Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Ashley Bales
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:W   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Ashley Bales
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:T   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 101-01 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: Summer Wood
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. Offered every semester.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
ANTH 101-02 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: Noah Pleshet
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   DENNY 21
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Hendrik Van Gijseghem
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 210-01 Language and Culture
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
This course examines the relationship of language to culture and society. It includes the study of sociolinguistics, language acquisition, cognition, and descriptive linguistics. The student is introduced to major perspectives on language from Whorf, Hymes, de Saussure, and Levi-Strauss.
0900:TR   DENNY 211
ANTH 214-01 Ecological Anthropology
Instructor: Noah Pleshet
Course Description:
An examination of human adaption to changing environments with an emphasis on systems analysis. Special attention to development and current environmental problems. This course is cross-listed as ENST 214. Offered every other year.
1130:MWF   DENNY 203
ANTH 232-01 Modern China and Its Diaspora Communities
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02. This is a comparative course that examines contemporary Chinese communities in the PRC, as well as Chinese immigrant cultures located in Southeast Asia and the U.S. The focus is on both the structure of these communities and the processes of identity formation and re-imagining the "home" country or "native place" in the midst of considerable flux. The course explicitly uses comparison to deconstruct staid truths about "the Chinese" and monolithic "Chinese culture." Offered every other year.
1030:TR   DENNY 204
ANTH 241-01 Measurement and Quantification in the Social Sciences
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
This course focuses on quantitative data analysis. Students learn how to design, code, and analyze interviews and surveys. Selected databases and statistical programs are used to analyze current social issues and compare samples. Prerequisite: At least one course in SOCI, ANTH or AMST.
1330:MF   STERN 11
1330:W   STERN 11
ANTH 245-01 Global Genders
Instructor: Katherine Schweighofer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 201-01. This course takes up the question of gender outside of the United States, with emphasis on how gender shapes the distribution of power transnationally, transculturally, and transhistorically. Recognizing that women often bear the brunt of gender inequalities, we will examine how women are affected by and organize against oppression. We will also pay attention throughout the course to the ways in which gendered power distributions affect men, and consider non-binaried systems of sex and gender and their different power distributions. The operation of gender and gendered power is always shaped by race, class, sexuality, nationality, citizenship, and ability, which are therefore critical to our conversation. Course topics include gendered nationalism, the politics of veiling, neoliberal capitalism and its effects, sex work, sex tourism, migration and border politics, and the gendered effects of militarism and military occupation, among others.
1500:MR   DENNY 110
ANTH 256-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: Summer Wood
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1330:MR   DENNY 317
ANTH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Hendrik Van Gijseghem
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260-01 and ENST 311-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
1230:MWF   DENNY 212
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:M   ARCH LAB
ANTH 331-01 Principles of Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
1030:TR   DENNY 115
ANTH 345-01 Music, Film and Culture in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 310-02 and LALC 300-03.This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought, and culture through attention to artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Using films, music videos, ethnographies and other critical readings, we analyze how musical production and music events help us to define the Caribbean region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Employing case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Francophone, Hispanophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we look at how individuals and groups have used music to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups, resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:T   ALTHSE 204
ANTH 400-01 Senior Colloquium
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course is based on student independent research projects, supervised by the faculty colloquium coordinator, with special advisement from faculty colleagues. Students taking the course are encouraged to build on previous fieldwork experience or to develop new, community-based projects. In some cases, archival research may be substituted for fieldwork. The course can accommodate honors projects begun with faculty mentoring and aimed at publication. Prerequisite: 240, 241. Offered every year.
1330:T   DENNY 303