Fall 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the Lab Sciences (Division III) distribution requirement. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
0930:MWF   DENNY 115
1330:W   DENNY 115
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Ashley Bales
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This course fulfills the Lab Sciences (Division III) distribution requirement. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
0900:TR   DENNY 115
1330:T   DENNY 115
ANTH 101-01 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: Summer Wood
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and the Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every semester.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
ANTH 101-02 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and the Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 203
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Hendrik Van Gijseghem
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. This course fulfills the Arts (Division I C) or Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every year.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 223-01 Native Peoples of Eastern North America
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 389-01. See course description with History 389 listing. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
ANTH 230-01 Ethnography of Postcolonial Africa
Instructor: Summer Wood
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03. This course is intended as both an introduction to the ethnography of Africa and an examination of postcolonial situations in Africa. We will learn a great deal about the cultural, social, political, and economic diversity of the continent while avoiding the typological thinking that once characterized area studies. Through ethnography we will learn about African cultures, their historical contingencies, and their entanglements in various fields of power. We will assess the changing influences of pre-colonial traditions, colonialism, postcolonial states, and the global economy. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every fall.
1230:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students design their own field projects. Prerequisite:ANTH 101 or SOCI 110. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement.
1030:TR   DENNY 112
1330:T   DENNY 112
ANTH 245-01 Babies and Boomers: Asian Societies in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02.The rapid economic growth of Asia in the past several decades has led to equally rapid social transformation. This course takes the family as a lens through which to understand this social change. It explores shifts and continuities in both conceptions of family life and the composition of families themselves. The causes and effects of lowered fertility and increased longevity in Asia, particularly in China and Japan, receive special emphasis. Course materials draw from social scientific and historical accounts. In addition to normal coursework, students will be required to write a research paper on a topic related to course themes.
1500:MR   STERN 103
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Hendrik Van Gijseghem
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
1130:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 300-01 Archaeological Theory and Intrepretation
Instructor: Hendrik Van Gijseghem
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 300-01. This course explores the concepts and theories archaeologists employ to develop interpretations about and reconstructions of past societies. It examines the history of archaeological inquiry from amateur collecting to a profession and science dedicated to the systematic discovery and analysis of material remains and their interpretation. It will explore different traditions of archaeological inquiry particularly in Europe and the study of Classical archaeology and in the Americas with its roots in anthropology. Students will become conversant with contemporary trends in archaeological theory in both areas from evolutionary, ecological, and systems theory perspectives to agent-based approaches that consider gender, power, and daily practices in shaping past societies. Finally, students will engage with pertinent ethical issues surrounding archaeological patrimony. Prerequisite: ARCH 290. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 300. This course fulfills either the Arts (Division I C) or the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement. Offered every spring.
1330:MR   DEAL 1
ANTH 336-01 Social Distinctions
Instructor: Summer Wood
Course Description:
This course covers anthropological theories of social hierarchy and stratification. Both the material and ideological bases of social distinction are examined. Gender, class, race, ethnicity, kinship, and slavery are some of the specific topics covered in the course. Prerequisite: 101. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement. Offered every fall.
1500:MR   DENNY 204