Faculty Profile

Elise Bartosik-VĂ©lez

Associate Professor of Spanish (2003)

Contact Information

bartosie@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 320
717.245.1844

Bio

Professor Bartosik-Vélez received her Ph.D. in comparative literature from the University of Illinois. She teaches Latin American literature and focuses in particular on the colonial period and the nineteenth century. Her research interests include: Christopher Columbus, the legacy of the classical world in the Americas, intellectual history, and the colonial and independence era in both Latin America and the United States.

Education

  • B.A., University of California at San Diego, 1987
  • Masters in Pacific International Affairs, University of California at San Diego, 1990
  • M.A., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997
  • Ph.D., 2003

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

SPAN 202 Advanced Grammar
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' formal knowledge of Spanish by reviewing and studying the more challenging grammatical structures. The course will also work on development of skills in reading, oral expression, and vocabulary development. The purpose of the course is to equip students with the formal grammatical background necessary to be successful in courses on Hispanic literatures, linguistics and cultures. Prerequisite: 201, 120, or the equivalent.

SPAN 202 Advanced Grammar
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' formal knowledge of Spanish by reviewing and studying the more challenging grammatical structures. The course will also work on development of skills in reading, oral expression, and vocabulary development. The purpose of the course is to equip students with the formal grammatical background necessary to be successful in courses on Hispanic literatures, linguistics and cultures. Prerequisite: 201, 120, or the equivalent.

LALC 300 Routes thru the Early Americas
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01 and ENGL 370-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar's Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turner’s thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. We’ll be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally ‘literary’ works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms “American” and the “Americas.” Taught in English.

ENGL 370 Routes thru the Early Americas
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01 and SPAN 380-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar's Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turner’s thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. We’ll be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally ‘literary’ works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms “American” and the “Americas.” Taught in English.

SPAN 380 Routes thru the Early Americas
Cross-listed with ENGL 370-01 and LALC 300-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar's Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turner’s thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. We’ll be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally ‘literary’ works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms “American” and the “Americas.” Taught in English.