Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:T   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 311
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:R   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 311
ANTH 101-01 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. Offered every semester.
1030:MWF   DENNY 21
ANTH 210-01 Language and Culture
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
This course examines the relationship of language to culture and society. It includes the study of sociolinguistics, language acquisition, cognition, and descriptive linguistics. The student is introduced to major perspectives on language from Whorf, Hymes, de Saussure, and Levi-Strauss.
1030:TR   DENNY 104
ANTH 241-01 Measurement and Quantification in the Social Sciences
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
This course focuses on quantitative data analysis. Students learn how to design, code, and analyze interviews and surveys. Selected databases and statistical programs are used to analyze current social issues and compare samples. Prerequisite: At least one course in SOCI, ANTH or AMST.
1330:TF   DENNY 112
ANTH 245-01 Growth and Development
Instructor: Catalina Villamil
Course Description:
Humans spend a long time growing up. Biological anthropologists have argued that this long period of growth and development is vital to who we are as a species, since it lets us grow big brains and fill them with information. In this course, we will seek to understand human growth and development, from conception to maturity, from an evolutionary perspective. To do so, we will use a comparative approach that includes humans, fossil hominins, and living primates, and we will incorporate anthropological, archaeological, biological, and medical knowledge to form a comprehensive picture of what it means to grow up human.
1130:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 256-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
ANTH 290-01 Archaeological Methods
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 290-01. This course focuses on archaeological field and laboratory methods through readings, lectures, and hands-on experiences and the data these practices generate. It will cover the essential field methods employed in archaeological survey (pedestrian, aerial, and geophysical) and excavation. This will include the fundamentals of documentation including note-taking, drawing, photography, and map-making. It will also introduce how archaeologists organize and analyze the large quantities and wide range of data recovered in these processes with particular attention to the use of computer databases, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It will provide a general overview of different types of laboratory analysis including lithics, ceramics, metals, plant and animal remains, and discuss the available dating methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice many of the field and lab methods in the Simulated Excavation Field (SEF), and, when available, archaeological sites in the Cumberland Valley. Through these experiences and interactions with a range of archaeological datasets, students will learn how the archaeological record is formed and what its patterns can teach us about ancient human livelihoods. Finally, students will learn to synthesize and present the results of field and laboratory research in reports, a critical genre of writing in the discipline.This course is cross-listed as ARCH 290. Prerequisite:Any two ARCH courses at 100- or 200-level; ARCH 110 highly recommended.
1330:W   DEAL 1
ANTH 331-01 Principles of Human Evolution
Instructor: Catalina Villamil
Course Description:
This course offers an intensive examination of the evolution of the human family, from our earliest ancestors to the origin and dispersal of modern humans. We use skeletal biology, geology, and archaeology to understand the human evolutionary record. Prerequisite: Any of the following: 100, 216, 218, 229 or BIOL 100-level course. Offered every spring.
0930:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 400-01 Senior Colloquium
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
This course is based on student independent research projects, supervised by the faculty colloquium coordinator, with special advisement from faculty colleagues. Students taking the course are encouraged to build on previous fieldwork experience or to develop new, community-based projects. In some cases, archival research may be substituted for fieldwork. The course can accommodate honors projects begun with faculty mentoring and aimed at publication. Prerequisite: 240, 241. Offered every year.
1330:W   DENNY 315