Faculty Profile

Jeremy Ball

Associate Professor of History (2005), Department Chair

Contact Information

ballj@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 19
717.245.2548191
http://users.dickinson.edu/~ballj/index.html

Bio

He teaches courses in African political and ecological history, apartheid, the Atlantic slave trade, and human rights. His research focuses on the labor and business history of Angola, Portuguese colonialism, and oral history.

Education

  • B.A., Boston College, 1994
  • M.A., Yale University, 1998
  • Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2003

2013-2014 Academic Year

Fall 2013

HIST 215 Cold War in Southern Africa
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. By the mid-1960s the only remaining African countries governed by colonial rulers and/or resident white minorities were in Southern Africa. This course examines the Cold War calculations of the superpowers in the region and explores why white supremacy and colonialism had such staying power in Southern Africa. After an examination of Cold War history and an assessment of Southern Africa’s historical development, we will focus on case studies: The Congo, the Portuguese colonies of Angola and Mozambique, Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, and South Africa. The course ends in 1990 with the release from prison of Nelson Mandela and the negotiated end of apartheid in South Africa.

AFST 220 Cold War in Southern Africa
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02. By the mid-1960s the only remaining African countries governed by colonial rulers and/or resident white minorities were in Southern Africa. This course examines the Cold War calculations of the superpowers in the region and explores why white supremacy and colonialism had such staying power in Southern Africa. After an examination of Cold War history and an assessment of Southern Africa’s historical development, we will focus on case studies: The Congo, the Portuguese colonies of Angola and Mozambique, Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, and South Africa. The course ends in 1990 with the release from prison of Nelson Mandela and the negotiated end of apartheid in South Africa.

AFST 220 Atlantic Slave Trade 1450-1850
Cross-listed with HIST 272-01 and LALC 272-01. Part of the Atlantaic Slave Trade Mosaic. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic, an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world.

HIST 272 Atlantic Slave Trade 1450-1850
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and LALC 272-01. Part of the Atlantic Slave Trade Mosaic. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic, an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world.

LALC 272 Atlantic Slave Trade 1450-1850
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and HIST 272-01. Part of the Atlantic Slave Trade Mosaic. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic, an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world.

Spring 2014

AFST 100 Intro to Africana Studies
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01.

LALC 121 Intro to Africana Studies
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01.

AFST 220 Afr Hist/Earliest Times-C.1850
Cross-listed with HIST 270-01. “Africa lies at the heart of human history. It is the continent from which the distant ancestors of every one of us, no matter who we are today, originally came. Its peoples participated integrally in the great transformations of world history, from the first rise of agricultural ways of life to the various inventions of metal working to the growth and spread of global networks of commerce.” Africans were vital participants and contributors to human developments in all ages. This is the story we will introduce you to in this course. The central themes of the class will be how people in Africa mastered and used the environments in which they lived, how they organized their societies in different periods and places, and how they changed and developed in the face of shifting historical circumstances. We will explore the ancient historical roots of the great cultural diversity of the continent. Among the topics and themes of history we will consider as we progress forward in time toward the eighteenth century will be agricultural developments, technology, social change, political growth of scale, urbanization, trade and commerce, religion, art and music.

AFST 220 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Cross-listed with HIST 274-01. The peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa in the early 1990s was widely hailed the “South African Miracle.” This course asks why such a transition should be considered miraculous. In order to answer our question, we will begin with South African independence from Britain in 1910 and study the evolution of legalized segregation and the introduction in 1948 of apartheid. After reviewing opposition movements we will move to a discussion of the demise of apartheid and the negotiated political order that took its place. We will examine the machinery and the deliberations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and debate its accomplishments. The course ends with an examination of memory and history. This story, and the individual stories of thousands of South Africans, will explain why today South Africa is in the words of Irish poet Seamus Heaney “a place where hope and history rhyme.”

HIST 270 Afr Hist/Earliest Times-c.1850
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05. “Africa lies at the heart of human history. It is the continent from which the distant ancestors of every one of us, no matter who we are today, originally came. Its peoples participated integrally in the great transformations of world history, from the first rise of agricultural ways of life to the various inventions of metal working to the growth and spread of global networks of commerce.” Africans were vital participants and contributors to human developments in all ages. This is the story we will introduce you to in this course. The central themes of the class will be how people in Africa mastered and used the environments in which they lived, how they organized their societies in different periods and places, and how they changed and developed in the face of shifting historical circumstances. We will explore the ancient historical roots of the great cultural diversity of the continent. Among the topics and themes of history we will consider as we progress forward in time toward the eighteenth century will be agricultural developments, technology, social change, political growth of scale, urbanization, trade and commerce, religion, art and music.

HIST 274 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06. The peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa in the early 1990s was widely hailed the “South African Miracle.” This course asks why such a transition should be considered miraculous. In order to answer our question, we will begin with South African independence from Britain in 1910 and study the evolution of legalized segregation and the introduction in 1948 of apartheid. After reviewing opposition movements we will move to a discussion of the demise of apartheid and the negotiated political order that took its place. We will examine the machinery and the deliberations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and debate its accomplishments. The course ends with an examination of memory and history. This story, and the individual stories of thousands of South Africans, will explain why today South Africa is in the words of Irish poet Seamus Heaney “a place where hope and history rhyme.”