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Coronavirus Update

Dickinson will invite students back for the spring. Campus buildings are closed and face coverings are required on campus.

Additional Information.


Faculty Profile

Christopher Francese

The Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies (1996)

Contact Information

francese@dickinson.edu

East College Room 106
717.245.1202
http://blogs.dickinson.edu/francese/

Bio

My main teaching focus is on Latin literature and Greek and Roman Mythology. I also teach a course on a classical approach to public speaking. I have written books on ancient Rome and Latin literature: Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources (2014, with Scott Smith); Ancient Rome in So Many Words (2007), Parthenius of Nicaea and Roman Poetry (2001) and Latin and Ancient Greek Core Vocabularies (2020). I love working with secondary teachers and direct a series of professional development workshops for Latin teachers, the Dickinson Latin Workshops. My other passion is digital humanities, and getting students involved with the creation of high-quality resources for learners of Latin and Greek. I direct Dickinson College Commentaries, a series of online multimedia editions of classical texts, and co-direct Dickinson Classics Online, which provides resources for Chinese speaking students of Latin and Greek. I also produce the Latin Poetry Podcast, a series of Latin texts translated and read aloud in the original.

Education

  • B.A., Oberlin College, 1987
  • M.A., University of Texas at Austin, 1989
  • Ph.D., 1993

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

CLST 200 Public Speaking: Secrets
An introduction to the ancient art of public persuasion, with examination of more recent examples of effective speeches at crucial junctures in America history, insights from the Greek and Roman theorists and practitioners, and practice putting these ideas and techniques to use. Since speech can be a weapon as well as an art, the class examines the ethical aspects of oratory in the context of citizenship in a republic.

CLST 390 Senior Research Colloquium
This capstone course for the classical studies major includes an individually designed research project on an open question in Classical Studies based on a set of primary sources or data, and a reflective essay that applies one or more classical texts to a contemporary issue or problem of the student’s choosing. A syllabus of common readings is developed based on student interests as determined prior to the course. Class meetings include discussion of common readings, presentation of draft research and ideas for the reflective essay, field trips to museums and visiting lectures, and discussion of the value of the classical studies major to prospective employers and others. Results of the research and reflection will be published on Dickinson Scholar and publicized via the department blog.Prerequisite: Three LATN or GREK courses above 102 and CLST 251 or 253.