Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-03 The Legend of King Arthur: From Medieval to Monty Python
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
The legend of King Arthur has captured imaginations for hundreds of years, inspiring adaptations even into the present day. Yet when the legend originated a millennium ago, it was already considered a tale of a bygone age, the dream of a romantic past. This class will study the medieval origins of the King Arthur story and then trace that legend through time to the present day, including the films King Arthur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. As we read, we will consider how each text responds to both its historical context and its own imagined past.
1330:TF   EASTC 405
ENGL 339-01 Where do Novels Come From
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Unlike age-old genres such as the lyric, epic, or drama, the novel describes itself as something, well, novel. In this course we will focus on what is new about the novel by reading founding texts of the British novel tradition, with some attention to earlier sources and Continental analogues. Authors will likely include Haywood, Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Equiano, Austen, and Goethe.
1330:TF   EASTC 300
ENGL 349-02 The Legend of King Arthur: From Medieval to Monty Python
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.The legend of King Arthur has captured imaginations for hundreds of years, inspiring adaptations even into the present day. Yet when the legend originated a millennium ago, it was already considered a tale of a bygone age, the dream of a romantic past. This class will study the medieval origins of the King Arthur story and then trace that legend through time to the present day, including the films King Arthur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. As we read, we will consider how each text responds to both its historical context and its own imagined past.
1330:TF   EASTC 405
ENGL 359-01 Angels and Demons in Medieval and Renaissance Drama
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
From the soaring orations of God and the admonitions of angels to the blasphemies and deceptions of devils, the denizens of heaven and hell occupied considerable time and space on the medieval and early modern stage. In the mouths of supernatural beings, playwrights could ask challenging questions about subjects such as religion, government, free will, gendered relationships, personal identity, and the nature of literature. This class will explore these issues through the lens of early English drama, from amateur medieval guilds to the rise of professional public theaters, and will conclude with the study of these early works in performance today. Texts will include medieval cycle and morality plays, Marlowes Doctor Faustus, Shakespeares Hamlet, and Ben Jonsons The Devil is an Ass.
1030:TR   EASTC 405
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 106-01 Early Modern Europe to 1799
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Society, culture, and politics from the Renaissance through the French Revolution.
1130:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 213-01 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1500:TR   DENNY 311
HIST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 259-01 and RELG 259-01. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as MEST 259 and RELG 259.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ITAL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ITAL 321-01 Food and Culture in Medieval and Renaissance Italy
Instructor: James McMenamin, Luca Trazzi
Course Description:
Taught in English.Additional Time Slot: FLIC session: W, 4:00pm - 4:50pm, Bosler Hall 309, with Prof. Luca Trazzi. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors, and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will read some materials in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript. FLIC meeting time is scheduled for W, 4:00pm - 4:50pm (but can be changed should conflicts arise.)
1500:TR   BOSLER 213
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 316-01 Messiahs, Mystics and Heretics
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 316-01.
1330:W   EASTC 102
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 200-01 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 213-01. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1500:TR   DENNY 311
MEST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 259-01 and RELG 259-01. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as HIST 372 and RELG 259.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 202-01 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
This course treats the Rationalists, Empiricists and Kant, with particular emphasis on issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the role of sense perception and reason in knowledge, the nature of substance, God and reality.Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   EASTC 300
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 259-01 and MEST 259-01. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as HIST 259 and MEST 259.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
RELG 316-01 Messiahs, Mystics and Heretics
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 316-01.
1330:W   EASTC 102