Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Ashley Bales
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the DIV III lab-science distribution requirement. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:T   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 313
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Ashley Bales
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the DIV III lab-science distribution requirement. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:W   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 313
ANTH 101-01 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and the Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every semester.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 222-01 Contemporary Peoples of Latin America
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 222 01.
1130:MWF   DENNY 21
ANTH 225-01 Human Osteology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of human biological diversity as revealed through the study of human skeletal remains. We will focus on techniques used to identify skeletal remains in archaeological, paleontological, and forensic contexts, as well as examining human skeletal responses to environmental stress and human growth and development throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite: 100 or 229 or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. Offered every other year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 233-01 Anthropology of Religion
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
A cross-cultural survey of the functions of religion, magic, and myth in simple and complex societies. Religion and communication. Myth and social structure. A historical summary of the scientific study of religion. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. Offered every other year.
1230:MWF   DENNY 311
ANTH 236-01 Japanese Society
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 236-01. This course is an introduction to contemporary Japanese society. The course examines what everyday life is like in Japan from anthropological and historical perspectives. It explores such major social institutions as families, gender, communities, workplaces, and belief systems. The course focuses as well on the ways in which modernization has affected these institutions and the identities of Japanese people.
1030:TR   DENNY 304
ANTH 241-01 Measurement and Quantification in the Social Sciences
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
This course focuses on quantitative data analysis. Students learn how to design, code, and analyze interviews and surveys. Selected databases and statistical programs are used to analyze current social issues and compare samples. Prerequisite: At least one course in SOCI, ANTH or AMST. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and QR graduation requirement. This course is cross-listed as SOCI 244.
1330:MF   STERN 11
1330:W   STERN 11
ANTH 245-01 Climate Change, Rivers, and Chinese Society
Instructor: Ann Hill, Kelin Zhuang
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01, ENST 311-04 and ERSC 311-01. Permission of Instructor Required. This course is an interdisciplinary, globally integrated course that begins with a two-week field trip to North China in January 2015. Sites visited on the field trip introduce students to the geography of the Yellow River basin and sites of human habitation long the river's course, as well as some sites that help students understand Chinas history more broadly. During the field trip portion of the course, students will create blogs and podcasts to post on a website based on their experiences in China. The course integrates climate change in East Asia and its geography with the history of populations that are identified with the Chinese state. The course focuses equally on 1) the impact of long term changes in the climate and land forms of the region, especially its large river systems, and 2) the consequences of human activity for environmental change as populations exploit natural environments, especially rivers, for livelihood, state revenues, and the market. Although the course is broadly historical, it includes case studies to illustrate in concrete detail critical aspects of longer-term trends, such as course shifts in the Yellow River, the role of irrigation in the formation of Chinese civilization, deforestation in North China, the Three Gorges Dam project, agricultural sustainability, and other important topics.
0900:TR   KAUF 178
ANTH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260 01 and ENST 311 01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments.
0930:MWF   DENNY 212
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290 01.
1330:W   DEAL 1
ANTH 331-01 Principles of Human Evolution
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and WR graduation requirements. Offered every spring.
1130:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 345-01 The Anthropology of Music in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 310-01 and LALC 300-01. Artists as individuals have had a tremendous impact on the lives of Caribbean people. Yet, in the Caribbean, the arts are as much a community enterprise as they are an individualistic endeavor. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought and culture through artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Through the use of specific case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we will interrogate salient themes in the academic literature of the region, such as agency, empowerment, self-affirmation, hegemony, resistance, and identity. We will seek to unravel how attention to musical production helps us to define the region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Through ethnographies and other critical readings, films and musical examples, we will look at how individuals and groups in the Caribbean have used artistic expression to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups (or polarize communities), resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:R   ALTHSE 109
ANTH 400-01 Senior Colloquium
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
This course is based on student independent research projects, supervised by the faculty colloquium coordinator, with special advisement from faculty colleagues. Students taking the course are encouraged to build on previous fieldwork experience or to develop new, community-based projects. In some cases, archival research may be substituted for fieldwork. The course can accommodate honors projects begun with faculty mentoring and aimed at publication. Prerequisite: 240, 241. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. Offered every year.
1330:R   DEAL 1