Faculty Profile

Marcus Key

Joseph Priestley Professor of Natural Philosophy (1989)

Contact Information

key@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Building Room 143
717.245.1448
http://www.dickinson.edu/info/20107/earth_sciences/1835/marcus_key

Bio

His teaching interests are sedimentology, stratigraphy, paleontology, evolution, extinction, energy resources, and sustainability. His research interests involve inferring evolutionary and sedimentary patterns and processes using fossil and living bryozoans. His current research involves evolution of biomineralization, marine biofouling, functional morphology of bryozoans, and geoarcheology.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.S., University of Texas at Austin, 1983
  • M.Phil., Yale University, 1986
  • Ph.D., 1988

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

ERSC 309 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Completion of both ERSC 305 and ERSC 309 fulfills the WR Requirement.

ERSC 500 Independent Study

Spring 2016

ERSC 142 Earth History
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.

ERSC 142 Earth History
An overview of our understanding of climate processes and their interaction with the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere based on studies of ancient climates, which inform our understanding of climate change now and into the future. Topics include drivers of climate change at different time scales, evidence for climate change, and major climate events such as ice ages. Emphasis will be placed on the last 1 million years of earth history as a prelude to discussing potential anthropogenic impacts on the climate. Case studies of major climate “players” such as the US and China will be contrasted with those most vulnerable, Africa and SE Asia to determine mitigation and adaptation strategies. The lab component will use historic climate data, field experiences, and climate modeling to interpret climate change processes. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.

ERSC 202 Energy Resources
The study of the origin, geologic occurrence, and distribution of petroleum, natural gas, coal, and uranium. Discussions include the evaluation and exploitation, economics, law, and the environmental impact of these resources and their alternatives, including geothermal, wind, solar, tidal, and ocean thermal power. Prerequisites: Any DIV III lab science (not MATH). This course is cross-listed as ENST 202. Offered every other year.

ERSC 500 Independent Study

ERSC 550 Independent Research

ERSC 550 Independent Research