Faculty Profile

Shamma Alam

Assistant Professor of International Studies (2014)

Contact Information

alams@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 115
717.254.8167
http://users.dickinson.edu/~alams/

Bio

Shamma Alam received his Ph.D. in Economics in June 2014 from University of Washington – Seattle. He received his B.A in Economics from Franklin & Marshall College, and M.A. in Economics from University of Washington. His research interests are in Development, Health, and Population Economics with focuses on Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. In the past, he has worked for the development organizations Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Bank.

Education

  • B.A., Franklin & Marshall College, 2009
  • M.A., University of Washington-Seattle, 2011
  • Ph.D., 2014

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

ECON 214 Global Health
Cross-listed with INST 290-01.The course will focus on the current major health problems with a particular emphasis on developing countries. HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrheal disease are the four biggest contributors to the global burden of disease, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and represent a serious constraint on economic growth. They kill nearly 4 million African adults and children annually. Through readings and lectures from the public health, economics and medical literature, we will focus on the causes behind the prevalence of the diseases in certain regions and the debates surrounding effectiveness of policy interventions to combat these diseases. More specifically, we will try to understand some of the key policy challenges to fight the diseases in the developing world. Additionally, the course will also look into historical cases of major diseases and epidemics around the world.

INST 290 Global Health
Cross-listed with ECON 214-02.The course will focus on the current major health problems with a particular emphasis on developing countries. HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrheal disease are the four biggest contributors to the global burden of disease, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and represent a serious constraint on economic growth. They kill nearly 4 million African adults and children annually. Through readings and lectures from the public health, economics and medical literature, we will focus on the causes behind the prevalence of the diseases in certain regions and the debates surrounding effectiveness of policy interventions to combat these diseases. More specifically, we will try to understand some of the key policy challenges to fight the diseases in the developing world. Additionally, the course will also look into historical cases of major diseases and epidemics around the world.

INST 401 Poverty & Globalization
Two kinds of economic phenomena have dominated the world over the last few decades: Increasing globalization and increasing efforts to fight poverty. In this course, we will try to understand the results of both these phenomena. Thus, the class will be divided into two segments: one segment will focus on poverty and the other segment on globalization. The segment on poverty will try to understand the answers to the following questions: Why do we have still have poverty? Why did some of the approaches by international organizations and different governments to fight poverty fail miserably? And looking ahead, how can we solve this problem and how are we trying to solve the problem now? The segment on globalization will try to understand the following issues: Is globalization good for us? Why are many people unhappy with globalization? With globalization why are we seeing growing inequality in the developed world? Does globalization make it more difficult to fight international terrorism? Is the developed world moving in the right direction to fight global terrorism?

Spring 2017

INBM 200 Global Economy
Cross-listed with INST 200-01.

INST 200 Global Economy
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02.

INBM 200 Global Economy
Cross-listed with INST 200-02.

INST 200 Global Economy
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01.

ECON 214 International Development
Cross-listed with INST 290-01. This course will cover the main topics that are covered in traditional development classes, which include agricultural/subsistence household issues, credit constraints in poor country settings, issues related to education, child labor, migration, population, and health, and also potential development and sustainability problems that we are going to face because of climate change.

INST 290 International Development
Cross-listed with ECON 214-01. This course will cover the main topics that are covered in traditional development classes, which include agricultural/subsistence household issues, credit constraints in poor country settings, issues related to education, child labor, migration, population, and health, and also potential development and sustainability problems that we are going to face because of climate change.