Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences and US Diversity requirements.
1030:MWF   DENNY 104
SOCI 230-01 Global Urban Poverty
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-02.Global Urban Poverty is designed to provide a view of major social problems facing humanity in developing urban environments. Understanding that there is one planet and that what happens to peoples in one location affects peoples in another is an important part of living in the 21st century. As developing nations undergo a demographic shift from rural to urban majority populations, the stresses placed on government infrastructure in the areas of sanitation, housing, education, safety and security are immense. Urban poverty affects not only the poor, but also the affluent, as cities become contested sites. This course examines major social problems within the context of developing world urban poverty and seeks to stimulate students to evaluate their own lives in the context of larger social forces.
1500:WF   DENNY 311
SOCI 230-02 Dealing with Data: Social Problems/Policy
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
How does one measure quality of life? If you had a free choice, where would you want to live? On what basis would you decide? How does your nationality, race, class, and gender affect your access to health care, prison, higher education, potable water? Or the probability of your dying before age 5 or living beyond age 75? Using a series of case studies, this course will examine demographic and socio-economic data, focusing on the development (and social construction) of social problems and social policy recommendations designed to eliminate or ameliorate those problems. While addressing social problems and policies, the course is skills-based and teaches students how to access relevant and reliable data, and then assess, analyze, and present those data in order to build strong arguments. Work will include short weekly readings and reports that use empirical data to argue points of view on a particular social issue and/or policy, debates, visual presentations, and a final policy brief of the students choosing. Issues to be examined are likely to include: wealth and health disparities both within and across countries; crime and incarceration rates by demographic characteristics and across countries; gender inequality and gender violence; teen pregnancy and reproductive health; MDGs and quality of life within and across countries; and immigration.
1330:F   DENNY 112
SOCI 230-03 Religion: Conflict, Violence and Peacemaking
Instructor: Shalom Staub
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 228-01. This course will examine the nexus of conflict/violence and religious belief in an attempt to understand the confusing array of contemporary conflicts in which multiple sides claim divine authority for their actions. Looking at this "problem" across multiple cases, both domestically and internationally, this course will challenge you to understand the common patterns and variations to religiously justified conflict and violence, as well as the ways that religion can provide the deep narrative for conflict resolution and peace building.
1500:MR   EASTC 301
SOCI 230-04 American Capitalism and Social Justice
Instructor: Jonathan Cogliano
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with AMST 200-04 and ECON 223-01.Designed for those interested in social activism and social justice, this course draws on critical perspectives from Political Economy, American Studies and Sociology to examine how power is structured in American capitalism across institutions including the social relations of production and distribution, corporations, and markets. Special attention is given to the ways in which powerful economic groups and organizations are able to exert economic control, influence government, and dominate American institutions, such as the media, that shape American culture. Looking beyond capitalism, social movements for greater social and economic justice, and greater economic and political democracy are also examined.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 109
SOCI 230-05 American Capitalism and Social Justice
Instructor: Jonathan Cogliano
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with AMST 200-05 and ECON 223-02.Designed for those interested in social activism and social justice, this course draws on critical perspectives from Political Economy, American Studies and Sociology to examine how power is structured in American capitalism across institutions including the social relations of production and distribution, corporations, and markets. Special attention is given to the ways in which powerful economic groups and organizations are able to exert economic control, influence government, and dominate American institutions, such as the media, that shape American culture. Looking beyond capitalism, social movements for greater social and economic justice, and greater economic and political democracy are also examined.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 109
SOCI 230-06 The City, the Suburb, and the Inequality of Place
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
In the United States, where we live has a profound effect on our life chances. It shapes the schools we attend, the safety of our families, and our exposure to environmental hazards. It also influences the composition of our social networks and the resources those networks confer. This course explores the significance of place, especially neighborhoods, in the reproduction of racial and social class inequalities. Specific issues include: race and residential segregation, suburbanization, social capital, education, sexual communities, gentrification, and 'stop and frisk' policies.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
1330:WF   DENNY 311
SOCI 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 240-01.
1330:T   DENNY 115
1030:TR   DENNY 303
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
The quantitative research methods course introduces students to basic principles of social science research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students will use examples from scholarly research to understand concepts related to research design, sample selection, appropriate measurement, and survey construction. Additionally, students will apply these concepts to conduct introductory data analysis. Using elemental tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, students will learn to quantitatively assess social research questions in order to draw meaningful conclusions. Prerequisite: 110 or ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and QR graduation requirement. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 241.
1330:MR   DENNY 112
SOCI 327-01 Sex, Gender, and Religion
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-03.
1030:TF   DENNY 110
SOCI 330-01 Classical Sociological Theory
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in classical sociological theory (through 1925). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every fall.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 206
SOCI 400-01 Theoretical Perspectives on Race & Ethnicity
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
This senior seminar focuses on historical and contemporary theories on race and ethnicity. The course will trace the ways in which sociologists have come to understand race and ethnicity as ideas and as central organizing principles of social life. Beginning at the turn of the 20th century, we will examine sociological treatments of race and ethnicity including Marxist perspectives; assimilation and contact theories; internal colonialism; social-psychological theories; racial formation; Black feminist thought; and critical race theory. We will pay special emphasis to how race and ethnicity have been conceptualized in relation to gender, sexuality, and social class.
1330:T   DENNY 204
SOCI 400-02 Technology and Society
Instructor: Erik Love
Course Description:
How many times today have you checked your phone to see if you had a message waiting? It's likely that your answer to that question will probably be "too many to count." In the past two decades, rapid development of communication technology has transformed how Americans relate with one another. However, recent research questions whether the overall level of social connection in America has actually decreased over the past twenty years. This seminar will consider sociological theories about technology, and look at empirical research on contemporary lived experiences during rapid technological development, with a particular focus on communications technologies.
1330:T   DENNY 303