Faculty Profile

Elizabeth Lee

Associate Professor of Art History (2006), Department Chair

Contact Information

leee@dickinson.edu

Weiss Center for the Arts Room 225
717.245.1259

Bio

Professor Lee teaches courses in modern, contemporary and American art as well as in art theory, art historical methods, the representation of gender and sexuality and the history of medicine. Her research has been published in Smithsonian American Art, The Journal of American Culture, Nineteenth Century and Hektoen International: A Journal of Medical Humanities. Her current research examines the links between late nineteenth-century American art and the history of the body, medicine and health with a focus on the impact of tuberculosis, syphilis and cancer on artistic consumption and production. She has received funding for this project from the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the Huntington Library, the Wolfsonian Institute and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Education

  • B.A., Wake Forest University, 1990
  • M.A., University of Minnesota, 1993
  • Ph.D., Indiana University, 2002

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

WGST 201 Gender,Sexuality in Modern Art
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-01. With the rise of industrialization and the growth of the nation's cities, social patterns in American life underwent dramatic change. Between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth, shifts in gender identity influenced ideas about bachelorhood, the nature of dating, the meaning of family and the definition of marriage. New notions of sexuality also transformed heterosexual and homosexual experiences. Art from the period reflects and helped shape these changes. The course considers how artists in America respond to marriage, sexual practice and gender roles through the production of painting, photography and sculpture.

ARTH 205 Gender,Sexuality in Modern Art
Cross-listed with WGST 201-01. With the rise of industrialization and the growth of the nation's cities, social patterns in American life underwent dramatic change. Between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth, shifts in gender identity influenced ideas about bachelorhood, the nature of dating, the meaning of family and the definition of marriage. New notions of sexuality also transformed heterosexual and homosexual experiences. Art from the period reflects and helped shape these changes. The course considers how artists in America respond to marriage, sexual practice and gender roles through the production of painting, photography and sculpture.

ARTH 314 20th Century Art
A survey of major artists and movements from post-World War II to the present, beginning with Pop art through Postmodernism and global art today. The course will also incorporate key critical and theoretical writings from the period for discussion. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 407 Art Historical Methods
Study of the research tools and methodologies of art historical analysis, a study of the use of primary and secondary sources, and documents in art history. In addition, the major schools of art historical writing and theory since the Renaissance will be considered. The course has as its final project a public exhibition in The Trout Gallery curated by the seminar students. Prerequisite: Senior Art & Art History majors only.

ARTH 500 Independent Study

Spring 2015

ARTH 102 Introduction History of Art
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.

ARTH 313 19th Century Art
This course surveys key artistic movements and styles in a period of roughly one hundred years, beginning with Realism in the 1840s France and ending with Abstract Express-ionism in 1950s America. Much of the course focuses on painting, though discussions of architecture, design, sculpture and photography also play an important role. We begin with the question of what modernism is: When did it begin? What makes a work of art "modern"? How is modernism different from what preceded it? Students learn to recognize, understand and discuss the defining features of modernism in its major manifestations, while also developing an understanding of themes such as the role of African art in modernism, the changing dynamics between the fine arts and popular culture, the role of technology as an influence on art, and the place of particular critics, galleries, and museums in shaping the discourses of modernism. Individual research projects give students the chance to explore a specific artist, style or theme in depth, while a field trip to National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C. provide an opportunity to see significant works of modern art firsthand. Assigned reading incorporate both secondary sources as well as artist's manifestos and aesthetic philosophies as primary source text. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.