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Faculty Profile

Erik Love

Associate Professor of Sociology (2009; 2012)

Contact Information

lovee@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 215
717.245.1225
http://www.eriklove.com

Bio

Erik Love teaches courses on social movements, race and racism, and qualitative methods. He studies civil rights advocacy organizations in the United States. His first book, Islamophobia and Racism in America, was published in 2017. He has presented his research on the efforts of Arab, Muslim, Sikh, and South Asian American advocacy organizations at several academic conferences, in peer-reviewed journals, and he has contributed to a wide range of popular publications. His work has won the support of the National Science Foundation, the Richard Flacks Fund for the Study of Democracy, and Emory University's James Weldon Johnson Center for the Study of Race and Difference. Originally from Detroit, he has traveled widely, including stints studying and working in places like Jerusalem, Cairo, and Kyoto. Erik holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California at Santa Barbara, where he was a Regents Fellow.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.A., Albion College, 2001
  • M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2006
  • Ph.D., 2011

2022-2023 Academic Year

Fall 2022

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

SOCI 110 Social Analysis
Selected topics in the empirical study of the ways in which people's character and life choices are affected by variations in the organization of their society and of the activities by which social arrangements varying in their adequacy to human needs are perpetuated or changed.

SOCI 230 Health Justice & Societal Chng
Health justice is the process of creating equity in our public health system by working alongside community members to envision an environment that promotes health rather than destroys it. ( The Network for Public Health Law). Health injustice has contributed to the margination of historically disinvested communities. Throughout the history of the United States health advocates , neighborhood coalitions and other community change organizations have engaged in meaningful resistance to the systematic barriers that derails an environment where all individuals can reach their highest potential of health. This course examines the sociological factors that have contributed to the development of historical and present health injustices in the United States, while also exploring modern advocacy efforts to achieve health equity.