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Faculty Profile

Kristin Strock

Associate Professor of Environmental Studies (2014)

Contact Information

strockk@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Hall Room 112
717.254.8008
http://www.dickinson.edu/kristinstrock

Bio

Dr. Strock uses modern aquatic ecology and fossil records contained in lake sediments, to explore issues that are critical to effectively managing freshwater resources. Her interests include freshwater and ecosystem ecology and paleoecology, ecosystem response to changes in climate and atmospheric deposition, watershed biogeochemistry, algal ecology, food-web interactions, and freshwater resource management. Her most recent work has taken her to Iceland where she's studying carbon cycling in the ice, rivers, and lakes of this polar environment with the support of National Geographic.

Education

  • B.S., James Madison University, 2006
  • M.S., University of Maine, 2010
  • Ph.D., 2013

2020-2021 Academic Year

Spring 2021

ENST 305 Conservation Biology
We appear to be entering the sixth major extinction of biodiversity in the history of life on earth. Unlike the previous five mass extinctions, this one is largely a result of human activity. The field of conservation biology has developed to face the challenge of protecting the world’s biological diversity and to better understand human impacts on species, communities, and ecosystems. In this course, we will examine the biological diversity of life on Earth: what is it, where is it, and how do we measure it? As a class, we will explore the history of diversity change through geologic time and discuss the implications of human activities on biodiversity. Through a series of readings, case studies, and hands-on activities, this course will cover the principles of conservation biology, as well as the ways in which we value biodiversity, including ecological, economic, and ethical perspectives. This course may count as a theme course in both the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies major or as an Applications of Environmental Science course.

ENSC 550 Environmental Science Research

ENST 550 Independent Research