Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Karen Weinstein
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
0930:MWF   DENNY 115
1330:W   DENNY 115
ANTH 101-01 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 203
ANTH 101-02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester. This course is a comprehensive introduction to how cultural anthropologists study culture and society in diverse contexts. We will use ethnographic case studies from across the world to examine the ways people experience and transform social relationships and culture in areas including families, gender, ethnicity, health, religion, exchange, science, and even what it means to be a person. We will examine how culture and society are embedded within, shape, and are shaped by forces of economics, politics, and environment. Offered every semester.
1030:TR   DENNY 115
ANTH 216-01 Medical Anthropology
Instructor: Kjell Enge
Course Description:
Comparative analysis of health, illness, and nutrition within environmental and socio-cultural contexts. Evolution and geographical distribution of disease, how different societies have learned to cope with illness, and the ways traditional and modern medical systems interact. Offered every other year.
0900:TR   DENNY 203
ANTH 223-01 Native Peoples of Eastern North America
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 389-01. See course description with History 389 listing.
1330:MR   DENNY 204
ANTH 232-01 Modern China and Its Diaspora Communities
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02. This is a comparative course that examines contemporary Chinese communities in the PRC, as well as Chinese immigrant cultures located in Southeast Asia and the U.S. The focus is on both the structure of these communities and the processes of identity formation and re-imagining the "home" country or "native place" in the midst of considerable flux. The course explicitly uses comparison to deconstruct staid truths about "the Chinese" and monolithic "Chinese culture." Offered every other year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 204
ANTH 245-01 Gender in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04 and WGSS 202-01. This course introduces students to perspectives on and experiences of gender in Africa today and in the recent past using an ethnographic lens. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and films, we will consider the diverse ways people have constructed gender in their everyday lives in different parts of Africa; how people have shaped gendered knowledge and identities in cultural, social, historical, and political-economic contexts; and how matters of gender have been represented in scholarship, popular media, activism, and policy realms. A central concern of ours will be with gender in peoples practical, everyday lives: how gender is crucial to understanding politics, economics, development, social life, popular culture, and other aspects of peoples lives in Africa. A consistent theme in our diverse readings is the changing terrain of gender relations in the contexts of Africas long-term entanglements with global forces, particularly those of recent decades.
1500:MR   DENNY 204
ANTH 245-02 Primate Socioecology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course offers a survey of the order Primates. We will cover the evolution, social behavior, and ecology of our closest relatives: monkeys, apes, and prosimians. In addition to an examination of taxonomy, anatomy, reproduction, and growth and development, emphasis will be placed on conservation and the methods of field primatology. We will address some compelling issues, including aggressive and cooperative behavior, animal tool use, what makes primates distinct, and what distinguishes humans in particular.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
ANTH 245-03 Biological Determinism and the Myth of Race
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
In this course, we will critically assess biological determinismjumping to biological explanations erroneouslyin relation to race, war, gender and sex, and economic inequality. Through the lens of biological anthropology, we will explore conflicting theories of human nature, the American eugenics movement, modern scientific racism, and the origin of the concept of race. We will consider questions, such as: Are humans naturally egalitarian? And, is xenophobia evolutionarily adaptive? We will delve into some complex issues, such as that although biological races do not exist in humans, inequality and racism are so pervasive in many societies that they leave measurable biological effects on members of certain ethnic groups.
1230:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 245-04 Babies and Boomers: East Asian Populations in Transition
Instructor: Shawn Bender
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. For much of the 20th century, East Asia was known as a region of youth. In the past few decades, however, societies in East Asia have grown markedly older. This course examines the causes and consequences of declining fertility and population aging in East Asia. It looks at the impact of this changing population composition on attitudes toward reproduction, marriage, family, and gender in the region, particularly in China and Japan. Our exploration of these issues will be guided primarily by anthropological and historical accounts. By the end of the semester, students will be required to complete a research paper related to course themes.
1330:MR   STERN 7
ANTH 300-01 Archaeological Theory and Interpretation
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 300-01. This course explores the concepts and theories archaeologists employ to develop interpretations about and reconstructions of past societies. It examines the history of archaeological inquiry from amateur collecting to a profession and science dedicated to the systematic discovery and analysis of material remains and their interpretation. It will explore different traditions of archaeological inquiry particularly in Europe and the study of Classical archaeology and in the Americas with its roots in anthropology. Students will become conversant with contemporary trends in archaeological theory in both areas from evolutionary, ecological, and systems theory perspectives to agent-based approaches that consider gender, power, and daily practices in shaping past societies. Finally, students will engage with pertinent ethical issues surrounding archaeological patrimony. Prerequisite: ARCH 290. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 300. Offered every spring.
1330:TF   DEAL 1
ANTH 336-01 Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
This course examines how cultural anthropologists conceptualize their research, the topics and people they study, and their roles as intellectuals. Students read, discuss, and apply primary writings on theories addressing culture, society, power, representation, gender, race, identity, belonging and exclusion, and other experiences in diverse contexts, as well as ethical scholarship. Students join anthropologists in an extended conversation about theories, their uses, and their implications. Prerequisite: 101. Offered every fall. This course examines how cultural anthropologists conceptualize their research, the topics and people they study, and their roles as intellectuals. Students read, discuss, and apply primary writings on theories addressing culture, society, power, representation, gender, race, identity, belonging and exclusion, and other experiences in diverse contexts, as well as ethical scholarship. Students join anthropologists in an extended conversation about theories, their uses, and their implications. Prerequisite: 101. Offered every fall.
1330:MR   DENNY 315
ANTH 345-01 China Practicum
Instructor: Ann Hill, Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 313-04.Permission of instructor required.