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Faculty Profile

John Katunich

Associate Director of the Writing Program (2018)

Contact Information

katunicj@dickinson.edu

Waidner-Boyd Lee Spahr Library
717.254.8390

Education

  • B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1995
  • M.A., The State University of Pennsylvania, 1999
  • M.A., University of Michigan, 2005
  • Ph.D., The State University of Pennsylvania, 2019

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

WRPG 101 US Cult/Acad Writ for Intl Stu
This course introduces international students to important U.S. cultural conversations while also explaining the forms, conventions, and expectations of U.S. academic writing. Students will read texts from various disciplines, such as sociology, history, and literature, which provide different perspectives on issues of race, ethnicity, and gender. Through class discussion and writing assignments, students will examine some of the diverse identities within the U.S. and will develop a critical understanding of the issues of power and privilege that shape the interaction between dominant and subordinated groups. Also, students will learn about U.S. academic discourse by practicing the research and writing processes and analyzing the choices U.S. writers make in organization and argument. As a result, the course will help international students make the transition to U.S. culture and academic life at Dickinson College.Full credit. Offered every year.

WRPG 102 Top in Sust & Acad Writing
This course introduces students to critical topics in sustainability while also explaining the forms, conventions, and expectations of academic writing. Students will think critically about a contemporary topic in sustainability (such as climate change or biodiversity loss) in order to analyze rhetorical moves and assumptions in popular texts on this issue. Students will also learn about academic discourse by practicing a functional, recursive writing process in order to produce thesis-driven arguments about a contemporary sustainability debate and/or sustainability action.