Skip To Content Skip To Menu Skip To Footer

Faculty Profile

Mariana Past

Associate Professor of Spanish (2006)

Contact Information

pastm@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 124
717.245.1833

Office Hours for Fall 2021: Mondays 2:00-4:00 pm EST & by appointment
Office Hours for Fall 2021: 2-3 pm EST (virtual office hour; please email to request Zoom link)

Bio

Professor Past's research focuses on Spanish and Francophone Caribbean literature, including issues of migration/exile, Haitian-Dominican relations, and representations of the Haitian Revolution. Her articles have appeared in the Revista de la Casa de las Américas, Afro-Hispanic Review, Revista del Caribe, Global South, Journal of Haitian Studies, Cultural Dynamics, sx salon, and Atlantic Studies. She co-edited (with Natalie Léger, CUNY Queens College) Toussaint Louverture: Repensar un icono (2015) and co-translated (with Benjamin Hebblethwaite, UFL) Michel-Rolph Trouillot's (1977) Ti difé boulé sou istoua Ayiti [Stirring the Pot of Haitian History] from Haitian Creole to English. She has also published poetry and prose translations in Metamorphoses, Transition, and World Literature Today. Professor Past teaches courses that emphasize the overlapping histories and cultures of people in the Caribbean and the broader diaspora, challenging notions of cultural production in terms of national linguistic blocks.

Education

  • B.A., University of Texas at Austin, 1994
  • M.A., Duke University, 2002
  • Ph.D., 2006

2021-2022 Academic Year

Fall 2021

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on speaking. Prerequisite: 101. Upon completion, students go to 201.

LALC 285 Nat Disasters & Trop Paradises
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01, AFST 310-01 and ENGL 321-03.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.

AFST 310 Nat Disasters & Trop Paradises
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01, LALC 285-01 and ENGL 321-03.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.

ENGL 321 Nat Disasters & Trop Paradises
Cross-listed with LALC 285-01, AFST 310-01 and SPAN 380-01.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.

SPAN 380 Nat Disasters & Trop Paradises
Cross-listed with LALC 285-01, AFST 310-01 and ENGL 321-03.This seminar (taught in English) examines recent Caribbean literary responses to ostensibly “natural” disasters, with Haiti and Puerto Rico being central case studies. How do writers’ responses to crises like earthquakes and hurricanes reflect specific sites of struggle and larger social, political and cultural concerns affecting the region, such as climate change and migration? To what degree do short stories, novels, poems, and essays shape discourses of national identity related to race, class, and gender? This course, emphasizing critical analysis, research skills, and the writing process, will help students craft an effective literature review and carry out specialized, in-depth research. Students will advance towards a more comprehensive and comparative understanding of the complexities surrounding Caribbean cultural production and will become familiar with current debates surrounding postmodernity, globalization, and diaspora studies as well as Caribbean writers’ preoccupations with identity, agency, and belonging.