Faculty Profile

Jeremy Ball

Associate Professor of History (2005)

Contact Information

ballj@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 109
717.254.8191

Bio

He teaches courses in African political and ecological history, apartheid, the Atlantic slave trade, and human rights. His research focuses on the labor and business history of Angola, Portuguese colonialism, and oral history.

Education

  • B.A., Boston College, 1994
  • M.A., Yale University, 1998
  • Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2003

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

AFST 170 African Civilizations to 1850
Cross-listed with HIST 170-01.

HIST 170 African Civilizations to 1850
Cross-listed with AFST 170-01.

AFST 220 Atlantic Slave Trade 1450-1850
Cross-listed with HIST 272-01 and LALC 272-01. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world.

LALC 272 Atlantic Slave Trade 1450-1850
Cross-listed with HIST 272-01 and AFST 220-02.

HIST 272 Atlantic Slave Trade 1450-1850
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02 and LALC 272-01.

Spring 2019

HIST 215 After Genocide and Apartheid
Cross-listed with AFST 220-07, RELG 260-03 and SOCI 230-01.Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic. This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.

AFST 220 After Genocide and Apartheid
Cross-listed with HIST 215-03, RELG 260-03 and SOCI 230-01.Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic. This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.

SOCI 230 After Genocide and Apartheid
Cross-listed with HIST 215-03, RELG 260-03 and AFST 220-07.Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic. This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.

RELG 260 After Genocide and Apartheid
Cross-listed with HIST 215-03, AFST 220-07 and SOCI 230-01.Part of the Rwanda Mini-Mosaic.This course examines how two societies–Rwanda after the 1994 genocide and South Africa after the end of apartheid–uncovered the atrocities of the past, delivered justice to perpetrators, and engendered reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. After learning about the histories of these two societies, we will study institutions–the International Criminal Court for Rwanda (ICTR), Gacaca, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Finally, we will consider how these two societies commemorate and memorialize victims. Our course will culminate in an optional, two-week Mosaic in Rwanda. In Rwanda, we will meet with genocide survivors and perpetrators and think deeply about how to engender reconciliation in a post-genocide society.

HIST 404 Nationalism
What is nationalism? Is there something innate about the nation, or is it an idea constructed by politicians? What is the role of culture? And what about the rise of the subnational-the claims of local, regional, and ethnic minorities? This seminar will examine theory and case studies, including the French, Palestinian, and Zulu examples, to reach a conclusion.