Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEMS 200-03 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 213-01 and MEST 200-01. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1030:TR   DENNY 21
MEMS 200-04 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 213-02.This course will explore the everyday culture of early modern Europe including careful consideration of how people made sense of their world. It will range from examining religious rituals and objects such as relics to natural magic and the popular science that came with the Scientific Revolution. We will also examine the relationship between commoners and the elites while looking at how ideas spread whether by oral culture, images or the new technology of printing.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
MEMS 200-05 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01 and POSC 180-01.
1130:MWF   DENNY 110
MEMS 200-09 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 220-02.
1330:MR   EASTC 107
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 212-01 Michelangelo-Man & Myth
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
In this course, we will explore the figure and art of Michelangelo from a historiographic and critical perspective. Understanding his role as an artist and the effect of his art on his contemporaries and subsequent generations of artists, critics, and scholars through our own era will be a primary goal. Readings will be drawn from a variety of primary and secondary sources, and will include writings by Michelangelo himself, critical and theoretical commentaries, historical narratives, and art-historical interpretations. Conflicts within the scholarly community about how we might understand and reconstruct his life will also be addressed, as well as how the idea of the creative process was constructed and enacted during the Renaissance in Italy.Prerequisite: 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.
1330:W   WEISS 219
Courses Offered in CLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CLST 253-01 Roman History
Instructor: Scott Farrington
Course Description:
An introduction to the history of ancient Rome focusing on the rise and fall of the Republic, the Augustan Age, and the Principate. Topics include race, gender, and sexuality. Students develop habits for reading ancient and modern sources critically. Assignments introduce students to the primary tools, methods, and conventions of researching and writing in the field of ancient history.
1030:TR   EASTC 312
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-03 The Legend of King Arthur: From Medieval to Monty Python
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
The legend of King Arthur has captured imaginations for hundreds of years, inspiring adaptations even into the present day. Yet when the legend originated a millennium ago, it was already considered a tale of a bygone age, the dream of a romantic past. This class will study the medieval origins of the King Arthur story and then trace that legend through time to the present day, including the films King Arthur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. As we read, we will consider how each text responds to both its historical context and its own imagined past.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
ENGL 321-01 Mapping the Global Middle Ages
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
From England to Jerusalem, Morocco to Rome, Ireland to India, the medieval traveler encountered and came to terms with varieties of cultures, religions, and races. The maps and written records of these travelers, both imagined and real, inspired the imaginations of their contemporaries and helped shape larger cultural narratives about nationalism, religion, and personal identity. This course will examine medieval maps and travel narratives from 1000-1500 CE in order to better understand the diverse cultural work performed by reports of encounters with other cultures. How did these travel narratives strengthen or question faith, critique or support nationalism, and establish or sustain gendered and racial identities?
1500:MR   EASTC 301
ENGL 341-01 Shakespeare: Politics/Culture
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
We will read seven plays representing Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories: Much Ado About Nothing, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Measure for Measure, MacBeth, Lear, and The Tempest. We will also view and discuss films of several of these plays by such directors as Branaugh, Casson, Greenaway, Kurosawa, and Noble. The secondary - theoretical - reading for the course will primarily draw upon New Historicist and Cultural Materialist criticism, first practiced in the US by Stephen Greenblatt in his Renaissance Self-Fashioning (1980). Where appropriate, we will also consider contextual and feminist issues. Assignments will include an in-class performance of a scene from one of the plays, a mid-term, a brief close reading essay, and a final research paper.
0900:TR   EASTC 405
ENGL 351-02 Dante's Divine Comedy
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 322-01. This topics course is on Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy. Although a special focus will be placed on the Inferno, which will be read in its entirety, various cantos from Purgatorio and Paradiso will also be studied. Aiding the students along their journey through Hell and beyond will be critical readings that consider the historical, social, cultural and literary context of the period. The poem will be read in English translation. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will write their papers in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript.
1500:TR   BOSLER 313
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 213-01 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01 and MEMS 200-03. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1030:TR   DENNY 21
HIST 213-02 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-04.This course will explore the everyday culture of early modern Europe including careful consideration of how people made sense of their world. It will range from examining religious rituals and objects such as relics to natural magic and the popular science that came with the Scientific Revolution. We will also examine the relationship between commoners and the elites while looking at how ideas spread whether by oral culture, images or the new technology of printing.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ITAL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ITAL 322-01 Dante's Divine Comedy
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 351-02.
1500:TR   BOSLER 313
ITAL 400-01 Boccaccio's 'Decameron' and the Elements of Storytelling
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
This course will focus on Boccaccio's Decameron with a critical eye on the construction of the text and the stylistic complexity of the individual novelle. Students will be guided to study the use of rhetoric as a means of empowerment from a variety of perspectives. The course will culminate in a research project of interdisciplinary nature that reflects each students personal interests.
1330:W   BOSLER 321
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 107-01 New Testament in Context
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 107-01. A critical examination and attempt to understand the New Testament as the written traditions which articulated the faith, expectations, and actions of the early Christians as they responded within Jewish and Greek culture to the historical events of their day, and especially as they responded to the life and death of Jesus of Nazareth. This course is cross-listed as RELG 107.
0930:MWF   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in LATN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LATN 243-01 Lucretius
Instructor: Marc Mastrangelo
Course Description:
Selections from the Epicurean philosopher's epic poem On the Nature of Things, with study of the philosophical and poetic background of the work, its reception in antiquity, and its relevance to modern concerns. Prerequisite: 202 or the equivalent. Offered every third year.
1030:TR   EASTC 111
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 200-01 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 213-01 and MEMS 200-03. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1030:TR   DENNY 21
MEST 200-04 Peace and Conflict in the Muslim Mediterranean World
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 260-03.This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Pre-Modern period, specifically in areas under control by Muslims. In particular, we will focus on points of peace and conflict in Late Antiquity in the eastern Mediterranean and early Medieval Iberia, as well as important intellectual and cultural exchanges that took place among these three groups. There will be a strong emphasis on relations in the early history of these three groups interactions.
1130:MWF   EASTC 301
MEST 200-05 Heretics, Pagans, and Martyrs: The Formation of Religious Identities in Late Antiquity
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 318-01.What is a Christian, a Muslim, or a Jew? This course will explore the concept of the 'other' in early Christianity, and how Christian identities were formed in dialogue with the surrounding pluralistic landscape. Attention will be paid to early definitions of heresy in the ancient world, and how these definitions were appropriated by theologians in the Latin and Greek world of Late Antiquity to suit their own needs. What kinds of movements were considered 'heresies', and why? How did Christians, Muslims and Jews understand who they were, and what made them different from others in the first eight centuries AD? We will begin briefly in the Ancient World, and proceed through the study of how Jewish, Christian, Muslim, and Pagan groups characterized each other, ending after the rise of Islam. The formation of Christian identities, as well as the boundary lines created to preserve such identities, are central themes in this course.
1330:W   EASTC 102
Courses Offered in PHIL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01 and MEMS 200-05. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1130:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 202-01 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
This course treats the Rationalists, Empiricists and Kant, with particular emphasis on issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the role of sense perception and reason in knowledge, the nature of substance, God and reality.Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   EASTC 102
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 180-01 and MEMS 200-05. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as PHIL 180.
1130:MWF   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 107-01 New Testament in Context
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 107-01. A critical examination and attempt to understand the New Testament as the written traditions which articulated the faith, expectations, and actions of the early Christians as they responded within Jewish and Greek culture to the historical events of their day, and especially as they responded to the life and death of Jesus of Nazareth. This course is cross-listed as JDST 107.
0930:MWF   DENNY 103
RELG 260-03 Peace and Conflict in the Muslim Mediterranean World
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-04.This course will survey relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Pre-Modern period, specifically in areas under control by Muslims. In particular, we will focus on points of peace and conflict in Late Antiquity in the eastern Mediterranean and early Medieval Iberia, as well as important intellectual and cultural exchanges that took place among these three groups. There will be a strong emphasis on relations in the early history of these three groups interactions.
1130:MWF   EASTC 301
RELG 318-01 Heretics, Pagans, and Martyrs: The Formation of Religious Identities in Late Antiquity
Instructor: Peter Schadler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-05.What is a Christian, a Muslim, or a Jew? This course will explore the concept of the 'other' in early Christianity, and how Christian identities were formed in dialogue with the surrounding pluralistic landscape. Attention will be paid to early definitions of heresy in the ancient world, and how these definitions were appropriated by theologians in the Latin and Greek world of Late Antiquity to suit their own needs. What kinds of movements were considered 'heresies', and why? How did Christians, Muslims and Jews understand who they were, and what made them different from others in the first eight centuries AD? We will begin briefly in the Ancient World, and proceed through the study of how Jewish, Christian, Muslim, and Pagan groups characterized each other, ending after the rise of Islam. The formation of Christian identities, as well as the boundary lines created to preserve such identities, are central themes in this course.
1330:W   EASTC 102
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 410-01 En memoria del bien: Memory of Good Lovin' in the Libro de 'buen amor'
Instructor: Abraham Quintanar
Course Description:
This seminar explores the multiple forms of good love as well as crazy love and the role memory plays in loving well as well in avoiding loving not so well. We explore various aspects of love from Godly love to physical love, as presented in the Libro, as we try to answer the age-old question: what exactly is good love?
1330:W   BOSLER 214