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Faculty Profile

Evan Young

Assistant Professor of History (2015)

Contact Information

youngw@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 102
717.254.8170

Bio

W. Evan Young is a historian of medicine and science who also specializes in East Asian Studies. He teaches courses on the history of illness and therapy, the history of East Asia (including China, Korea, and Japan), and the history of gender and sexuality. His first book project, Family at the Bedside: Illness, Healing, and Knowledge in Early Modern Japan, explores how families dealt with ailments in eighteenth and nineteenth century Japan. His second major research project traces the history of medical knowledge in popular print, especially women’s magazines, from the late nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century. His work has been supported by the Social Science Research Council and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the Prange Collection and Miller Center for Historical Studies, and the D. Kim Foundation for the History of Science and Technology in East Asia.

Education

  • B.A., St. Olaf College, 2005
  • Ph.D., Princeton University, 2015

2021-2022 Academic Year

Fall 2021

HIST 101 Life & Death Samurai & Geisha
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01.In this course, we critically investigate the surprising origins behind some of the most pervasive icons of premodern Japan. By analyzing a variety of historical sources, including diaries, legal petitions, picture scrolls, and woodblock prints, students will gain insight into what it was like to live in the 13th-18th centuries. Topics include the rise of the samurai as a military and political force, the development of geisha as skilled entertainers, peasant revolts, warrior monks, and the texture of everyday life. By analyzing these sources and engaging with new, innovative scholarship, students will learn how to craft original and compelling arguments that change the way we understand premodern Japanese society and culture.

HIST 204 Intro Historical Methodology
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.

EASN 206 Life & Death Samurai & Geisha
Cross-listed with HIST 101-01. In this course, we critically investigate the surprising origins behind some of the most pervasive icons of premodern Japan. By analyzing a variety of historical sources, including diaries, legal petitions, picture scrolls, and woodblock prints, students will gain insight into what it was like to live in the 13th-18th centuries. Topics include the rise of the samurai as a military and political force, the development of geisha as skilled entertainers, peasant revolts, warrior monks, and the texture of everyday life. By analyzing these sources and engaging with new, innovative scholarship, students will learn how to craft original and compelling arguments that change the way we understand premodern Japanese society and culture.