Fall 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and US Diversity requirement.
0830:MWF   DENNY 304
SOCI 110-02 Social Analysis
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and US Diversity requirement.
1030:TR   KAUF 179
SOCI 230-02 Environmental Sociology
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
Environmental Sociology examines relationships between society and the environment. As populations have grown and our technologies have advanced, so has our impact on the environment.Environmental Sociology explores the political economy, the distribution of goods and bads, and seeks to find solutions to achieving sustainability.This course will examine the causes and consequences of ever-greater consumption, environmental and industrial disasters and accidents, global climate change and environmental refugees, and environmental racism and classism.
1230:MWF   DENNY 211
SOCI 230-03 American Capitalism and Social Justice
Instructor: Jonathan Cogliano
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-03 and ECON 223-01.This course introduces students to the practice of Political Economy, which engages in a critical examination of the economic and social underpinnings of a capitalist society and their political and cultural effects. The course will analyze the U.S. economy within a global context and examine such issues as the social relations of production and distribution, markets, the labor process, cycles of growth and accumulation, and economic crises. Attention will be given to asymmetries of power and influence in government, media, and other institutions that shape American culture. Questions of the sustainability of capitalism and the viability of alternatives that could improve social and economic justice will be discussed.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 207
SOCI 230-04 American Capitalism and Social Justice
Instructor: Jonathan Cogliano
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04 and ECON 223-02.This course introduces students to the practice of Political Economy, which engages in a critical examination of the economic and social underpinnings of a capitalist society and their political and cultural effects. The course will analyze the U.S. economy within a global context and examine such issues as the social relations of production and distribution, markets, the labor process, cycles of growth and accumulation, and economic crises. Attention will be given to asymmetries of power and influence in government, media, and other institutions that shape American culture. Questions of the sustainability of capitalism and the viability of alternatives that could improve social and economic justice will be discussed.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 207
SOCI 230-05 Environmental & Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-04.This course reviews social inequities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of notions of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we will explore how marginalized communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across places exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. A review of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to explore collective action to contest social and environmental injustices.
1330:TR   KAUF 187
SOCI 230-06 Crime and Punishment in American Society
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-06.This course is concerned with a wide range of issues surrounding crime and punishment in society. Our main focus will be prisons and punishment, but we will also address issues such as the demographics, image, patterns, and consequences of crime and punishment in contemporary society. We will consider the ways in which society and social factors influence crime and punishment, as well as the ways in which crime and punishment impact various components of society. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing materials from sociology, philosophy, economics, history, psychology, American Studies, and criminal justice. The course will likely include a weekday visit to the State Correctional Institute at Camp Hill and a Saturday visit to Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia.
1500:MW   DENNY 212
SOCI 233-01 Asian American Communities
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
This class is designed to move from theoretical understandings of race, and racial identity as it operates in our everyday lives to larger, structural determinants of race with special attention to the unique position of Asian Americans in U.S. race relations. This course focuses on social relations, political identities and activism, immigration and labor experiences to explore the ways Asian Americans have contributed to our larger histories as Americans. Broken down into three sections, this class analyzes the position of Asian Americans in the following interconnected contexts: (a) Asian Americans in relation to dominant society, (b) Asian Americans in relation to other communities of color, and (c) pan-Asian relations. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and the U.S. Diversity graduation requirement. Offered every year.
0900:TR   DENNY 104
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Anthony Barnum
Course Description:
This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 212
SOCI 237-01 Global Inequality
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required Exploring the relationship between globalization and inequality, this course examines the complex forces driving the integration of ideas, people, societies and economies worldwide. This inquiry into global disparities will consider the complexities of growth, poverty reduction, and the roles of international organizations. Among the global issues under scrutiny, will be environmental degradation; debt forgiveness; land distribution; sweatshops, labor practices and standards; slavery in the global economy; and the vulnerability of the world's children. Under specific investigation will be the social construction and processes of marginalization, disenfranchisement and the effects of globalization that have reinforced the division between the world's rich and poor. Offered every year.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
SOCI 244-01 Quantitative Research Methods
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. The quantitative research methods course introduces students to basic principles of social science research methodologies and statistical analysis. Students will use examples from scholarly research to understand concepts related to research design, sample selection, appropriate measurement, and survey construction. Additionally, students will apply these concepts to conduct introductory data analysis. Using elemental tools of descriptive and inferential statistics, students will learn to quantitatively assess social research questions in order to draw meaningful conclusions. Prerequisite: 110 or ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and QR graduation requirement. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 241.
1330:MR   DENNY 112
SOCI 330-01 Classical Sociological Theory
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in classical sociological theory (through 1925). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every fall.
0930:MWF   DENNY 303
SOCI 400-01 Sociology of Violence
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
While dealing with broad conceptualizations of violence, this course will focus on gender and sexual violence in the context of domestic and international disputes. We will examine: the social construction of gender and violence; social policy regarding violence; interpersonal violence: rape in the context of both wartime and peacetime, domestic violence (battering, child abuse, sexual abuse); women's rights as human rights; and the politics of trauma, memory, and denial.
1330:T   CMST SEM
SOCI 400-02 Immigration, Race & Ethnicity
Instructor: Helene Lee
Course Description:
Immigration flows have risen around the globe and include educational migrants, temporary workers, professional migrants, refugees, permanent residents and undocumented migrants. In the U.S. between 1990 and 2000, immigrants and their children constituted nearly 70% of overall population growth. Today, nearly 20% of Americans 18 years and younger are immigrants or the children of immigrants. As these numbers continue to rise, how are ideas of nationality and citizenship shaped by the political, economic and social factors both within and outside of nation-state borders? How do these shifting demographics impact ideologies of race, ethnicity and nationality and what it means to be a citizen in the contemporary context? What new cultural forms emerge from the constant influx of immigrants and how does this impact the lived experience of people located betwixt and between national borders?
1330:W   DENNY 303
SOCI 500-01 Family Planning in Cameroon
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description: