Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences and US Diversity requirements.
0830:MWF   DENNY 211
SOCI 225-01 Race and Ethnicity
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.
1500:TR   DENNY 304
SOCI 230-01 Economy and Society
Instructor: Charles Barone
Course Description:
Examines the historical evolution of economic relations between individuals/groups that take place within existing social relations and the greater social structures of society. Societies have over time organized the production and distribution of material goods and services in a variety of forms: from prehistoric communal institutions; to slavery in ancient classical societies; to feudalism in the middle ages; and to our own present day institutions of global capitalism. Understanding the ways in which technology, economics institutions, social institutions, and ideology are interrelated and have evolved over time will help to understand how the U.S. economy works. Analyzing the role of markets (supply and demand) and social structures (class, race, and gender) in capitalism will help to illuminate how the U.S. economy works and provide insights into contemporary social and economic problems such as social justice and inequality, financial crises, and environmental sustainability. Alternatives to our present day economy and society will be briefly explored.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
SOCI 230-02 Sustainability: Social Justice and Human Rights
Instructor: Joyce Bylander
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-07. History "is a crab scuttling sideways, a drip of soft water wearing away stone, an earthquake breaking centuries of tension." (Solnit, Rebecca, Hope in the Dark, 2004). This course will examine the importance of the environmental movement and broader definitions of sustainability. We will explore examples of direct action, of serendipitous change, and of world-changing events that have moved us more clearly toward an understanding of "our" shared future on this planet. We will survey the issues connected to sustainable systems and will focus more specifically on issues related to food, water and energy. Through readings, film, and experiential activities the course will challenge us to analyze the impact of various actors and assess our own responsibility.
1330:MR   WESTC DURBIN
SOCI 230-03 Environmental Sociology
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
Environmental Sociology examines relationships between society and the environment. As populations have grown and our technologies have advanced, so has our impact on the environment.Environmental Sociology explores the political economy, the distribution of goods and bads, and seeks to find solutions to achieving sustainability.This course will examine the causes and consequences of ever-greater consumption, environmental and industrial disasters and accidents, global climate change and environmental refugees, and environmental racism and classism.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
SOCI 230-04 Prisons and Punishment in American Society
Instructor: Marisol LeBron
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01. The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. More than two million men and women are currently locked up behind bars, a population constituting roughly one in every one hundred American adults. What has led to this phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in the growth of the prison system in American society. We will examine how race, class, education, gender, and sexuality shape the American legal system and impact the demography of prisons. We will also pay special attention to the intersections between the growth of for-profit prisons, the increasing criminalization of low-level drug offenses, and the rise of zero tolerance policing. We will conclude the course by considering alternatives to the current prison system and debate whether we can envision a world without prisons. This course will analyze a wide range of texts including, scholarly monographs, prison writings, documentaries, zines, and photographs. Readings for this course will include Michelle Alexanders The New Jim Crow, Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauers graphic novel Race to Incarcerate, and Angela Davis Are Prisons Obsolete?
0900:TR   DENNY 203
SOCI 230-05 Environmental & Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-08.This course reviews social inequities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of notions of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we will explore how marginalized communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across places exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. A review of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to explore collective action to contest social and environmental injustices.
1500:TR   TOME 115
SOCI 234-01 Middle Eastern American Communities
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with MEST 234-01.
1030:MWF   DENNY 203
SOCI 238-01 Consumer Culture
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
The sociology of consumerism is a major specialty in European sociology, and is only recently receiving attention by American sociologists. In this class, we will examine the increasing importance of consumerism in daily life and the degree to which culture has become commercialized. We will discuss the sign value of commodities, as well as the shift from a stratification system based on the relationship of the means of production to one based on styles and patterns of consumption. We will also concern ourselves with the relationships between consumption and more traditional sociological concerns such as gender, race, and social class.Offered every two years.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
SOCI 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.
1330:TF   DENNY 104
SOCI 272-01 Islam and the West
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with MEST 272-01.
1230:MWF   DENNY 303
SOCI 313-01 Oral History: Gay Lesbian
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler, Lonna Malmsheimer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-04.This course is focused on collecting and recording the individual life stories of LGBT people in central Pennsylvania during the latter half of the twentieth and the first years of the twenty-first centuries. Life for LGBT Americans has changed substantially over the past 50 years. As recently as the 1960s, gay citizens could be and were arrested, incarcerated, and hospitalized (against their will) as either sick, sinful or criminal. Gays and lesbians were widely seen as a threat to the family, religion and law to the American way of life. This social hatred and fear drove LGBT individuals to suppress their desires and hide their orientation. With the sexual revolution of the sixties and seventies, related movements for both womens and gay liberation developed. LGBT people came out and sought to change not only this ideology, but also the laws and structures that institutionally enforced sexual and gender conformity. In this course, students will be trained in oral history methods and will collect the stories of LGBT residents in our area. These interviews will contribute to the developing archival project that is sponsored by the Central Pennsylvania LGBT Center (www.centralpalgbtcenter/lgbt-history-project) and the Dickinson College Archives. In addition to collecting oral histories, students will transcribe their interviews and share their findings in research papers and class presentations. Please note that in addition to scheduled course meetings, students will schedule and conduct off-campus interviews with residents of central Pennsylvania.
1330:TR   DENNY 304
SOCI 331-01 Contemporary Sociological Theory
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in contemporary sociological theory (1925-present). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every spring.
1130:MWF   DENNY 204
SOCI 405-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.
1330:W   STERN 12
SOCI 550-01 Racial Microaggressions On Campus: A Qualitative Analysis
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description: