Spring 2017

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 110-01 Social Analysis
Instructor: Se Hwa Lee
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
1500:MW   DENNY 317
SOCI 110-02 Social Analysis
Instructor: Se Hwa Lee
Course Description:
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.
1330:MW   DENNY 211
SOCI 224-01 Families and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-04. In this comparative course in family systems, we will study the impact of production and politics on family life in various cultures, including Africa, Latin America, the Far East and the United States. The course uses ethnographic studies and documentaries to illuminate the impact of the political economy on family life, the life course, and gender roles and relationships. Various theories of development will place the ethnographies into socio-political and historical context.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
SOCI 230-01 Sociology of Disasters
Instructor: Vy Dao
Course Description:
While catastrophes may interrupt the normal operations of a society at any time, it is not always clear what makes these interruptions disastrous. This course establishes the theoretical foundations of how sociologists examine natural and technological disasters. Students will first learn the historical establishment of US policy regarding disaster response, before considering contemporary perspectives and theories on risk and response. We will also examine the social and pop-cultural production of calamity through the lens of media and communication.
1330:MW   DENNY 110
SOCI 230-02 Environmental and Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 280-01.This course reviews social inequalities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we explore how marginalized people and communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across place exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. Examples of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to understand collective action to counter social and environmental injustices.
1330:TF   KAUF 187
SOCI 230-04 Contemporary American Families
Instructor: Se Hwa Lee
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-06.This course is an introduction to research literature on how women, men, and children experience various forms of family life in the United States today. Topics include definitions of families; a historical overview of American families; intimate relationships; work and family issues (both paid and unpaid work); childhood and parenting; divorce and remarriage; and migrant families. This course emphasizes diversity among American families and attempts to examine research literature with a critical eye to underlying assumptions.
1330:TR   DENNY 21
SOCI 236-01 Inequalities in the U.S.
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.
1500:TR   DANA 101
SOCI 238-01 Consumer Culture
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
The sociology of consumerism is a major specialty in European sociology, and is only recently receiving attention by American sociologists. In this class, we will examine the increasing importance of consumerism in daily life and the degree to which culture has become commercialized. We will discuss the sign value of commodities, as well as the shift from a stratification system based on the relationship of the means of production to one based on styles and patterns of consumption. We will also concern ourselves with the relationships between consumption and more traditional sociological concerns such as gender, race, and social class.Offered every two years.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
SOCI 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Vy Dao
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students will design their own field projects. Prerequisite: 110 or ANTH 101.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
SOCI 240-02 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Susan Rose
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students will design their own field projects. Prerequisite: 110 or ANTH 101.
1330:W   CMST SEM
SOCI 313-01 Contemporary Human Trafficking
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 301-01. This class will introduce students to contemporary issues of human trafficking in the United States and globally. Human trafficking, including both commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor, is an extremely complex crime and human rights violation that demands multi-faceted, interdisciplinary responses. After we develop an understanding of the definition and various manifestations of human trafficking, we will build on the US Governments 4Ps framework--prosecution, protection, prevention and partnership-- as a way to shape our investigation and inquiry. Topics for discussion will include demand, vulnerability factors, economic networks, governmental and non-governmental organization responses, criminal justice systems, support and services for survivors, prevention efforts, corporate social responsibility, and literary and cultural representations of human trafficking. Readings will include international, federal and state legislation, survivor narratives, research reports, white papers, news coverage, films, and novels.
1330:TF   DENNY 104
SOCI 331-01 Contemporary Sociological Theory
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description:
This course will examine alternative ways of understanding the human being, society, and culture as they have been presented in contemporary sociological theory (1925-present). It will focus on the theoretical logic of accounting for simple and complex forms of social life, interactions between social processes and individual and group identities, major and minor changes in society and culture, and the linkages between intimate and large-scale human experience. Prerequisite: 110 and one additional course in sociology, or permission of instructor. Offered every spring.
1030:TR   DENNY 204
SOCI 405-01 Senior Thesis
Instructor: Amy Steinbugler
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required Independent study, in consultation with a specially constituted faculty committee, of a problem area chosen by the student. The student should, in addition to pursuing his/her own interests, also seek to demonstrate how various perspectives within sociology and, where relevant, other disciplines bear on the topic chosen. Permission of the instructor required.
1330:M   CMST SEM
SOCI 500-01 Sociological Factors and Trauma
Instructor: J Daniel Schubert
Course Description: