Faculty Profile

Lars English

Associate Professor of Physics (2003)

Contact Information

englishl@dickinson.edu

Tome Scientific Building Room 219
717.254.8925
http://www.larsenglish.com

Bio

Professor English's research interests focus on the dynamics of nonlinear lattices and networks. Physical systems under investigation range from the microscopic (magnetic crystals / spin lattices) to the macroscopic (coupled pendulum arrays). Driven electrical lattices - comprised of inductors and diodes - have been a recent experimental focus; here we study the spontaneous emergence of highly localized voltage-patterns. A recent numerical project modeled learning in a neural network.

Education

  • B.S., Denison University, 1996
  • M.S., Cornell University, 1999
  • Ph.D., 2003

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

PHYS 141 Physics for the Life Sciences
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.

PHYS 141 Physics for the Life Sciences
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.

Spring 2018

PHYS 212 Intro Relativistic/Quant Phys
Completion of both PHYS 211 and PHYS 212 fulfills the WID Requirement.

PHYS 361 Electrons in Materials
This course will examine the behavior of the electron when it finds itself in the confines of a crystal lattice. We look at the quantum states and energies available to electrons in periodic potentials, electronic band structure and occupation, and the resulting electronic properties of various classes of materials such as insulators, metals, and semiconductors. The course will also cover semiconductor devices and how they work from a fundamental perspective. Students are assumed to have taken Phys 132 and Phys 212, and therefore to have some familiarity with introductory quantum mechanics; some prior exposure to thermodynamics/statistical mechanics is helpful but not assumed. The course should be of particular interest to students interested in engineering, including (but not limited to) students on the physics-engineering or 3-2 engineering track.