Fall 2017

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 100-01 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Catalina Villamil
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:T   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 100-02 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Instructor: Catalina Villamil
Course Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. We will examine the development of evolutionary theory. We will then apply evolutionary theory to understand principles of inheritance, familial and population genetics in humans, human biological diversity and adaptations to different environments, behavioral and ecological diversity in nonhuman primates, and the analysis of the human skeleton and fossil record to understand the origin and evolution of the human family. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered three semesters over a two-year period.
1330:W   DENNY 115
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ANTH 101-01 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. Offered every semester.
1330:MR   DENNY 203
ANTH 101-02 Anthropology for the 21st Century
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
The primary focus is on cultural anthropology, or the comparative study of human diversity across cultures. Other subfields within anthropology, namely archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology will also contribute perspectives. The goal is to demonstrate how anthropological perspectives enlighten our understanding of contemporary social phenomena and problems, highlighting the relevance of anthropology to everyday lives and especially to issues of human diversity. Offered every semester.
0900:TR   DENNY 311
ANTH 110-01 Archaeology and World Prehistory
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01. Archaeology is the primary means by which we decipher human prehistory. Using archaeology as a guide we will start with the origins of culture from its rudimentary beginnings nearly 4 million years ago, follow the migrations of hunters and gatherers, explore the first farming villages and eventually survey the complex urban civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. We will examine the development of technology, economic and social organization through the lens of archaeological techniques and discoveries throughout the world. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 110. Offered every year.
0830:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 214-01 Ecological Anthropology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
An examination of human adaption to changing environments with an emphasis on systems analysis. Special attention to development and current environmental problems. Offered every other year.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
ANTH 230-01 Ethnography of Postcolonial Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course is intended as both an introduction to the ethnography of Africa and an examination of postcolonial situations in Africa. We will learn a great deal about the cultural, social, political, and economic diversity of the continent while avoiding the typological thinking that once characterized area studies. Through ethnography we will learn about African cultures, their historical contingencies, and their entanglements in various fields of power. We will assess the changing influences of pre-colonial traditions, colonialism, postcolonial states, and the global economy. Offered every fall.
0930:MWF   DENNY 204
ANTH 240-01 Qualitative Methods
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the theory and methods of social science research, beginning with an examination of the philosophies underlying various research methodologies. The course then focuses on ethnographic field methods, introducing students to the techniques of participant observation, structured and informal interviewing, oral histories, sociometrics, and content analysis. Students design their own field projects. Prerequisite:ANTH 101 or SOCI 110.
1330:W   DENNY 112
1030:TR   DENNY 204
ANTH 245-01 Primate Socioecology
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
This course offers a survey of the order Primates. We will cover the evolution, social behavior, and ecology of our closest relatives: monkeys, apes, and prosimians. In addition to an examination of taxonomy, anatomy, reproduction, and growth and development, emphasis will be placed on conservation and the methods of field primatology. We will address some compelling issues, including aggressive and cooperative behavior, animal tool use, what makes primates distinct, and what distinguishes humans in particular.
1030:MWF   DENNY 115
ANTH 245-02 Biological Determinism and the Myth of Race
Instructor: Joshua Marshack
Course Description:
In this course, we will critically assess biological determinismjumping to biological explanations erroneouslyin relation to race, war, gender and sex, and economic inequality. Through the lens of biological anthropology, we will explore conflicting theories of human nature, the American eugenics movement, modern scientific racism, and the origin of the concept of race. We will consider questions, such as: Are humans naturally egalitarian? And, is xenophobia evolutionarily adaptive? We will delve into some complex issues, such as that although biological races do not exist in humans, inequality and racism are so pervasive in many societies that they leave measurable biological effects on members of certain ethnic groups.
1230:MWF   DENNY 315
ANTH 260-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 260. Offered every two years.
1130:MWF   DENNY 313
ANTH 261-01 Archaeology of North America
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 261-01. This course reviews Pre-Columbian landscapes north of Mesoamerica. We consider topics including the timing and process of the initial peopling of the continent, food production, regional systems of exchange, development of social hierarchies, environmental adaption and the nature of initial colonial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans. These questions are addressed primarily by culture area and region. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 261. Offered every two years.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
ANTH 300-01 Archaeological Theory and Interpretation
Instructor: Christofilis Maggidis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 300-01. This course explores the concepts and theories archaeologists employ to develop interpretations about and reconstructions of past societies. It examines the history of archaeological inquiry from amateur collecting to a profession and science dedicated to the systematic discovery and analysis of material remains and their interpretation. It will explore different traditions of archaeological inquiry particularly in Europe and the study of Classical archaeology and in the Americas with its roots in anthropology. Students will become conversant with contemporary trends in archaeological theory in both areas from evolutionary, ecological, and systems theory perspectives to agent-based approaches that consider gender, power, and daily practices in shaping past societies. Finally, students will engage with pertinent ethical issues surrounding archaeological patrimony. Prerequisite: ARCH 290. This course is cross-listed as ARCH 300. Offered every spring.
1330:M   ARCH LAB
ANTH 336-01 Social Distinctions
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
This course covers anthropological theories of social hierarchy and stratification. Both the material and ideological bases of social distinction are examined. Gender, class, race, ethnicity, kinship, and slavery are some of the specific topics covered in the course. Prerequisite: 101. Offered every fall.
1330:MR   DENNY 315
ANTH 345-01 Music, Film and Culture in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 310-01, FLST 310-04 and LALC 300-01. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought, and culture through attention to artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Using films, music videos, ethnographies and other critical readings, we analyze how musical production and music events help us to define the Caribbean region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Employing case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Francophone, Hispanophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we look at how individuals and groups have used music to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups, resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:M   DENNY 212
ANTH 500-01 Uyghur Identity, Culture Variation & Gender
Instructor: Ann Hill
Course Description: