Faculty Profile

Marisol LeBron

Assistant Professor of American Studies (2013)

Contact Information

on leave of absence 2015-16

lebronm@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 10A
717.245.1070

Bio

Marisol LeBrón received her PhD in American Studies from New York University. Her research interests include policing, militarization, incarceration, spatial inequalities, political economy, youth, and race in the Americas. She is currently at work on a book about the growth of punitive governance in contemporary Puerto Rico.

Education

  • B.A., Oberlin College, 2007
  • Ph.D., New York University, 2014

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

AMST 200 Prisons and Punishment in Amer
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-01.The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. More than two million men and women are currently locked up behind bars, a population constituting roughly one in every one hundred American adults. What has led to this phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in the growth of the prison system in American society. We will examine how race, class, education, gender, and sexuality shape the American legal system and impact the demography of prisons. We will also pay special attention to the intersections between the growth of for-profit prisons, the increasing criminalization of low-level drug offenses, and the rise of zero tolerance policing. We will conclude the course by considering alternatives to the current prison system and debate whether we can envision a world without prisons. This course will analyze a wide range of texts including, scholarly monographs, prison writings, documentaries, ’zines, and photographs. Readings for this course will include Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauer’s graphic novel Race to Incarcerate, and Angela Davis’ Are Prisons Obsolete?

SOCI 230 Prisons and Punishment in Amer
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01.The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. More than two million men and women are currently locked up behind bars, a population constituting roughly one in every one hundred American adults. What has led to this phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in the growth of the prison system in American society. We will examine how race, class, education, gender, and sexuality shape the American legal system and impact the demography of prisons. We will also pay special attention to the intersections between the growth of for-profit prisons, the increasing criminalization of low-level drug offenses, and the rise of zero tolerance policing. We will conclude the course by considering alternatives to the current prison system and debate whether we can envision a world without prisons. This course will analyze a wide range of texts including, scholarly monographs, prison writings, documentaries, ’zines, and photographs. Readings for this course will include Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauer’s graphic novel Race to Incarcerate, and Angela Davis’ Are Prisons Obsolete?