Faculty Profile

Marcelo Borges

Professor of History (1997), Department Chair

Contact Information

borges@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 111
717.245.1186
http://users.dickinson.edu/~borges/

Bio

He teaches Latin American, Iberian, and comparative history. His current research deals with transatlantic migration from Portugal to Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly to Argentina; and with migration, identity and community formation in the oil fields of Patagonia, Argentina.

Education

  • Licenciado en Historia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1988
  • Profesor en Historia, 1988
  • Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1997

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

HIST 130 Latin American History I
Cross-listed with LALC 230-01.

LALC 230 Early Lat Am History to 1800
Cross-listed with HIST 130-01.

LALC 300 Immigration Race Nation in LA
Cross-listed with HIST 315-01. Characterized by a racially and ethnically diverse population, race has been contested terrain in the countries of Latin America. After independence, some countries embraced the mixed heritage of their populations as a distinctive feature of their national identities while others tried to change it by implementing active policies of immigration, especially from Europe. By looking at different national cases in comparison, this course explores how notions of race, ethnicity, and nationhood have varied in Latin America over time. The course will focus on both the views of key intellectuals and policy-makers as well as on the experiences and actions of peoples of diverse origins. It will discuss topics such as the legacy of slavery, racial democracy, indigenous policies, nationalism and nativism, and the comparative experiences of European and Asian immigrants in the region. Class discussion will give special attention to the different ways in which scholars have approached these topics over time.

HIST 315 Immigration Race Nation in LA
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01. Characterized by a racially and ethnically diverse population, race has been contested terrain in the countries of Latin America. After independence, some countries embraced the mixed heritage of their populations as a distinctive feature of their national identities while others tried to change it by implementing active policies of immigration, especially from Europe. By looking at different national cases in comparison, this course explores how notions of race, ethnicity, and nationhood have varied in Latin America over time. The course will focus on both the views of key intellectuals and policy-makers as well as on the experiences and actions of peoples of diverse origins. It will discuss topics such as the legacy of slavery, racial democracy, indigenous policies, nationalism and nativism, and the comparative experiences of European and Asian immigrants in the region. Class discussion will give special attention to the different ways in which scholars have approached these topics over time.

LALC 490 Lat Am Interdisciplinary Res
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.

HIST 550 Independent Research

Spring 2015

HIST 131 Latin American History II
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01.

LALC 200 Latin American History in Film
Cross-listed with HIST 215 01 and FLST 210 05.

FLST 210 Latin American History in Film
Cross-listed with HIST 215-01 and LALC 200-01.

HIST 215 Latin American History in Film
Cross-listed with FLST 210-05 and LALC 200-01.

LALC 231 Mod Lat Am Hist since 1800
Cross-listed with HIST 131 01.

LALC 490 Lat Am Interdisciplinary Res
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.