Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 102-01 Gender and Popular Culture
Instructor: Jennifer Musial
Course Description:
Focusing on American popular culture, this course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to examine how social identities are shaped and reshaped through the concepts of hegemony, consumer culture, power, and audience agency. We will discuss cultural theory and test ways to apply this to popular culture. We will look at our consumption habits and the conditions of popular culture production. Finally, this course asks you to sharpen your critical media literacy skills culminating in a creative project to "speak back" to popular culture on your terms.
1500:MR   DENNY 211
WGST 200-01 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Instructor: Kathryn Oliviero
Course Description:
This is an interdisciplinary course, integrating literature, economics, sociology, psychology, history, anthropology, and geography. This course will focus on historical and contemporary representations of women. It will also examine the varied experiences of women, with attention to the gendered dynamics of family, work, sexuality, race, religion, socioeconomic class, labor, and feminism. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and US Diversity graduation requirement.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
WGST 201-01 Philosophy of Race & Gender
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-02.
1230:MWF   EASTC 300
WGST 202-01 Reproductive Justice
Instructor: Jennifer Musial
Course Description:
Hobby Lobby, Debra Harrell, Remote-Control Contraception Chip, Marissa Alexander, Staten Island Hospital Forced C-Section These represent a sliver of reproductive justice cases making news in 2014. Reproductive justice refers to the possibility for people to have economic, social, and political power to determine what happens in their intimate and procreative lives. Beyond an individualistic framework, reproductive justice recognizes the need to sustain families and communities too. In this course, you will learn about the three principles of reproductive justice: 1/ support to terminate or prevent pregnancies; 2/ support to be pregnant and give birth in self-determined ways; and, 3/ support to keep families together and to parent without fear of child removal. You will learn why the pro-choice paradigm is too limiting for scholars and activists as well as why a reproductive justice movement must centralize racism, poverty, and colonialism in its agenda. This course asks you to pay attention to cases of reproductive injustice, particularly as they are reported via social media through use of hashtags like #reprojustice, #reprorights, #reprohealth.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
WGST 202-02 Introduction to Sexuality Studies
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
This course will explore how sexual representations, identities, and behaviors shape and are shaped by political, cultural, social, religious, and economic practices of societies across time and space. We will approach these questions by analyzing a variety of cultural texts that address sexuality, desire, and erotic expression. The course is designed to expose you to core concepts, methods of analysis, and critical debates in sexuality studies that convey the interdisciplinary character of the field.
1030:MWF   STERN 103
WGST 300-01 Gender, Migrations & Feminisms
Instructor: Kathryn Oliviero
Course Description:
Why do global controversies over immigration so often center on migrant womens fertility and their childrens access to education and medical care? Why do some countries accept LGBT migrants but forbid gay and lesbians from adopting children or using artificial insemination? How is marriage used in immigration procedures to shape racial and ethnic diversity? What are the gendered implications when nurses and careworkers are a countrys central export? This course examines how intersecting gender, sexual and ethnic hierarchies shape and are shaped by immigration. Applying insights from feminist theories of migration, students will explore how the gendered processes surrounding immigration craft concepts of nation, borders and citizenship. Readings and films examine how sexual and ethnic norms are renegotiated through the selection and regulation of immigrants. Central to our investigation is how transnational and economic forces compel migration, reshaping understandings of national belonging, workplaces, and family in the process. We will particularly consider how migrants negotiate multiple marginalizations, and in turn refashion understandings of community, identities, culture, and politics. An interdisciplinary framework combines media, law, activist, film, literary and historical accounts.
1030:TR   DENNY 315
WGST 300-02 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and LALC 300-03. Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319
WGST 300-03 Victorian Sexualities
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 360-01.Often the Victorian era (1832-1901) is depicted as a period rigid in its attitudes toward morality, gender, and sexuality. However, nineteenth-century literature saw an array of dangerous people inhabit its pages: effeminate men, political women (also known as the New Woman), prostitutes, and hysterics to name a few. Victorians lived during a time of new emphasis on democracy and equality, scrutiny of marriage and property law, and, at times, openness to diversity in gender and sexuality. While our course will pay special attention to changing conceptions of the individual, sexuality, and gender, we also will look at the ways in which gender and sexuality intersect with race, class, nationality, and other social factors. This course is an upper-level seminar in Victorian literature of many genrespoetry, drama, the novel, and non-fiction prose by a variety of authors such as Lord Alfred Tennyson, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Meredith, Charles Dickens, Sigmund Freud, Michael Field, and Mona Caird.
0930:MWF   EASTC 301
WGST 300-04 Oral History: Gay Lesbian
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler, Lonna Malmsheimer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 313-01.This course is focused on collecting and recording the individual life stories of LGBT people in central Pennsylvania during the latter half of the twentieth and the first years of the twenty-first centuries. Life for LGBT Americans has changed substantially over the past 50 years. As recently as the 1960s, gay citizens could be and were arrested, incarcerated, and hospitalized (against their will) as either sick, sinful or criminal. Gays and lesbians were widely seen as a threat to the family, religion and law to the American way of life. This social hatred and fear drove LGBT individuals to suppress their desires and hide their orientation. With the sexual revolution of the sixties and seventies, related movements for both womens and gay liberation developed. LGBT people came out and sought to change not only this ideology, but also the laws and structures that institutionally enforced sexual and gender conformity. In this course, students will be trained in oral history methods and will collect the stories of LGBT residents in our area. These interviews will contribute to the developing archival project that is sponsored by the Central Pennsylvania LGBT Center (www.centralpalgbtcenter/lgbt-history-project) and the Dickinson College Archives. In addition to collecting oral histories, students will transcribe their interviews and share their findings in research papers and class presentations. Please note that in addition to scheduled course meetings, students will schedule and conduct off-campus interviews with residents of central Pennsylvania.
1330:TR   DENNY 304
WGST 300-05 Love or Marriage in the French Novel Written by Women from Princess of Cleves to the Vagabond
Instructor: Catherine Beaudry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 363-01.Taught in French.
1330:W   LIBRY ALDEN
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 220-02 Sex and the City: Gender, Politics, and Culture in 20th Century Urban America
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-02. In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which the gendered city reflects complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
AFST 220-03 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-01 and AMST 200-03. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, we will analyze key people, issues, events and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-03 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and HIST 211-01. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, we will analyze key people, issues, events and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-03 Jane Austen and Her World
Instructor: Leah Orr
Course Description:
In this course we will explore the literature, life, and times of Jane Austen. Our focal point will be her novels, but we will also read selections from her letters and literature from her contemporaries in the early nineteenth century. We will look at how her reputation has changed over time and the ways her works have been interpreted, continued, and reimagined in scholarship, literature, and film.
0830:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 212-02 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-02. Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
0900:TR   EASTC 406
ENGL 360-01 Victorian Sexualities
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-03.Often the Victorian era (1832-1901) is depicted as a period rigid in its attitudes toward morality, gender, and sexuality. However, nineteenth-century literature saw an array of dangerous people inhabit its pages: effeminate men, political women (also known as the New Woman), prostitutes, and hysterics to name a few. Victorians lived during a time of new emphasis on democracy and equality, scrutiny of marriage and property law, and, at times, openness to diversity in gender and sexuality. While our course will pay special attention to changing conceptions of the individual, sexuality, and gender, we also will look at the ways in which gender and sexuality intersect with race, class, nationality, and other social factors. This course is an upper-level seminar in Victorian literature of many genrespoetry, drama, the novel, and non-fiction prose by a variety of authors such as Lord Alfred Tennyson, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Meredith, Charles Dickens, Sigmund Freud, Michael Field, and Mona Caird.
0930:MWF   EASTC 301
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 362-01 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-03 and WGST 300-02. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319
FREN 363-01 Love or Marriage in the French Novel Written by Women from Princess of Cleves to the Vagabond
Instructor: Catherine Beaudry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-05.
1330:W   LIBRY ALDEN
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-01 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and AMST 200-03. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, we will analyze key people, issues, events and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
HIST 211-02 Sex and the City: Gender, Politics, and Culture in 20th Century Urban America
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which the gendered city reflects complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 216-01 Kabbalah
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 260-01.
0900:TR   EASTC 107
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 300-03 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and WGST 300-02.Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 261-02 Philosophy of Race & Gender
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 201-01.
1230:MWF   EASTC 300
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 145-01 Psychology of Human Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
This course is a study of human sexuality emphasizing psychological aspects. We will cover sexual development from childhood to adulthood, sexual orientations, biological influences, sexual attitudes and behavior, gender, sex therapy, sexual coercion and abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual health, and the development of sexual relationships. The study of human sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary in nature (drawing from such varied disciplines as sociology, women's studies, biology, anthropology, history, and others). Although we will cover some material from these disciplines, we will take an explicitly social psychological perspective, focusing on individual, personal, and social aspects of sexual behaviors, attitudes and beliefs.
0900:TR   KAUF 179
PSYC 335-01 Research Methods in Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
This course addresses the methodological principles underlying empirical psychological research on gender and sexuality. We will specifically consider qualitative methods as they are used within psychology. Because the study of gender in particular has been strongly guided by feminist theory, this course will focus on feminist epistemologies as related to social psychological research. Class and lab time will be spent developing the following skills: critical reading and analysis of published research, design of empirical research, data collection, and qualitative data analysis. This course will culminate in the design and implementation of an original research project in the area of psychology of gender or human sexuality. Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 201 and 202, and either 135 or 145.
1030:TR   KAUF 185
1330:F   KAUF 185
1330:F   KAUF 186
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 260-01 Kabbalah
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 216-01.
0900:TR   EASTC 107
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 313-01 Oral History: Gay Lesbian
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler, Lonna Malmsheimer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-04.This course is focused on collecting and recording the individual life stories of LGBT people in central Pennsylvania during the latter half of the twentieth and the first years of the twenty-first centuries. Life for LGBT Americans has changed substantially over the past 50 years. As recently as the 1960s, gay citizens could be and were arrested, incarcerated, and hospitalized (against their will) as either sick, sinful or criminal. Gays and lesbians were widely seen as a threat to the family, religion and law to the American way of life. This social hatred and fear drove LGBT individuals to suppress their desires and hide their orientation. With the sexual revolution of the sixties and seventies, related movements for both womens and gay liberation developed. LGBT people came out and sought to change not only this ideology, but also the laws and structures that institutionally enforced sexual and gender conformity. In this course, students will be trained in oral history methods and will collect the stories of LGBT residents in our area. These interviews will contribute to the developing archival project that is sponsored by the Central Pennsylvania LGBT Center (www.centralpalgbtcenter/lgbt-history-project) and the Dickinson College Archives. In addition to collecting oral histories, students will transcribe their interviews and share their findings in research papers and class presentations. Please note that in addition to scheduled course meetings, students will schedule and conduct off-campus interviews with residents of central Pennsylvania.
1330:TR   DENNY 304
Courses Offered in WRPG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WRPG 211-02 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 212-02. Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
0900:TR   EASTC 406