as its final project a public exhibition in The Trout Gallery curated by the seminar students. Prerequisite: Senior Art & Art History majors only.