Faculty Profile

Amy Farrell

Professor of American Studies and Women's and Gender Studies; John J. Curley '60 and Ann Conser Curley '63 Faculty Chair in the Liberal Arts; Executive Director of the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues (1991)

Contact Information

farrell@dickinson.edu

255 W Louther St
717.245.1869

Bio

Amy E. Farrell is the Ann and John Curley Chair of Liberal Arts and Professor of American Studies and Women's and Gender Studies at Dickinson College. Her research focuses on the history of second wave feminism, representations of gender and feminism in popular culture, and the history and representation of the body and fatness. She is the author of two books: Yours in Sisterhood: Ms. Magazine and the Promise of Popular Feminism (University of North Carolina Press, 1998) and Fat Shame: Stigma and the fat Body in American Culture (New York University Press, 2011).

Education

  • B.A., Ohio University, 1985
  • M.A., University of Minnesota, 1988
  • Ph.D., 1991

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

WGST 250 Methods in Women's & Gender St
This course will provide an intensive workshop introducing students to a range of methods and theories drawn from different disciplines for the study of gender and women's lives. Students will return to these methods and theories in greater depth in 400. Prerequisite (or corequisite): 200.

Spring 2016

AMST 200 Fat Studies
Cross-listed with WGST-202-02. This course introduces students to an emerging academic field, Fat Studies. By drawing from historical, cultural, and social texts, Fat Studies explores the meaning of fatness within the U.S. and also from comparative global perspectives. Students will examine the development of fat stigma and the ways it intersects with gendered, racial, ethnic and class constructions. Not a biomedical study of the obesity epidemic, this course instead will interrogate the very vocabulary used to describe our current crisis. Finally, students will become familiar with the wide range of activists whose work has challenged fat stigma and developed alternative models of health and beauty.

WGST 202 Fat Studies
Cross-listed with AMST 200-02. This course introduces students to an emerging academic field, Fat Studies. By drawing from historical, cultural, and social texts, Fat Studies explores the meaning of fatness within the U.S. and also from comparative global perspectives. Students will examine the development of fat stigma and the ways it intersects with gendered, racial, ethnic and class constructions. Not a biomedical study of the obesity epidemic, this course instead will interrogate the very vocabulary used to describe our current crisis. Finally, students will become familiar with the wide range of activists whose work has challenged fat stigma and developed alternative models of health and beauty.