Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
SOCI 225-01 Race and Ethnicity
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
This course explores the historical and contemporary significance of race and ethnicity in the United States. Students will examine how racial inequality has become a pervasive aspect of U.S. society and why it continues to impact our life chances. We will address race and ethnicity as socio-historical concepts and consider how these social fictions (in collusion with gender, class, and sexuality) produce very real material conditions in everyday life. We will develop a theoretical vocabulary for discussing racial stratification by examining concepts such as prejudice, discrimination, systemic/institutional racism, racial formations, and racial hegemony. We will then look closely at colorblind racism, and examine how this dominant ideology naturalizes social inequality. With this framework in place, students will investigate racial stratification in relation to schools, the labor market, the criminal justice system, neighborhood segregation, immigration, etc. Finally, we will discuss strategies of anti-racism that seek to eliminate enduring racial hierarchies. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   DENNY 103
SOCI 230-01 Transportation Justice
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
Transportation systems--airports, bridges, highways, railroads, and more--have developed in the United States in ways that reflect social, cultural, and political histories. The stated goals for improvements or reforms to these systems have aligned with national priorities: enhancing America's standing by enabling safe and efficient transportation of people, goods, and services. In reality, however, these systems have contributed to structural inequalities by systematically excluding certain groups while advancing the interests of other groups. Improving equality in access to transportation has been a central concern of civil rights advocates for decades. This course examines the sociological factors that have contributed to the development of unequal transportation systems in the United States, with a particular focus on recent advocacy efforts to achieve transportation equity.
1330:MR   DENNY 21
SOCI 230-02 Religion: Conflict, Violence and Peacemaking
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 228-01. This course will examine the nexus of conflict/violence and religious belief in an attempt to understand the confusing array of contemporary conflicts in which multiple sides claim divine authority for their actions.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
SOCI 230-03 Social Movements, Social Media and Global Change
Instructor: Jacob Jacob
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 320-02 and INST 290-04.Just as the printing press and the early public spheres created the tools and the space for the rise of nationalist and religious movements in 16th century Europe, new communication technologies and social media have created both the space and the tools for the rise of social movements in contemporary society. Movements such as the Arab Spring, the Kony 2012 campaign, #BlackLivesMatter, #BringBackOurGirls among others have drawn on social media to mobilize and organize popular interventions in the public sphere. This course is a conceptual and applied exploration of the complex interactions between the ecologies of social movements and social media, within the context of an increasingly globalized public sphere. In addition to studying these interactions, students work in teams to develop authentic social movement campaigns on issues they care about. The course climaxes with students presenting their campaigns to a college audience.
1030:TR   DENNY 212
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Quantitative Research Methods introduces students to basic principles of sociological research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students learn to conceptualize a research question, operationalize key concepts, identify relevant literature, and form research hypotheses. Then, using elementary tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, they choose appropriate statistical methods, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions. Special emphasis is given to interpreting numbers with clear, persuasive language, in both oral and written formats. Students will become proficient in using quantitative software for data analysis. Two and a half hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 110.
1330:MR   DENNY 112
SOCI 313-01 The Sociological Imagination meets Indigenous Ways of Knowing
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
This seminar will focus on education and (in)equality and will explore our understanding of the life course and the ways in which history and biography interact. How do cultures and political economies in particular times and places influence peoples lived experiences and their life choices and life chances? Case studies will include the complex and controversial history of the Carlisle Indian School that enrolled over 8,000 young people from virtually every Native nation between 1879-1918. Students will have the opportunity to conduct oral history interviews with descendants and delve into archival research as the community commemorates the 100th Anniversary of the closing of the Carlisle Indian School that will bring Indigenous artists, writers, playwrights, and speakers to campus.
1330:W   DENNY 303
SOCI 313-03 Building Sustainable Communities
Instructor: Cornelius Leary
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SUST 301-01. Many communities are embracing sustainability as a goal of community development, giving weight to social equity, economic security and ecological integrity as they work to build the capacity of their residents to improve the quality of their lives. In this practicum course we will explore different visions for and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities, examine approaches to sustainable community development and learn about Carlisle as a case study. Student learning will be reinforced through a semester-long community-based team research project that brings students, instructor and community partners together to address a community development issue of concern to members of the Carlisle community.
1030:TR   KAUF 178
SOCI 313-04 China Practicum
Instructor: Ann Hill, Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 345-01. Permission of instructor required.
 
SOCI 331-01 Contemporary Sociological Theory
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in contemporary sociological theory (1925-present). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every spring.
1030:MWF   DENNY 303
SOCI 400-01 Immigration, Race & Ethnicity
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
During the 2016 campaign, then-candidate and now President Trump proposed U.S. immigration policies that included building a wall and banning all Muslims from entry. How did immigrants shift from welcomed huddled masses to potential terrorists and rapists? This is at a time when immigrants and their children number roughly 81 million or about 26% of the U.S. total population. This means one in four are either foreign-born or a child in an immigrant family. Todays immigrants no longer originate from Europe but hail from Latin America, Asia, the Caribbean. Considering these demographic changes, in this course we will explore the historical, cultural and social meanings attached to immigrant and American from a variety of different perspectives. In so doing, we will pay attention to how ideas of nationality and citizenship shaped by the political, economic and social factors both within and outside of nation-state borders. How do these shifting demographics impact ideologies of race, ethnicity and nationality and what it means to be a citizen in the contemporary context? The objective of this course is to engage with the theoretical debates on immigration and processes of incorporation and assimilation to gain a better understanding of its impact on the everyday realities of growing numbers of immigrants.
1330:T   DENNY 204
SOCI 400-02 Language and Power
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
Social theory underwent dramatic changes in the last quarter of the 20th century by taking a linguistic turn. In this class we will examine this turn, looking at how it has replaced more traditional sociological approaches such as structural functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interactionism. We will focus in particular on the contributions of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, and Pierre Bourdieu, considering the ways in which each conceptualizes language and its relationships with power. We'll use these ideas to frame research projects with the goal of engaging in a Foucauldian, Bourdieuian, or Butlerian analysis of social life.
1330:F   DENNY 204