Fall 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Michael Stambolis-Ruhstorfer
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
SOCI 230-01 Sociology of Gender
Instructor: Michael Stambolis-Ruhstorfer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-06.
1330:MW   DENNY 311
SOCI 230-02 The Sociology of Law and Public Policy: Defining Social Problems and Creating Change
Instructor: Michael Stambolis-Ruhstorfer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-05. What is the law and what are public policy interventions? This course invites you to think about these questions by revealing the people and processes behind these institutions integral to contemporary democracies. We will cover the theoretical and methodological foundations of the sociology of law and public policy. You will also learn about the people and groups who produce, dispense, and interpret the law as well as the effects (intentional or not) their actions have on our lives. Finally, through examples of current issues, such as same-sex marriage, sexual harassment, and fatherhood politics, we will explore how people resist laws and policies as they fight for change in an increasingly globalized world.
1330:TF   DENNY 110
SOCI 230-03 Religion: Conflict, Violence and Peacemaking
Instructor: Shalom Staub
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 228-01.This course will examine the nexus of conflict/violence and religious belief in an attempt to understand the confusing array of contemporary conflicts in which multiple sides claim divine authority for their actions.
1500:MR   EASTC 301
SOCI 230-04 Political Economy of Gender
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 214-01 and WGSS 202-04. Political Economy of Gender adopts a gender-aware perspective to examine how people secure their livelihoods through labor market and nonmarket work. The course examines nature of labor market inequalities by gender, race, ethnicity and other social categories, how they are integrated with non-market activities, their wellbeing effects, their role in the macroeconomy, and the impact of macroeconomic policies on these work inequalities. These questions are examined from the perspective of feminist economics that has emerged since the early 1990s as a heterodox economics discourse, critical of both mainstream and gender-blind heterodox economics. While we will pay special attention to the US economy, our starting point is that there is one world economy with connections between the global South and the North, in spite of the structural differences between (and within) these regions.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
SOCI 230-05 Asian America Through Popular Culture
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler, Vy Dao
Course Description:
This course uses the lens of popular culture to better understand the formation, socialization, and dynamic creation of various Asian identities in America. Specifically, we examine economic, political, and social forces for shaping the perceptions of Asian communities in the American imagination, and we look to how popular imagery and stereotypes are accepted, challenged, or changed by Asian Americans today. Students will also have an opportunity to investigate a particular topic of interest such as heritage foodways, second generation identity, popular television, or trends in music and digital media.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
SOCI 230-06 Social Movements and Collective Behavior
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler, Vy Dao
Course Description:
This course introduces classic and contemporary theories of social movements and group mobilization. Drawing upon cases studies in the United States, Latin America, Europe and Asia, students will compare the historical, political, and socioeconomic forces that underscore protest activism as well as investigate the divergent forces that bring about unequal outcomes from different social movements.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
SOCI 230-07 Race, Identity, and Inequalities
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler, Vy Dao
Course Description:
Assertions of race, racial and ethnic identity have enormous power as organizing constructs in social life. This course uses a comparative historical approach to understand the biological, social, cultural, economic and political forces that construct and reinforce racial formation. Special focus is placed on racial inequalities, and students will investigate how younger generations of individuals and groups interact with stratification to reveal new approaches to engaging with race, inequality, and identity creation.
1130:MWF   DENNY 311
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
The quantitative research methods course introduces students to basic principles of social science research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students will use examples from scholarly research to understand concepts related to research design, sample selection, appropriate measurement, and survey construction. Additionally, students will apply these concepts to conduct introductory data analysis. Using elemental tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, students will learn to quantitatively assess social research questions in order to draw meaningful conclusions. Prerequisite: 110 or ANTH 100 or ANTH 101.
1330:MR   DENNY 112
SOCI 330-01 Classical Sociological Theory
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in classical sociological theory (through 1925). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every fall.
0900:TR   DENNY 103
SOCI 400-01 Contemporary Urban Ethnography
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
This course will engage students in a sociological study of cities and communities through the lens of contemporary urban ethnography. Urban sociology provides an important perspective on the spatial dimensions of prosperity and inequality; and illuminates the metropolis as a site of culture, growth, innovation, community, competition, and resistance. With a primary focus on U.S. cities, we will examine issues such as criminal justice, political mobilization, sexual communities, housing, education, social capital, gentrification, and symbolic identity.
1330:T   DENNY 315
SOCI 400-02 Postmodernism, Culture & Communication
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
This course is based on the premise that much of what has been said within sociology and related disciplines in the last century is becoming obsolete. A wide range of theories, theorists, methods, and phenomena important in even recent developments in the social sciences and humanities seem no longer relevant. Industrialization and modernity, for example, have given way to postindustrialization and postmodernity. According to some, modernist logic and culture have been replaced by postmodern ways of knowing, being, and doing. The questions asked by many sociologists in an effort to understand such things as society, culture, the self, gender, race, and oppression must be reconsidered. We will do that this semester in a seminar format that will allow us to discuss relevant texts from the last quarter of the 20th century at the same time that we engage our own sociological interests.
1330:W   EASTC 406