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Faculty Profile

Marcelo Borges

Professor of History; Boyd Lee Spahr Chair in the History of the Americas (1997)

Contact Information

borges@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 111
717.245.1186
https://blogs.dickinson.edu/borges/

Bio

Marcelo Borges teaches Latin American history and migration history. His current research focuses on the history of migration, epistolary practices in context of migration, and the history of emotions. His publications include Chains of Gold: Portuguese Migration to Argentina in Transatlantic Perspective (2009), Migrant Letters: Emotional Language, Mobile Identities, and Writing Practices in Historical Perspective (with Sonia Cancian, 2018), and Emotional Landscapes: Love, Gender, and Migration (with Sonia Cancian and Linda Reeder, 2021). He has been a visiting researcher at the Social Science Institute of the University of Lisbon, and a research fellow at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences and the Nantes Institute of Advanced Studies.

Education

  • Licenciado en Historia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1988
  • Profesor en Historia, 1988
  • Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1997

2022-2023 Academic Year

Fall 2022

HIST 130 Early Lat Am History to 1800
Cross-listed with LALC 230-01. Survey of pre-Colombian and colonial Latin American history. Students explore the major ancient civilizations of the Americas, the background and characteristics of European conquest and colonization, the formation of diverse colonial societies, and the breakdown of the colonial system that led to independence. The course includes both the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas from a comparative perspective. This course is cross-listed as LALC 230.

AFST 170 African Civilizations to 1850
Cross-listed with HIST 170-01. This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as HIST 170.

HIST 170 African Civilizations to 1850
Cross-listed with AFST 170-01. This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as AFST 170.

HIST 215 Mediterranean Migrations
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-01.Part of the Mediterranean Migrations Mosaic but open to all students. This course will focus on the development of migratory flows between Sub-Saharan and northern Africa and southern Europe in the context of trans-Mediterranean migration history. In addition, the course will place migration from Africa within the larger historical contacts between Europe and northern Africa—including colonialism and its aftermath—and it will consider the impact of larger socioeconomic and political changes on geographic mobility across the Mediterranean. The place of Spain and its migratory connections with Africa within the broader context of the European Union’s approaches to mobility will also be considered. The course will address the interplay of structural socioeconomic and political factors with individual trajectories of migrant men and women, and the impact they have on families and communities. FLIC option: Spanish

HIST 215 Research Methods
Cross-listed with SOCI 313-01.Permission of Instructor RequiredPart of the Mediterranean Migrations Mosaic.Enrollment limit of 12 “Research Methods: Comparative Migrations” can also fulfill the required Sociology Qualitative Research Methods Course for the major (SOCI 240). The course will focus on qualitative research methods used to study migration flows and journeys from sending to host communities. It will introduce students to ethnographic and socio-historical research methods including oral history interviewing, mapping, demographic, and archival research. We will focus on migration from sub-Saharan and Northern Africa to Southern Europe, with a specific emphasis on Spain and the Andalusian region. Examination of demographic and SES data, using data bases such as Eurobarometer, OECD and the Migration Policy Institute will be used for analysis as well as previous oral histories conducted by Dickinson students during the 1st Mediterranean Migration Mosaic in Malaga. Students will then develop their own research plan with interview questions for individual and community/organizational oral histories that are to be conducted in January. We will finish the course in Malaga with final projects due by the end of January 2023. With this course, students will be actively engaged in all phases of the research process from research design to data collection, analysis, and presentation. Required for and only open to Mosaic students.

AFST 220 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Cross-listed with HIST 274-01. Selected topics in Africana Studies at the intermediate level. The subject matter will vary from year to year dependent upon the interests of core and contributing Africana Studies faculty as well as the needs and interests of students. Topics may include the Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, Major African American Writers, Caribbean Diasporic Identities, among others. Prerequisite dependent upon topic.

LALC 230 Early Lat Am History to 1800
Cross-listed with HIST 130-01. Survey of pre-Colombian and colonial Latin American history. Students explore the major ancient civilizations of the Americas, the background and characteristics of European conquest and colonization, the formation of diverse colonial societies, and the breakdown of the colonial system that led to independence. The course includes both the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas from a comparative perspective. This course is cross-listed as HIST 130.

SOCI 230 Mediterranean Migrations
Cross-listed with HIST 215-01.Part of the Mediterranean Migrations Mosaic but open to all students. This course will focus on the development of migratory flows between Sub-Saharan and northern Africa and southern Europe in the context of trans-Mediterranean migration history. In addition, the course will place migration from Africa within the larger historical contacts between Europe and northern Africa—including colonialism and its aftermath—and it will consider the impact of larger socioeconomic and political changes on geographic mobility across the Mediterranean. The place of Spain and its migratory connections with Africa within the broader context of the European Union’s approaches to mobility will also be considered. The course will address the interplay of structural socioeconomic and political factors with individual trajectories of migrant men and women, and the impact they have on families and communities. FLIC option: Spanish

HIST 274 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05. The peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa in the early 1990s was widely hailed as the "South African Miracle." This course asks why such a transition should be considered miraculous. In order to answer our question, we will begin with South African independence from Britain in 1910 and study the evolution of legalized segregation and the introduction in 1948 of apartheid. After reviewing opposition movements we will move to a discussion of the demise of apartheid and the negotiated political order that took its place. We will examine the machinery and the deliberations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and debate its accomplishments. The course ends with an examination of memory and history.

HIST 283 Latin American-U.S. Relations
Cross-listed with LALC 283-01.

LALC 283 Latin American-U.S. Relations
Cross-listed with HIST 283-01.

HIST 298 Lat American Migrations in US
Cross-listed with LALC 298-01. This course examines the history of Latin American and Spanish-speaking Caribbean immigration to the United States from the late nineteenth century to the turn of the twenty-first century from a comparative perspective. The first half of the course will look at a variety of immigrant groups from Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Some groups will be discussed more in-depth and in comparative perspective as examples of distinctive historical trajectories and immigration experiences—from labor migration, to exile, to internal migrants in neocolonial contexts. We will discuss such key topics as rural and urban experiences, the role of transnational networks, the making of the “illegal” or undocumented immigrant, economic and sociocultural adaptation, youth cultures, activism and resistance, different forms of diversity within immigrant groups, and the changing perceptions about and reception of Latin American and Caribbean immigrants and their descendants in the United States.Cross-listed as LALC 298.

LALC 298 Lat American Migrations in US
Cross-listed with HIST 298-01. This course examines the history of Latin American and Spanish-speaking Caribbean immigration to the United States from the late nineteenth century to the turn of the twenty-first century from a comparative perspective. The first half of the course will look at a variety of immigrant groups from Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Some groups will be discussed more in-depth and in comparative perspective as examples of distinctive historical trajectories and immigration experiences—from labor migration, to exile, to internal migrants in neocolonial contexts. We will discuss such key topics as rural and urban experiences, the role of transnational networks, the making of the “illegal” or undocumented immigrant, economic and sociocultural adaptation, youth cultures, activism and resistance, different forms of diversity within immigrant groups, and the changing perceptions about and reception of Latin American and Caribbean immigrants and their descendants in the United States.Cross-listed as HIST 298.

SOCI 313 Research Methods
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02.Permission of Instructor Required.Part of the Mediterranean Migrations Mosaic.Enrollment limit of 12 “Research Methods: Comparative Migrations” can also fulfill the required Sociology Qualitative Research Methods Course for the major (SOCI 240). The course will focus on qualitative research methods used to study migration flows and journeys from sending to host communities. It will introduce students to ethnographic and socio-historical research methods including oral history interviewing, mapping, demographic, and archival research. We will focus on migration from sub-Saharan and Northern Africa to Southern Europe, with a specific emphasis on Spain and the Andalusian region. Examination of demographic and SES data, using data bases such as Eurobarometer, OECD and the Migration Policy Institute will be used for analysis as well as previous oral histories conducted by Dickinson students during the 1st Mediterranean Migration Mosaic in Malaga. Students will then develop their own research plan with interview questions for individual and community/organizational oral histories that are to be conducted in January. We will finish the course in Malaga with final projects due by the end of January 2023. With this course, students will be actively engaged in all phases of the research process from research design to data collection, analysis, and presentation. Required for and only open to Mosaic students.