Faculty Profile

Lynn Johnson

Associate Professor of Africana Studies (2004)

Contact Information

johnsoly@dickinson.edu

Bio

Lynn R. Johnson specializes in African American literature, African Aesthetics, and Africana literary cultures. Her primary research interests are in African American literary production and theory and Middle Passage studies. Currently, she is completing a manuscript that examines the relationship between food and psychological disease and wellness as portrayed in African American fiction.

Education

  • B.A., Salisbury University, 1996
  • M.A., Temple University, 1998
  • Ph.D., 2007

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

AFST 200 Approaches to Africana Studies
This course will investigate the importance of conceptual analysis and the development of concepts in the theoretical and textual research of Africana Studies. Thus, the course will focus on various interpretive frameworks and approaches to organizing and understanding Africana Studies, including but not limited to the African model, Afrocentricity, diaspora model, critical race theory, post-modernism, and post colonialism. Prerequisite: 100.

WGSS 301 Toni Morrison
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and ENGL 321-03. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.

AFST 320 Toni Morrison
Cross-listed with ENGL 321-03 and WGSS 301-03. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.

ENGL 321 Toni Morrison
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and WGSS 301-03. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.

AFST 500 Independent Study

AFST 500 Independent Study

AFST 500 Independent Study

Spring 2019

AFST 100 Intro to Africana Studies
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01.

LALC 121 Intro to Africana Studies
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01.

AFST 220 African American Foodways
This course examines the multifarious ways in which food has influenced the expressions of African American identity and culture. We will begin with a discussion of food as a cultural connector that preserves the ties between African Americans and their African antecedents. Subsequently, we will consider specific African American culinary practices and the origins of soul food. Additionally, we will analyze the roles of food in African American social activism. In so doing, we will pay particular attention to the relationships that exist among food consumption, human rights, and African American communal health, as represented by the anti-soul food and black vegetarianism/veganism movements.