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Faculty Profile

Jeremy Ball

Associate Professor of History (2005)

Contact Information

ballj@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 109
717.254.8191

Bio

He teaches courses in African political and ecological history, apartheid, the Atlantic slave trade, and human rights. His research focuses on the labor and business history of Angola, Portuguese colonialism, and oral history.

Education

  • B.A., Boston College, 1994
  • M.A., Yale University, 1998
  • Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2003

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

AFST 171 African History since 1800
Cross-listed with HIST 171-01.

HIST 171 African History since 1800
Cross-listed with AFST 171-01.

HIST 205 Public History
Public history explores the ways history is put to work in the world. Public historians–who work in a range of institutions–share a commitment to making history relevant and useful in the public sphere beyond the walls of the traditional classroom. Sites of public history include educational spaces, archives, and, at times, contested places: battlefields, museums, documentaries, historical societies, national and state parks, local oral history projects, and sites of historic preservation. Public history is firmly rooted in the methods of the discipline of history, but with an added emphasis on the skills and perspectives useful in public history practice and on the ethics of listening to multiple publics. The term “public history” emerged in the 1970s in the United States with an emphasis on ideals of social justice, political activism, and community engagement. In other parts of the world, public history is often known as “Heritage Studies”. In this course, students will learn about the evolution of the field of public history, discuss best practices and practical challenges within the field, and will culminate the learning process through work on a public history project in conjunction with the Cumberland County Historical Society.

WGSS 302 African Women's History
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and HIST 374-01. This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa.

AFST 320 African Women's History
Cross-listed with HIST 374-01 and WGSS 302-02. This course examines the role of women in African societies since the nineteenth century. Lectures and readings will be arranged thematically. Themes include sexuality and reproduction, the household, women's economic activity, political power, religion, colonialism, and democracy. After a discussion of gender, we will analyze pre-colonial production and reproduction, family life and religion in the twentieth century, women's roles in nationalist politics, the politics of female genital mutilation, and the lives of two contemporary African women leaders. Readings, including historical studies and novels, songs, and art, will be drawn from across the cultures and languages of Africa.

HIST 374 African Women's History
Cross-listed with WGSS 302-02 and AFST 320-02.