Faculty Profile

Lorelei Koss

Professor of Mathematics (1998)

Contact Information

koss@dickinson.edu

Tome Scientific Building Romom 241
717.245.1334
http://users.dickinson.edu/~koss/

Bio

Her scholarship concentrates on ergodic theory and complex dynamical systems. Her current research focuses on the parametrized dynamics of meromorphic functions.

Education

  • B.A., Columbia University, 1989
  • M.A, 1992
  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1998

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

MATH 170 Single Variable Calculus
The study of real-valued functions, including transcendental functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, the definition of the Riemann integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.Three hours of classroom and one and a half hour of lab per week. Prerequisite: 151 or departmental placement. Offered every semester.

MATH 201 Dynamical Systems/Info Theory
In dynamical systems, we study how processes change with time. Real-world examples of dynamical systems include the stock market, the motion of planets and galaxies, population growth and decline, weather systems, and chemical changes. Dynamical systems that are chaotic exhibit some type of unpredictability in their behavior. While topics in dynamical systems have been studied for hundreds of years, the recent development of computer graphics has contributed to a surge of interest and progress in the field. Our focus will be on one-dimensional real dynamical systems and symbolic dynamics. We will also explore the relationship between dynamical systems and information theory. In particular, we will study ways in which we can code information for efficiency. When you ZIP a file on your computer, you are compressing data, but you expect that you will be able to recover this data later. How can you encode a particular message in a way so that you can both minimize the space needed to store it but also be able to recover the original data? We will see how the how the topics of entropy as well as the Noiseless Coding Theorem help answer these questions.

MATH 361 Real Analysis
A theoretical development of the basic ideas and concepts of real analysis. Topics include a study of real numbers, sequences, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration. Optional topics include infinite series, sequences and series of functions, and an introduction to point-set topology.Prerequisite: 171, 262 and 270. Offered every fall.

MATH 361 Real Analysis
A theoretical development of the basic ideas and concepts of real analysis. Topics include a study of real numbers, sequences, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration. Optional topics include infinite series, sequences and series of functions, and an introduction to point-set topology.Prerequisite: 171, 262 and 270. Offered every fall.

MATH 550 Independent Research

Spring 2019

MATH 472 Complex Analysis
An introductory study of functions in the complex plane. Topics include: complex numbers and functions, the theory of differentiation and integration of complex functions; Cauchy's integral theorem; the Residue theorem. Prerequisite: 361 and completion of, or concurrent registration in 351. Offered in odd numbered spring semesters.

MATH 472 Complex Analysis
An introductory study of functions in the complex plane. Topics include: complex numbers and functions, the theory of differentiation and integration of complex functions; Cauchy's integral theorem; the Residue theorem. Prerequisite: 361 and completion of, or concurrent registration in 351. Offered in odd numbered spring semesters.