Faculty Profile

Eva Copeland

Associate Professor of Spanish (2005)

Contact Information

on sabbatical Spring 2017

copelane@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 122
717.254.8152

Bio

Her teaching and research interests include 18th- and 19th-century literature, gender and sexuality studies and cultural studies. She is currently working on a book which explores constructions of masculinity and the intersections of gender, nation, and sexuality in the 19th-century Spanish realist novel.

Education

  • B.A., Colgate University, 1994
  • M.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1999
  • Ph.D., 2004

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on speaking. Prerequisite: 101. Upon completion, students go to 201.

WGSS 301 Spain at Turn of Century
Cross-listed with SPAN 410-01. This seminar will focus on literature and culture in Spain from 1875-1898. We will read several novels, short stories, and a play, as well as primary texts from the period such as magazine and newspaper articles and excerpts from legal and medical texts. Topics of inquiry will include representations of normative masculine and feminine gender roles and gender and sexual deviance, emerging theories about alternative sexualities during the late nineteenth century, the intersectionality of categories of race, class, gender and sexuality, and national identity and empire in the context of the loss of the last Spanish colonies.

SPAN 410 Spain at Turn of Century
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-03. This seminar will focus on literature and culture in Spain from 1875-1898. We will read several novels, short stories, and a play, as well as primary texts from the period such as magazine and newspaper articles and excerpts from legal and medical texts. Topics of inquiry will include representations of normative masculine and feminine gender roles and gender and sexual deviance, emerging theories about alternative sexualities during the late nineteenth century, the intersectionality of categories of race, class, gender and sexuality, and national identity and empire in the context of the loss of the last Spanish colonies.