Faculty Profile

Marcelo Borges

Professor of History (1997)

Contact Information

borges@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 111
717.245.1186
http://users.dickinson.edu/~borges/

Bio

He teaches Latin American, Iberian, and comparative history. His current research deals with transatlantic migration from Portugal to Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly to Argentina; and with migration, identity and community formation in the oil fields of Patagonia, Argentina.

Education

  • Licenciado en Historia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1988
  • Profesor en Historia, 1988
  • Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1997

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

HIST 130 Early Lat Am History to 1800
Cross-listed with LALC 230-01.

LALC 230 Early Lat Am History to 1800
Cross-listed with HIST 130-01.

HIST 283 Latin American-U.S. Relations
Cross-listed with LALC 283-01.

LALC 283 Latin American-U.S. Relations
Cross-listed with HIST 283-01.

LALC 490 Lat Am Interdisciplinary Res
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.

HIST 500 Independent Study

HIST 550 Independent Research

HIST 550 Independent Research

Spring 2018

LALC 200 World Migrations Since 1850
Cross-listed with HIST 215-03. This course will examine human mobility since the middle of the nineteenth century by comparing different historical moments, societies, and experiences. The basic questions it seeks to address are: Why have people moved in different historical moments and across different spaces? How have they been received by other societies? What regimes of state control have emerged over time and why? Why have some migrants been welcomed as new citizens while others have been rejected as a menace to receiving societies’ values and culture? How have migrants accommodated to or challenged the reality of migration and transnational lives? It will include a wide variety of migrant experiences, such as labor migrations, migrations in imperial and post-colonial spaces, family migration, and displaced peoples and refugees.

HIST 215 World Migrations Since 1850
Cross-listed with LALC 200-08. This course will examine human mobility since the middle of the nineteenth century by comparing different historical moments, societies, and experiences. The basic questions it seeks to address are: Why have people moved in different historical moments and across different spaces? How have they been received by other societies? What regimes of state control have emerged over time and why? Why have some migrants been welcomed as new citizens while others have been rejected as a menace to receiving societies’ values and culture? How have migrants accommodated to or challenged the reality of migration and transnational lives? It will include a wide variety of migrant experiences, such as labor migrations, migrations in imperial and post-colonial spaces, family migration, and displaced peoples and refugees.

LALC 490 Lat Am/Latino/Carib St SR Rsch
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.