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Faculty Profile

Elizabeth Lee

Associate Professor of Art History (2006)

Contact Information

leee@dickinson.edu

Weiss Center for the Arts Room 225
717.245.1259

Bio

Professor Lee teaches courses in modern, contemporary and American art as well as art theory, art historical methods, gender and sexuality in art and the visual culture of medicine. Her research has been published in American Art, Archives of American Art Journal and The Journal of American Culture, among other publications. Her forthcoming book, "The Medicine of Art: Disease and the Aesthetic Object in Gilded-Age America," on the links between artistic production, health and illness, will be published by Bloomsbury Academic in 2021.

Education

  • B.A., Wake Forest University, 1990
  • M.A., University of Minnesota, 1993
  • Ph.D., Indiana University, 2002

2021-2022 Academic Year

Fall 2021

ARTH 102 Introduction History of Art
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.

ARTH 313 Modern Art
This course surveys key artistic movements and styles in a period of roughly one hundred years, beginning with Realism in the 1840s France and ending with Abstract Express-ionism in 1950s America. Much of the course focuses on painting, though discussions of architecture, design, sculpture and photography also play an important role. We begin with the question of what modernism is: When did it begin? What makes a work of art "modern"? How is modernism different from what preceded it? Students learn to recognize, understand and discuss the defining features of modernism in its major manifestations, while also developing an understanding of themes such as the role of African art in modernism, the changing dynamics between the fine arts and popular culture, the role of technology as an influence on art, and the place of particular critics, galleries, and museums in shaping the discourses of modernism. Individual research projects give students the chance to explore a specific artist, style or theme in depth, while a field trip to National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C. provide an opportunity to see significant works of modern art firsthand. Assigned reading incorporate both secondary sources as well as artist's manifestos and aesthetic philosophies as primary source text. Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 407 Art History Senior Seminar
An intensive seminar wherein students conduct original research on selected works of art as part of curating a formal, public exhibition in The Trout Gallery. Research is directed towards interpretive essays that go through multiple writing revisions, resulting in a publishedexhibition catalogue edited by the seminar faculty member and Trout Gallery Staff, and designed by Dickinson College Design Services Staff. Students work collaboratively as curators and contributors to the catalogue, and undertake a professional-level experience, most often reserved for graduate study or museum professionals. All of the senior majors' art historical knowledge and critical skills will be put to use in the Senior Seminar with the goal of further refining their ability to conduct advanced research and formal, polished writing.Prerequisite: Senior Art History majors only.

ARTH 550 Independent Research