Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 135-01.
1330:TF   KAUF 179
WGST 200-01 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Instructor: Jennifer Musial
Course Description:
This is an interdisciplinary course, integrating literature, economics, sociology, psychology, history, anthropology, and geography. This course will focus on historical and contemporary representations of women. It will also examine the varied experiences of women, with attention to the gendered dynamics of family, work, sexuality, race, religion, socioeconomic class, labor, and feminism. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and US Diversity graduation requirement.
0930:MWF   DENNY 212
WGST 200-02 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Instructor: Jennifer Musial
Course Description:
This is an interdisciplinary course, integrating literature, economics, sociology, psychology, history, anthropology, and geography. This course will focus on historical and contemporary representations of women. It will also examine the varied experiences of women, with attention to the gendered dynamics of family, work, sexuality, race, religion, socioeconomic class, labor, and feminism. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and US Diversity graduation requirement.
1030:MWF   DENNY 212
WGST 201-01 Gender & Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 205-01. With the rise of industrialization and the growth of the nation's cities, social patterns in American life underwent dramatic change. Between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth, shifts in gender identity influenced ideas about bachelorhood, the nature of dating, the meaning of family and the definition of marriage. New notions of sexuality also transformed heterosexual and homosexual experiences. Art from the period reflects and helped shape these changes. The course considers how artists in America respond to marriage, sexual practice and gender roles through the production of painting, photography and sculpture.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 08
WGST 202-01 Black Feminist Thoughts
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03, AMST 200-03 and LALC 200-01. This course provides perspectives on the development and materialization of Black feminist thoughts within historical, social, political, and cultural contexts. Interdisciplinary in focus, it surveys feminist politics and theories through films, popular culture, manifestoes, literary texts, and theoretical and historical essays. It offers an interdisciplinary survey of African-American and other African descendant womens contributions to feminist theory as a heterogeneous field of knowledge encompassing multiple streams of gender- and race-cognizant articulation and praxis. This course will pair primary texts authored by black women with secondary text produced by black feminist scholars; these critiques will illustrate the myriad ways black feminists engage with and seek to transform representations of black female experience. During the course, we will identify and characterize the major issues that black feminists address as well as the various contemporary forms of resistance to social structures. In addition, the course will explore the diversity and ambiguity of various black feminisms through a number of frames, such as gender theory, critical race theory, queer theory, and reproductive rights and practices. Caribbean, Afro-Latina, and Black British feminisms are also included as we map feminist consciousness and practice across the African Diaspora.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
WGST 202-02 Gender in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05 and ANTH 245-01. This course introduces students to perspectives on and experiences of gender in Africa today and in the recent past using an ethnographic lens. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and films, we will consider the diverse ways people have constructed gender in their everyday lives in different parts of Africa; how people have shaped gendered knowledge and identities in cultural, social, historical, and political-economic contexts; and how matters of gender have been represented in scholarship, popular media, activism, and policy realms. A central concern of ours will be with gender in peoples practical, everyday lives: how gender is crucial to understanding politics, economics, development, social life, popular culture, and other aspects of peoples lives in Africa. A consistent theme in our diverse readings is the changing terrain of gender relations in the contexts of Africas long-term entanglements with global forces, particularly those of recent decades.
1330:MR   DENNY 204
WGST 250-01 Methods in Women's and Gender Studies
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee, Kathryn Oliviero
Course Description:
This course will provide an intensive workshop introducing students to a range of methods and theories drawn from different disciplines for the study of gender and women's lives. Students will return to these methods and theories in greater depth in 400. Prerequisite (or corequisite): 200. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.
0900:TR   DENNY 204
WGST 278-01 European Women's History
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 278-01.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
WGST 300-01 Gender and Health
Instructor: Jennifer Musial
Course Description:
Biomedical. Social. Cultural. Psychological. Corporeal. Which of these define gendered health? This course explores how health and illness are constructed through individual experiences, socio-cultural institutions, and systemic factors. Using an intersectional approach attentive to sexuality, class, racialization, ableism, and colonialism, this course asks you to consider how gendered norms influence our understanding of health, illness, and self-care; we also interrogate how/why marginalized populations are targets for health intervention, and to what degree resistance is possible. Course topics include health governmentality, psychological, physical and invisible dis/abilites, the language of pain, the breast cancer industry, state intervention, family planning, colonial public health, food deserts, and consumption practices alongside alternative healing modalities like Yoga, Acupuncture, Meditation, Reiki, and so on. You will develop an original, well-researched essay over the course of the semester.
1500:MR   DENNY 110
WGST 300-02 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and ENGL 396-01. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical approaches as psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, and new historicism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
WGST 300-03 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 327-01. Exploring the interactions between religious and gender and sexuality, this course examines: how various religious traditions perceive sexuality and gender; the ways in which religion influences social policy both within the United States and globally; and the impact this has on individuals, families, and societies. The course focuses on contemporary concerns, while offering a comparative (historical and cross-cultural) introduction to these issues across several religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to religious fundamentalisms across the three major monotheistic religions:Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.
1030:TF   DENNY 110
WGST 305-01 Gender and Sexual Identities
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PSYC 435-01.
1500:TF   KAUF 187
WGST 400-01 Senior Seminar in Women's and Gender Studies
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee, Kathryn Oliviero
Course Description:
All topics will draw upon the knowledge of the history and theories of feminism and will be interdisciplinary in nature. Prerequisite: 200, or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   ALTHSE 07
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 220-03 Black Feminist Thoughts
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-03, LALC 200-01 and WGST 202-01. This course provides perspectives on the development and materialization of Black feminist thoughts within historical, social, political, and cultural contexts. Interdisciplinary in focus, it surveys feminist politics and theories through films, popular culture, manifestoes, literary texts, and theoretical and historical essays. It offers an interdisciplinary survey of African-American and other African descendant womens contributions to feminist theory as a heterogeneous field of knowledge encompassing multiple streams of gender- and race-cognizant articulation and praxis. This course will pair primary texts authored by black women with secondary text produced by black feminist scholars; these critiques will illustrate the myriad ways black feminists engage with and seek to transform representations of black female experience. During the course, we will identify and characterize the major issues that black feminists address as well as the various contemporary forms of resistance to social structures. In addition, the course will explore the diversity and ambiguity of various black feminisms through a number of frames, such as gender theory, critical race theory, queer theory, and reproductive rights and practices. Caribbean, Afro-Latina, and Black British feminisms are also included as we map feminist consciousness and practice across the African Diaspora.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
AFST 220-05 Gender in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01 and WGST 202-02. This course introduces students to perspectives on and experiences of gender in Africa today and in the recent past using an ethnographic lens. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and films, we will consider the diverse ways people have constructed gender in their everyday lives in different parts of Africa; how people have shaped gendered knowledge and identities in cultural, social, historical, and political-economic contexts; and how matters of gender have been represented in scholarship, popular media, activism, and policy realms. A central concern of ours will be with gender in peoples practical, everyday lives: how gender is crucial to understanding politics, economics, development, social life, popular culture, and other aspects of peoples lives in Africa. A consistent theme in our diverse readings is the changing terrain of gender relations in the contexts of Africas long-term entanglements with global forces, particularly those of recent decades.
1330:MR   DENNY 204
AFST 320-01 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 396-01 and WGST 300-02. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical approaches as psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, and new historicism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-03 Black Feminist Thoughts
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03, LALC 200-01 and WGST 202-01. This course provides perspectives on the development and materialization of Black feminist thoughts within historical, social, political, and cultural contexts. Interdisciplinary in focus, it surveys feminist politics and theories through films, popular culture, manifestoes, literary texts, and theoretical and historical essays. It offers an interdisciplinary survey of African-American and other African descendant womens contributions to feminist theory as a heterogeneous field of knowledge encompassing multiple streams of gender- and race-cognizant articulation and praxis. This course will pair primary texts authored by black women with secondary text produced by black feminist scholars; these critiques will illustrate the myriad ways black feminists engage with and seek to transform representations of black female experience. During the course, we will identify and characterize the major issues that black feminists address as well as the various contemporary forms of resistance to social structures. In addition, the course will explore the diversity and ambiguity of various black feminisms through a number of frames, such as gender theory, critical race theory, queer theory, and reproductive rights and practices. Caribbean, Afro-Latina, and Black British feminisms are also included as we map feminist consciousness and practice across the African Diaspora.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 245-01 Gender in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05 and WGST 202-02.This course introduces students to perspectives on and experiences of gender in Africa today and in the recent past using an ethnographic lens. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and films, we will consider the diverse ways people have constructed gender in their everyday lives in different parts of Africa; how people have shaped gendered knowledge and identities in cultural, social, historical, and political-economic contexts; and how matters of gender have been represented in scholarship, popular media, activism, and policy realms. A central concern of ours will be with gender in peoples practical, everyday lives: how gender is crucial to understanding politics, economics, development, social life, popular culture, and other aspects of peoples lives in Africa. A consistent theme in our diverse readings is the changing terrain of gender relations in the contexts of Africas long-term entanglements with global forces, particularly those of recent decades.
1330:MR   DENNY 204
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 205-01 Gender & Sexuality in Modern American Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 201-01. With the rise of industrialization and the growth of the nation's cities, social patterns in American life underwent dramatic change. Between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth, shifts in gender identity influenced ideas about bachelorhood, the nature of dating, the meaning of family and the definition of marriage. New notions of sexuality also transformed heterosexual and homosexual experiences. Art from the period reflects and helped shape these changes. The course considers how artists in America respond to marriage, sexual practice and gender roles through the production of painting, photography and sculpture.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 08
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 396-01 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and WGST 300-02. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical approaches as psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, and new historicism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in FLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FLST 210-04 Writing About Sexuality and Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-03. The primary goal of this writing intensive course is to develop students writing skills in Spanish. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work. The courses central aim is to help students in the development of ideas, creativity, organization, and basic research skills that shape strong academic writing. Throughout the semester students will broaden their lexicon and knowledge of Hispanic cultures through the critical analysis of film and literature. As we analyze various representations of sexuality, we will discuss what these expressions of pleasure and desire tell us about cultural practices, beliefs, values, and social institutions. In addition to readings, you will be asked to watch films outside of class.
1030:TR   BOSLER 313
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 278-01 European Women's History
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 278-01.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 240-01 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 250-01. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion, Jewish culture and Jewish literature in various historical periods. We will begin by looking at the roles of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, though the course will concentrate on gendered representations of Jews since the 19th century and contemporary debates about gender in modern Jewish life. What are the cultural and historical sources of Jewish stereotypes, such as the Jewish American Princess, the Jewish mother or the effeminate (and nuerotic) Jewish male? In what way has the advent of feminism challenged Judiasm's traditional gender roles and the roles of male/female in the Jewish family? Readings explore the connection between gender stereotypes and anti-Semitism and how they have affected relations among Jews and between Jews and non-Jews.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 08
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 123-02 Black Feminist Thoughts
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03, AMST 200-03 and WGST 202-01. This course provides perspectives on the development and materialization of Black feminist thoughts within historical, social, political, and cultural contexts. Interdisciplinary in focus, it surveys feminist politics and theories through films, popular culture, manifestoes, literary texts, and theoretical and historical essays. It offers an interdisciplinary survey of African-American and other African descendant womens contributions to feminist theory as a heterogeneous field of knowledge encompassing multiple streams of gender- and race-cognizant articulation and praxis. This course will pair primary texts authored by black women with secondary text produced by black feminist scholars; these critiques will illustrate the myriad ways black feminists engage with and seek to transform representations of black female experience. During the course, we will identify and characterize the major issues that black feminists address as well as the various contemporary forms of resistance to social structures. In addition, the course will explore the diversity and ambiguity of various black feminisms through a number of frames, such as gender theory, critical race theory, queer theory, and reproductive rights and practices. Caribbean, Afro-Latina, and Black British feminisms are also included as we map feminist consciousness and practice across the African Diaspora.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in PSYC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PSYC 135-01 Psychology of Women and Gender
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 135-01.
1330:TF   KAUF 179
PSYC 435-01 Gender and Sexual Identities
Instructor: Megan Yost
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 305-01.
1500:TF   KAUF 187
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 250-01 Women, Gender and Judaism
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 240-01. This course examines issues of gender in Jewish religion, Jewish culture and Jewish literature in various historical periods. We will begin by looking at the roles of women in the Bible and other classical Jewish texts, though the course will concentrate on gendered representations of Jews since the 19th century and contemporary debates about gender in modern Jewish life. What are the cultural and historical sources of Jewish stereotypes, such as the Jewish American Princess, the Jewish mother or the effeminate (and nuerotic) Jewish male? In what way has the advent of feminism challenged Judiasm's traditional gender roles and the roles of male/female in the Jewish family? Readings explore the connection between gender stereotypes and anti-Semitism and how they have affected relations among Jews and between Jews and non-Jews.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 08
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 327-01 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-03.
1030:TF   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-03 Writing About Sexuality and Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-04. The primary goal of this writing intensive course is to develop students writing skills in Spanish. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work. The courses central aim is to help students in the development of ideas, creativity, organization, and basic research skills that shape strong academic writing. Throughout the semester students will broaden their lexicon and knowledge of Hispanic cultures through the critical analysis of film and literature. As we analyze various representations of sexuality, we will discuss what these expressions of pleasure and desire tell us about cultural practices, beliefs, values, and social institutions. In addition to readings, you will be asked to watch films outside of class.
1030:TR   BOSLER 313