Faculty Profile

Sharon Kingston

Associate Professor of Psychology (2009)

Contact Information

kingstos@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Building Room 170
717.245.1076

Bio

Sharon Kingston is a clinical community psychologist. Her research interests include neighborhood effects on individual and family well-being with particular emphasis on identifying aspects of successful parenting in high-risk urban neighborhoods, prevention and health promotion in low-income communities and factors related to early initiation of substance use among children and adolescents.

Education

  • B.A., State University of New York at Purchase, 1989
  • M.A., University of Rhode Island, 1996
  • Ph.D., 2001

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

PSYC 175 Intro to Community Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective.

PSYC 175 Intro to Community Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to the field of community psychology--a field that focuses on persons-in-context and the ways that social issues, institutions, and settings impact individuals' mental health and wellbeing. In the course, we will: (a) review the historical underpinnings of community psychology; (b) examine the field's major tenets and theories, including its emphasis on understanding the role of the environment in human behavior; (c) explore the field's application to a range of clinical and social issues; and (d) emulate the field's commitment to the promotion of social change through research and action. This course is a Health Studies elective.

HEST 400 Senior Sem in Health Studies
The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the impact of national healthcare reform on local individuals’ experiences of healthcare and healthcare seeking. We will begin the course with a review of the U.S. Health Care System, current policies, and proposed legislative changes to include an identification of the system’s strengths and weaknesses. We will then look in depth at pathways between policy and health for individuals, focusing on structural inequalities and social determinants of health. To ensure a comprehensive review of the health system and proposals to improve overall system performance, we will survey literature from numerous disciplines to include anthropology, psychology, sociology, economics, public health, and health policy. With support from the Partnership for Better Health, students will conduct community-based research with local residents, agency clients, and healthcare users. The students will develop an interview guide; conduct in-depth interviews; and, code and analyze qualitative data generated from the interviews. Students then will use the research results to write a report to include academic background information, the methodology used, the findings, and discussion. The report will inform decisions made by community partners in collaboration with regional healthcare providers to improve population and individual health status within the foundation’s defined service area. Learning goals: - effective team building and collaboration - professional conduct in communication and collaboration with a community partner - high quality oral and written final reports suitable for a community partner - interdisciplinary examination of national health care reform - understanding of different pathways between policy and health seeking or health outcomes - skills associated with qualitative research including the development of interview guides; completion of interviews; coding and analysis data generated from the interviews; and, preparation of presentation and reports of the research findings.