Faculty Profile

Jonathan Cogliano

Assistant Professor of Economics (2013)

Contact Information

coglianj@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 112
717.245.1841

Bio

Education

  • B.A., University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 2007
  • Ph.D., New School for Social Research, 2013

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

AMST 200 American Capitalism
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with ECON 223-02 and SOCI 230-05.Designed for those interested in social activism and social justice, this course draws on critical perspectives from Political Economy, American Studies and Sociology to examine how power is structured in American capitalism across institutions including the social relations of production and distribution, corporations, and markets. Special attention is given to the ways in which powerful economic groups and organizations are able to exert economic control, influence government, and dominate American institutions, such as the media, that shape American culture. Looking beyond capitalism, social movements for greater social and economic justice, and greater economic and political democracy are also examined.

AMST 200 American Capitalism
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with ECON 223-01 and SOCI 230-04.Designed for those interested in social activism and social justice, this course draws on critical perspectives from Political Economy, American Studies and Sociology to examine how power is structured in American capitalism across institutions including the social relations of production and distribution, corporations, and markets. Special attention is given to the ways in which powerful economic groups and organizations are able to exert economic control, influence government, and dominate American institutions, such as the media, that shape American culture. Looking beyond capitalism, social movements for greater social and economic justice, and greater economic and political democracy are also examined.

ECON 223 American Capitalism
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with AMST 200-05 and SOCI 230-05.

ECON 223 American Capitalism
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with AMST 200-04 and SOCI 230-04.

SOCI 230 American Capitalism
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with AMST 200-04 and ECON 223-01.Designed for those interested in social activism and social justice, this course draws on critical perspectives from Political Economy, American Studies and Sociology to examine how power is structured in American capitalism across institutions including the social relations of production and distribution, corporations, and markets. Special attention is given to the ways in which powerful economic groups and organizations are able to exert economic control, influence government, and dominate American institutions, such as the media, that shape American culture. Looking beyond capitalism, social movements for greater social and economic justice, and greater economic and political democracy are also examined.

SOCI 230 American Capitalism
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with AMST 200-05 and ECON 223-02.Designed for those interested in social activism and social justice, this course draws on critical perspectives from Political Economy, American Studies and Sociology to examine how power is structured in American capitalism across institutions including the social relations of production and distribution, corporations, and markets. Special attention is given to the ways in which powerful economic groups and organizations are able to exert economic control, influence government, and dominate American institutions, such as the media, that shape American culture. Looking beyond capitalism, social movements for greater social and economic justice, and greater economic and political democracy are also examined.