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Faculty Profile

Sarah St. Angelo

(she/her/hers)Associate Professor of Chemistry (2006)

Contact Information

stangels@dickinson.edu

Stuart Hall - Rector Complex Room 2113
717.254.8957

Bio

Professor St. Angelo's training and research is in the interdisciplinary field of nanochemistry, particularly synthesis, characterization, and applications of metal, mixed metal, and metal oxide nanomaterials. Two ongoing projects in her research group involve developing catalytic nanomaterials for the degradation of pollutants in water. One project uses ultrasmall copper nanoparticles developed in her research lab in chemically mediated catalytic reactions, and another uses hybrid metal oxide and metal nanomaterials for photocatalytic oxidation reactions. Additionally, Professor St. Angelo has partnered with the College Farm on several collaborative course-based projects and student research projects. She regularly teaches Thermodynamics and Kinetics with Lab, Inorganic Chemistry with Lab, General Chemistry, and courses related to nanotechnology. She is also interested in the practice and teaching of scientific writing, communication of science with the public, course-based research, and ethics in science.

Education

  • B.S., Denison University, 1997
  • Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 2004

2022-2023 Academic Year

Fall 2022

CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
The major focus of this course is on the reactivities of organic and inorganic molecules; this is an extension of the study of the covalent bond that was studied in Chemistry 131/132 or 141. . Topics include reaction types and mechanisms, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, analysis and identification of organic and inorganic molecules. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 132 or 141.

CHEM 347 Concepts of Inorganic Chem
This course will cover fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry to include: periodic trends, atomic and molecular structure, ionic bonding and crystal structures, solubility of ionic solids, acid-base chemistry, structure and bonding in coordination compounds, and reactions of transition metal complexes. Throughout the course the unifying theme will be the application of principles of structure and bonding to predict and explain reactions involving inorganic compounds. Three hours classroom and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 244, 341 or concurrent enrollment.