Faculty Profile

Marcus Key

Joseph Priestley Professor of Natural Philosophy (1989)

Contact Information

key@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Building Room 143
717.245.1448
http://www.dickinson.edu/info/20107/earth_sciences/1835/marcus_key

Bio

His teaching interests are sedimentology, stratigraphy, paleontology, evolution, extinction, energy resources, and sustainability. His research interests involve inferring evolutionary and sedimentary patterns and processes using fossil and living bryozoans. His current research involves evolution of biomineralization, marine biofouling, functional morphology of bryozoans, and geoarcheology.

Education

  • B.S., University of Texas at Austin, 1983
  • M.Phil., Yale University, 1986
  • Ph.D., 1988

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

ERSC 142 Earth History
A study of the origin and evolution of the Earth, continents, atmosphere, ocean, and life over 4.6 billion years of Earth history. Topics will include deep time; plate tectonics and mountain building; continental position, ocean circulation, and climate change; expansion of biodiversity from single cells to higher order plants and animals including the rise of humans; mass extinctions; the theory of evolution; and the influence of historic earth processes on the formation of mineral and energy resources. Labs and Field trips will test geological and paleontological hypotheses regarding the reconstruction and interpretation of ancient sedimentary environments and biomes in the local area. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.

ERSC 142 Earth History
A study of the origin and evolution of the Earth, continents, atmosphere, ocean, and life over 4.6 billion years of Earth history. Topics will include deep time; plate tectonics and mountain building; continental position, ocean circulation, and climate change; expansion of biodiversity from single cells to higher order plants and animals including the rise of humans; mass extinctions; the theory of evolution; and the influence of historic earth processes on the formation of mineral and energy resources. Labs and Field trips will test geological and paleontological hypotheses regarding the reconstruction and interpretation of ancient sedimentary environments and biomes in the local area. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.

Spring 2015

ERSC 307 Paleontology
A systematic study of the invertebrate and vertebrate fossil groups, plants, and their evolution and relationships to living forms. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 141 or 142, or any 100-level BIOL course. This course fulfills the DIV III lab science distribution requirement.