Faculty Profile

Marisol LeBron

Assistant Professor of American Studies (2013)

Contact Information

lebronm@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 302
717.245.1070

Bio

Marisol LeBrón received her PhD in American Studies from New York University. Her research interests include policing, militarization, incarceration, spatial inequalities, political economy, youth, and race in the Americas. She is currently at work on a book about the growth of punitive governance in contemporary Puerto Rico.

Education

  • B.A., Oberlin College, 2007
  • Ph.D., New York University, 2014

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

AMST 303 Theories of Power & Resistance
This course will introduce students to key theorists and central theoretical approaches that have shaped the way scholars in the field of American Studies think about power and resistance. Specifically, we will examine the work of Antonio Gramsci, Michel Foucault, Stuart Hall, and Judith Butler and consider how American Studies scholars have taken up the work of these thinkers in order to examine difference, inequality, culture, history, governance, and social movements in the Americas. In this way, we will work across the fields of gender and sexuality studies, cultural studies, race and ethnic studies, and postcolonial studies, to understand the influence of these theorists’ work in an American Studies context. Grounding our discussions also in students’ research interests, this course will give students a strong understanding of key theoretical approaches within American Studies while equipping them with necessary tools connect these theories to their own interests as they develop compelling research questions and prepare to embark upon their own projects.

Spring 2018

AMST 200 Black and Latinx Intersections
Cross-listed with LALC 200-03. As Latinx population growth outpaced African American population growth over the course of the 2000s, a discourse of conflict and competition between the two groups started to take center stage. Scholars, journalists, and pundits argued that the new status of Latinxs as the “majority minority” population in the United States would diminish Black political and economic power and further exacerbate tensions between African American and Latinx groups. This course troubles sensationalistic accounts of Black and Latinx conflict by focusing on what interactions between African Americans and Latinx groups illuminate about race and power relations in the United States. We will focus special attention on the history of coalitional organizing between African American and Latinx groups, as well as the ways that Afro-Latinxs challenge narrow understandings of both Blackness and Latinidad. Ultimately, students will learn about the shifting history of racial power relations in the United States and the coalitional efforts undertaken by marginalized groups in order to affect social change.

AMST 200 Prisons and Punishment in Amer
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-01. The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. More than two million men and women are currently locked up behind bars, a population constituting roughly one in every one hundred American adults. What has led to this phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in the growth of the prison system in American society. We will examine how race, class, education, gender, and sexuality shape the American legal system and impact the demography of prisons. We will also pay special attention to the intersections between the growth of for-profit prisons, the increasing criminalization of low-level drug offenses, and the rise of zero tolerance policing. We will conclude the course by considering alternatives to the current prison system and debate whether we can envision a world without prisons. This course will analyze a wide range of texts including, scholarly monographs, prison writings, documentaries, ’zines, and photographs. Readings for this course will include Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauer’s graphic novel Race to Incarcerate, and Angela Davis’ Are Prisons Obsolete?

LALC 200 Black and Latinx Intersections
Cross-listed with AMST 200-03. As Latinx population growth outpaced African American population growth over the course of the 2000s, a discourse of conflict and competition between the two groups started to take center stage. Scholars, journalists, and pundits argued that the new status of Latinxs as the “majority minority” population in the United States would diminish Black political and economic power and further exacerbate tensions between African American and Latinx groups. This course troubles sensationalistic accounts of Black and Latinx conflict by focusing on what interactions between African Americans and Latinx groups illuminate about race and power relations in the United States. We will focus special attention on the history of coalitional organizing between African American and Latinx groups, as well as the ways that Afro-Latinxs challenge narrow understandings of both Blackness and Latinidad. Ultimately, students will learn about the shifting history of racial power relations in the United States and the coalitional efforts undertaken by marginalized groups in order to affect social change.

AMST 201 Intro to American Studies
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.

SOCI 230 Prisons and Punishment in Amer
Cross-listed with AMST 200-02. The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. More than two million men and women are currently locked up behind bars, a population constituting roughly one in every one hundred American adults. What has led to this phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in the growth of the prison system in American society. We will examine how race, class, education, gender, and sexuality shape the American legal system and impact the demography of prisons. We will also pay special attention to the intersections between the growth of for-profit prisons, the increasing criminalization of low-level drug offenses, and the rise of zero tolerance policing. We will conclude the course by considering alternatives to the current prison system and debate whether we can envision a world without prisons. This course will analyze a wide range of texts including, scholarly monographs, prison writings, documentaries, ’zines, and photographs. Readings for this course will include Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauer’s graphic novel Race to Incarcerate, and Angela Davis’ Are Prisons Obsolete?